Catalog Version

Summer/Autumn 2013
Catalog update:
May 15, 2013

Access archived catalogs in the Catalog Archive section.​​​​​

Students are required to follow the Academic Handbook and Code of Student Responsibility​​

Courses in the Scientific Inquiry domain are designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn the methods of modern science and its impact in understanding the world around us. Courses are designed to help students develop a more complete perspective about science and the scientific process, including: an understanding of the major principles guiding modern scientific thought; a comprehension of the varying approaches and aspects of science; an appreciation of the connection among the sciences and the fundamental role of mathematics in practicing science; an awareness of the roles and limitations of theories and models in interpreting, understanding, and predicting natural phenomena; and a realization of how these theories and models change or are supplanted as our knowledge increases.

Where required, the Quantitative Reasoning and Technological Literacy sequence (LSP 120 & LSP 121) is a prerequisite for SI Domain courses.  Students have the option to test out of one or both of these courses.  Generally three SI courses are required and one course must be designated as an SI lab course. Students who complete both LSP 120 and LSP 121 will have their total Domain Area requirements reduced by one.  Within the SI Domain, only non-lab SI courses are eligible for this reduction.  

Courses

Below please find examples of courses previously offered for scientific inquiry credit. For information on current offerings, please consult Campus Connection.

Scientific Inquiry: Lab Courses

Anthropology

Art Media and Design

Biological Sciences

Chemistry

Computer Graphics and Animation

Digital Cinema

Environmental Science

Nursing

Physics

STEM Studies

Scientific Inquiry: Non-Lab Courses

Anthropology

Biological Sciences

Chemistry

Computer Science

E-Commerce Technology

Environmental Science

Geography

Human Computer Interaction

Information Technology

Interactive and Social Media

Mathematics

Nursing

Physics

Psychology

School for New Learning

Sociology

STEM Studies

​Telecommunication and Data Systems

LSP 120

QUANTITATIVE REASONING & TECHNOLOGICAL LITERACY I

This course provides a mathematical foundation for students to become confident and critical users of quantitative information of all kinds: numerical, graphical, and verbal. Students analyze data from a wide variety of fields, making and critiquing quantitative arguments. Mathematical topics include proportional reasoning and rates, the making and interpretation of graphs, linear and exponential models, logarithms, and finance. The course is taught in a hands-on laboratory environment where students are introduced to computer tools for data analysis and presentation. PREREQUISITE(S): MAT 100, MAT 101, or demonstrating readiness via the math placement test taken at matriculation. As an alternative to taking LSP 120, this requirement can be met by passing a separate LSP 120 Proficiency Exam (see qrc.depaul.edu). A student whose major requires calculus is exempt from this requirement. Formerly ISP 120.
Prerequisites:
ISP 110 or MAT 100 or MAT 101 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

LSP 121

QUANTITATIVE REASONING AND TECHNOLOGICAL LITERACY II (FORMERLY ISP 121)

This course provides more advanced mathematical and computational methods in the analysis and interpretation of quantitative information. Topics include databases, descriptive statistics, measures of association and their interpretation, elementary probability theory, and an introduction to algorithms and computer programming. The course is taught in a hands-on laboratory environment where students are introduced to advanced computer tools for data analysis, including databases and a professional statistical software package. PREREQUISITE(S): LSP 120 or a passing score on the LSP 120 Proficiency Exam. As an alternative to taking LSP 121, this requirement can be met by passing a separate LSP 121 Proficiency Exam (see qrc.depaul.edu). A student whose major requires calculus is exempt from this requirement. Formerly ISP 121.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or (MAT 147 or above) is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 491

ADMINISTRATIVE THEORY AND BEHAVIOR

This course concerns theoretical concepts and empirical research relating to administrative behavior in organizations with special reference to educational organizations. Concepts are examined within the typical decisional framework of supervisors, chief school business officers, principles, and superintendents, and similar positions in the helping professions. Assignments are individualized.
Prerequisites:
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

ANT 104

INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

This course will examine the biological history of the human species culminating with an exploration of human biological variation in the modern world. Principles of evolutionary theory and genetics will first be presented to provide a framework for the study of human evolutionary biology. The fossil evidence for human evolution will then be considered using comparative data from nonhuman primate ecology to help reconstruct prehistoric lives. Finally, features of biological modernity will be discussed. Particular attention will be given to how human populations utilized biological and behavioral mechanisms to adapt to their environments throughout evolutionary history. The course includes labs.

ANT 120

SCIENCE OF ARCHAEOLOGY

Archaeology spans the academic worlds of the physical sciences and the social sciences. In this course, the physical science qualities of the discipline are introduced. Students explore the various ways archaeologists use model building, statistical inference, and evidence analysis to reconstruct past human experiences. The course includes two hour of lab and two hours of lecture/discussion per week.

ART 223

LIGHT, COLOR, AND PHOTOGRAPHY

Principles of image making with lenses, mirrors and photographic processes. Discusses the physical properties of light and color including those used in laser and holography.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 155

INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY WITH LABORATORY

This lecture-laboratory course deals with the scientific method, biological chemistry, structure and function of cells, organs, and organ systems, heredity, evolution and ecology. Course includes a laboratory experience involving biological concepts discussed in class. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 115 and BIO 155. No credit for Biology majors or minors Lab fee

BIO 156

FOOD, FUEL FOR LIFE

Food from a biological perspective: defined at the chemical and biochemical level and as it fuels life through metabolism and nutrition. Other topics include improving foods by traditional breeding and new genetic engineering technology, food production, sustainable agriculture; food safety issues, and feeding world populations. No credit for Biology majors or minors

BIO 160

MARINE BIOLOGY WITH LAB

Study of marine diversity; marine ecosystems; and connections between oceans, the atmosphere, and humans. Lecture-Laboratory. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 118 and BIO 160. No credit for Biology majors or minors

BIO 161

INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND IMMUNITY WITH LABORATORY

This course is designed to introduce students to the world of microorganisms with particular emphasis on how microorganisms cause disease and the actions of the human body in fighting disease. This course includes a laboratory experience to reinforce concepts and introduce students to practical aspects of disease causing microorganisms. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 121 and BIO 161. No credit for Biology majors or minors

BIO 166

INTRODUCTION TO PLANT BIOLOGY WITH LAB

This course deals with the characteristic features of higher plants, plant products that are beneficial to humans, structure, physiology and ecology of cultivated plants, and modern horticultural and genetic approaches to the improvement of plants and plant productivity. No credit for Biology majors or minors

BIO 191

GENERAL BIOLOGY I FOR SCIENCE MAJORS

Focuses on the unity of life: its biochemical and cellular makeup and functions, the acquisition and utilization of energy, and the storage and utilization of genetic information. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee. CO-REQUISITE(S): Recommended: CHE 130 and CHE 131.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 192

GENERAL BIOLOGY II FOR SCIENCE MAJORS

Introduction to evolution, ecology, organismal development and diversity. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 and BIO 191 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 193

GENERAL BIOLOGY III FOR SCIENCE MAJORS

Deals primarily with diversity and development within the plant and animal kingdoms including basic principles of physiology. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 and BIO 192 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 202

HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

Introduction to concepts and mechanisms of human organ system function including respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, muscular, nervous, endocrine and digestive systems. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee. Primarily for Health Science majors. No credit for Biology majors or minors. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 202 and BIO 134.

CHE 101

EXPLORING MATTER

A course for non-science majors that develops the fundamental concepts of chemistry with experimental exploration to complement the methods and ideas encountered in reading and discussion in class. Only one of series 100-102 may be taken for credit. Lab fee.

CHE 103

ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

A discussion and laboratory exploration of the technological origins, effects, and control of environmental pollutants. Lab fee.

CHE 105

EXPLORING NUTRIENTS/SCIENCE OF NUTRITION

A discussion and laboratory exploration of the chemical molecules which supply nutrients for living organisms. This course also includes a quantitative project, applicable to the individual student, to enhance the understanding of the principles of nutrition. Lab fee.

CHE 107

PROTEINS AND THEIR GENES

A discussion and laboratory introduction to many aspects of proteins: their chemical structures, biological functions, how genes store the information to make them, and how changes in genes can lead to changes in proteins, and to cancer and other diseases. Lab fee.

CHE 109

FORENSIC CHEMISTRY

Discussion and laboratory exploration of the application of modern science to problems in criminology, evidence, art, and archaeology. Lab fee.

CHE 130

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I

This introductory course for science majors emphasizes the composition of matter, atomic and molecular structure, bonding and chemical reactions. It is the first in the three-course sequence of General Chemistry. This course meets for three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 131.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or (CHE 128 and CHE 129) is a prerequisite for this class.

GPH 259

DESIGN GEOMETRY

(Cross-listed with ART 295) An historical and practical introduction to the visual applications of geometry. This CAD-based survey covers constructive geometry, surface symmetry, projective geometry, polyhedrons and spheroids through the discussion of historical precedents and practicum exercises.

DC 274

IMAGE, OPTICS AND CINEMATIC MOTION

Cinematography is the scientifically grounded discipline of making lighting and camera choices in order to record moving images. This course deals with the basic mathematics, physics, and photochemistry that underlies cinematography and that motivate camera design and construction. A student who masters the foundations of cinematography through a mixture of lectures, readings, exercises, and labs will be able to evaluate and understand how motion based recording choices affect perception of moving images they see every day. This course has an additional fee.

ENV 102

INTRO TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE WITH LAB

ENV 102 provides an overview of how the natural world works, how we interact with it and how we can work to protect, restore and sustain it for the future. Topics include an overview of basic ecological principles, population, biodiversity, energy, natural resources and pollution. The course emphasis is on the science behind current environmental concerns. Social, ethical, economic, and political perspectives are considered in order to provide perspective and a fuller understanding of the issues and their solutions. Lab investigations further develop scientific and environmental understandings. Students cannot receive credit for both ENV 101 and ENV 102. Lab fee applies.

ENV 115

ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY

An examination of the earth's materials and structures, and the processes responsible for their formation; how geologic processes and hazards influence human activities (and vice versa); and a discussion of geologic resources and the geological aspects of waste disposal and pollution. The course includes a three-hour lab. Students cannot receive credit for both ENV 115 and ENV 116. Lab fee applies.

ENV 117

EARTH THROUGH TIME WITH LABORATORY

A general introduction to the 4.6 billion-year geologic history of planet Earth. The course scientifically explores the history of the earth from its formation to present day, the origin and transformation of rocks, internal and external geologic processes and structures, evolution and extinction of organisms, and patterns of Earth's environmental conditions through time. The course includes a three-hour lab. Lab fee applies.

NSG 230

WOMEN'S HEALTH: THE PHYSICAL SELF

This course explores the biological dimensions of women's health. The theoretical bases for evaluating medical research, assessing personal health, and decision-making consumerism from a feminist perspective are emphasized. An advanced-level scientific research paper due at the end of the quarter. Laboratory fee required.
Prerequisites:
WRD 103 or HON 101 or HON 100 or ENG 120 is a prerequisite for this class.

NSG 232

MEN'S HEALTH: THE PHYSICAL SELF

This introductory course explores the unitary nature of men's health patterns focusing on anatomy and physiology of the major body systems emphasizing the difference in males. Health issues pertinent to these system differences in males will be presented based upon health risks, assessment, screening, diagnosis, management and treatment. Developing an understanding of male anatomy and physiology utilizing correct medical terminology to describe various parts and conditions. Elements of scientific research are explored in the context of lecture and laboratory sessions. Students select a research-based topic supported by clinical research studies to articulate their knowledge and understanding through a written paper and oral power point presentation.

PHY 110

BASIC ELECTRONICS: PRINCIPLES & TECHNIQUES

Introduction to analog electronics that develops the basic principles needed to understand consumer electronics. Emphasis is given to audio applications, but the same basic principles are the foundation of modern computer technology. Lab Fee.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this course,

PHY 114

EXPLORING OTHER WORLDS

Activity-based course that compares the local environment of Earth in the Solar System to worlds and environments elsewhere in the Universe. Cannot receive credit for both PHY 104 and PHY 114. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this course,

PHY 150

GENERAL PHYSICS I

This course provides a comprehensive, non-calculus introduction to physics. Vectors, forces, Newtonia mechanics of translational and rotational motion. This course is intended for life science and health science majors. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or above is a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 151

GENERAL PHYSICS II

Continuation of PHY 150. Topics include heat, thermodynamics, sound and light. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
PHY 150 is a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 152

GENERAL PHYSICS III

Continuation of PHY 151. Topics include electricity, magnetism and modern physics. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
PHY 151 is a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 155

GENERAL PHYSICS

A combination of Physics 150 plus half of 151. Summer only. 6 hours. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or above is a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 156

GENERAL PHYSICS

A combination of the last half of Physics 151 plus 152. Summer only. 6 hours. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
PHY 155 is a prerequisite for this course.

PHY 170

UNIVERSITY PHYSICS I

This course provides a comprehensive, calculus-based introduction to Newtonian mechanics. Topics include vectors, Newton's laws, linear and rotational motion. Course intended for majors in a physical science, required for the physics major. Laboratory fee. Autumn. COREQUISITE(S): MAT 147 or MAT 160 or MAT 170.
Prerequisites:
MAT 147 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a corequisite for this class.

PHY 171

UNIVERSITY PHYSICS II

A continuation of PHY 170. Topics include heat, sound and light. Laboratory fee. Winter COREQUISITE(S): MAT 161 or 171 or 148.
Prerequisites:
PHY 170 is a prerequisite for this course.

PHY 172

UNIVERSITY PHYSICS III

A continuation of PHY 171. Topics include electricity and magnetism. Laboratory fee. Spring COREQUISITE(S):MAT 162 or 172 or 149.
Prerequisites:
PHY 171 is a prerequisite for this course.

PHY 200

LIGHT AND ATOMS

A conceptual treatment of light and matter, which emphasizes the counter-intuitive behavior of atoms, electrons and photons. Topics covered include the electrical nature of matter, wave-particle duality, the uncertainty principle, and philosophical implications. Some applications to technology will also be discussed such as lasers, fiber optic communication, superconductivity, and magnetic storage of data. lab fee.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this course,

PHY 206

SOUND AND ACOUSTICS

Sound waves, their production, transmission and detection; applications to music, acoustics and noise pollution. lab fee.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this course,

PHY 223

LIGHT, COLOR, AND PHOTOGRAPHY

Principles of image formation with lenses and mirrors. Discussion of color, interference, polarization, and diffraction. Introduction to cameras and film, lasers and holography. Lab fee. Cross-listed with ART 223.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this course,

PHY 232

INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL ELECTRONICS

Principles of combinational logic circuits. Boolean algebra and Boolean function simplification. State diagrams and sequential logic circuits, and MSI devices. Digital circuit prototyping using SSI components. (lab fee)
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this course,

ANT 270

HUMAN EVOLUTION

Principles of evolutionary theory and genetics will first be presented to provide a framework for the study of human evolutionary biology. Beginning with the earliest fossil evidence, the course will trace human evolution. Particular attention will be given to the forces of environment and sexual selection at work at various points in time. Data from nonhuman primate ecology will be used to help reconstruct prehistoric lives.

ANT 272

INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

This course explores the interrelationships between culture and human health for the purposes of understanding the biosocial origins of disease, systems of treatment, and the global inequalities that shape disease patterns and access to health care resources.

BIO 115

INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY

Deals with the scientific method, biological chemistry, structure, function, and heredity of cells and organisms, evolution and ecology. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 115 and BIO 155, No credit for Biology majors or minors.

BIO 118

MARINE BIOLOGY

Study of marine diversity, marine ecosystems, and connections between oceans and humans. Student cannot receive credit for both BIO 118 and 160, No credit for Biology majors or minors.

BIO 121

INFECTIOUS DISEASES AND IMMUNITY

This course is designed to introduce students to the world of microorganisms, especially those which cause infectious diseases and to explain how the immune system protects the body against these organisms. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 121 and BIO 161, No credit for Biology majors or minors.

BIO 122

INTRODUCTION TO PALEOBIOLOGY

This course focuses on the concepts and practices of paleobiology, the scientific study of the biology of extinct organisms preserved as fossils. No credit for Biology majors or minors

BIO 206

BIOSTATISTICS

A survey of a variety of statistical methods used to analyze biological data.
Prerequisites:
BIO 193 or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 100

OUR CHEMICAL WORLD

A course for non-science majors that develops the essential concepts of chemistry with some focus on applications of these methods and ideas toward a particular aspect of human activity or condition. Only one of series 100-102 may be taken for credit.

CHE 102

ATOMS AND MOLECULES

A course for non-science majors that develops the basic concepts of chemistry with discussion of some applications of chemical methods to the study of nature and the modification of the circumstances of human beings. The course may include a quantitative special project to enhance understanding of a particular application of chemistry. Only one of series 100-102 may be taken for credit.

CHE 104

CHEMICALS, DRUGS AND LIVING SYSTEMS

A discussion of the molecular basis of the interaction of specific chemical compounds (chiefly pharmaceuticals and drugs) with living organisms.

CHE 106

GEOCHEMISTRY

This course for non-science majors that introduces students to basic chemical and geological concepts through a discussion of the chemical principles and scientific laws governing the composition and chemical transformation of the components making up the Earth. Major topics include the scientific method, reporting and treatment of quantitative data, introduction to the basic principles of matter, chemical reactivity, and radioactive decay.

CSC 200

SURVEY OF COMPUTING

An introduction of various careers in the field ofinformation technology are explored. A hands-on component will deal withstate of the art personal computer operating systems, applications, databasesystems, Internet, email, and basic web site construction. The structure ofthe course utilizes both classroom lectures and computer classroom labs.This course is geared towards the non-major and assumes no prior knowledgeor experience in Computer Science.

CSC 211

PROGRAMMING IN JAVA I

Introduction to programming in Java and problem solving. Variables, data types, input/output, using objects and methods from the standard classes (such as String and Scanner), control structures, writing methods, arrays. Solving problems with algorithms and implementing algorithms in Java. (Not for CS majors)

CSC 212

PROGRAMMING IN JAVA II

Intermediate programming in Java and problem solving. Writing Java programs with multiple classes: constructors, visibility modifiers, static members, accessor and mutator methods, and arrays of objects. Inheritance, polymorphism, and interfaces. Sorting arrays of primitive data and arrays of objects. Exception handling. (Not for CS majors) PREREQUISITE(S): CSC 211.

CSC 231

BASIC COMPUTATION FOR BIOLOGY

This course is an introduction to the art of computational modeling of biological phenomena. It is primarily concerned with teaching basic skills needed to model a well-defined subset of our Universe. Modeling software like Matlab and spreadsheets will be the primary tools and no programming experience will be needed. (Other specialized software may be introduced and used as is economically feasible.) An important component of this course will be field trips to modern science and computational labs to ground students' knowledge in the phenomena being modeled and the art of modeling. PREREQUISITE(S): One quarter of Calculus or Graduate standing

CSC 233

CODES AND CIPHERS

This course is an introduction to the science and history of secret writing (cryptography) and how codes and ciphers can be broken (cryptanalysis). In historical settings we will encounter the main ideas and methods devised to secure communication channels. Possible topics include: substitution ciphers, transposition ciphers, the Vigenere cipher, statistical methods in cryptanalysis, public-key cryptography, and quantum cryptography. PREREQUISTE: LSP 120.

CSC 235

PROBLEM SOLVING

How do you solve a problem? In this course we discuss different problem solving techniques and strategies such as modeling, establishing subgoals, and searching and pruning. The techniques will be presented as part of a theoretical framework, but there will be significant emphasis on solving problems in familiar domains such as games, newspaper articles, philosophy, and simple geometry and logic. At the end of the course, students will have built a repertoire of problem solving tools that will allow them to make an informed choice of approach towards new problems.

CSC 239

PERSONAL COMPUTING

Students will learn how to develop Excel workbooks for computing elementary statistics and compute simple statistical inference (confidence intervals, hypothesis testing and linear regression models) using the data analysis toolkit. A variety of statistical, mathematical, logical, and text functions in Excel as well as the Excel Chart and Data features will be presented. Further, students will gain an introduction to web publishing, as the world wide web currently offers fast access to a huge audience for the presentation of research results. PREREQUISITE(S): Students are assumed to be familiar with Windows. MAT 130 or equivalent

CSC 250

COMPUTERS AND HUMAN INTELLIGENCE

Students taking this course will study human problem-solving and its simulation by computers. Artificial intelligence, pattern recognition and learning programs will be discussed. PREREQUISITE(S): Familiarity with basic computer productivity tools and the Web.

CSC 261

PROGRAMMING IN C++ I

This is an introductory course in computer programming covering basic data types, variables, flow of control, functions, and parameter passing, pointers and pass by reference, arrays, c strings and the C string library, basic input/output and structures. Examples in this course will concentrate on basic procedural algorithms for manipulating data.

CSC 262

PROGRAMMING IN C++ II

This is an intermediate programming course in C++, intended as a follow-up course to CSC 261. Topics include object-oriented programming, user-defined classes and objects, constructors, C++ memory management including pointers and dynamic allocation, copy constructors, destructors, and operator overloading. The course will also cover inheritance and polymorphism. Optional topics, as time allows, will include templates and the C++ Standard Template Library. PREREQUISITE(S): CSC 261

CSC 270

FROM FIREFLIES TO FACEBOOK: THE SCIENCE OF NETWORKS

This course explores complex systems both natural and man-made, characterized by the relationships between interacting entities. Network structures can be found in the Internet and its many applications, but also in social relationships, marketplaces, ecosystems, even cells. We will examine a wide range of networks including technological, social, and natural. Students will learn basic concepts from graph theory, algorithms and network analysis, apply tools for extracting, analyzing and visualizing network properties, using data sets drawn from a variety of areas. PREREQUISITE(S): LSP 120

ECT 250

INTERNET, COMMERCE, AND SOCIETY

An introduction of Internet technology, its application for commerce, and their social impact. This course surveys Internet technology, collaboration and commerce activities, digital media distribution, online communities, and social networking in the Internet environment.

ENV 101

INTRO TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE WITHOUT LAB

ENV 101 provides an overview of how the natural world works, how we interact with it and how we can work to protect, restore and sustain it for the future. Topics include an overview of basic ecological principles, population, biodiversity, energy, natural resources and pollution. The course emphasis is on the science behind current environmental concerns. Social, ethical, economic, and political perspectives are considered in order to provide perspective and a fuller understanding of the issues and their solutions. Students cannot receive credit for both ENV 101 and ENV 102.

ENV 116

GEOLOGY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

An examination of the earth's materials and structures, and the processes responsible for their formation; how geologic processes and hazards influence human activities (and vice versa); and a discussion of geologic aspects of waste disposal and pollution. Students cannot receive credit for both ENV 115 and ENV 116.

ENV 200

CITIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

This course focuses on the interactions between urban areas and the environment. It is a discussion of the physical setting of cities; the water, energy, air and waste disposal needs of urban areas; and the effects of urban areas on the air, water and land environment.

ENV 202

RESOURCES, POPULATION, AND THE ENVIRONMENT

A course on the relationship between the exploitation of the biological, mineral and energy resources of the earth to support an increasing population, and the environmental effects of this development. To provide an overview of the current debate on the relationship between the growing human population worldwide, the natural resources required to sustain this population, and the consequences of resource exploitation for managing environmental quality. We will integrate the ecological, economic, and policy factors involved in natural resource management.

ENV 204

ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

This course is designed to provide students with the scientific tools necessary to understand and critically evaluate both personal and policy decisions regarding the variety of options (e.g. fossil fuel, solar, wind, etc.) for energy generation and use. The course also focuses on the environmental impacts of all forms of energy, from the extraction of fossil fuels and mineral resources from the earth, to the generation, distribution and consumption of energy, and ultimately emission of fossil fuel combustion products, notably carbon dioxide and other heat trapping gasses, to the atmosphere. Course fee applies.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 230

GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE

This course introduces the student to the general principles of climate change and how it affects weather, agriculture, ocean levels, etc. In recent years, the problem of global climate change became one of the most important issues in science and politics. This course will cover topics like natural and human made climate changes, the handling of proxy data and data methods, and social behavior.

TDC 261

BASIC COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS

(Formerly TDC 361) Introduction to voice, data, and multi-media network communications fundamentals. Wired, Wireless, and Optical applications in Local, Metropolitan, Wide Area Networks are explored. The overview explains how technical, regulatory, competitive, standardization and cultural factors impact modern network applications. Approved for Scientific Inquiry credit. PREREQUISITE(S): NONE.

SOC 224

INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL REASONING

Introduction to statistics including data description and statistical inference used in many scientific fields of knowledge. Introduces students to computers in statistical analysis with examples drawn from social and natural sciences.

SNC 193

THE SCIENCE OF SEXUAL ORIENTATION

This course will engage you in scientific inquiry on the nature of sexual orientation. You will be challenged to master the scientific content of leading programs of research on twins, brain and other anatomical structures, hormones, genetic linkages, birth-order, and animal behavior through assigned readings, lectures, and multimedia resources. Moreover, you will also engage in the scientific process through a collaborative research project concerning an aspect of sexual orientation that leads you through the steps of stating a question, designing a study, collecting and analyzing data, and interpreting the results. You will also develop skills in identifying the limits to particular forms of scientific inquiry by recognizing the constraints of methods, sources of bias, reliability of results, and certainty of conclusions. This course will encourage you to place the modern research within ethical and social contexts in which to make judgments about the potential relevance and impacts of scientific knowledge about sexual orientation. Scientific Inquiry [SI]
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 is a prerequisite for this class.

PSY 241

RESEARCH METHODS I

Introduction to methods of psychological research to enable students to become more sophisticated consumers of research information. Students will learn and apply basic methodological concepts and skills. Students will conduct a non-experimental research project, analyze the data, and write a paper based on the project. PSY 241 and PSY 242 may be taken in either order; one is not a prerequisite for the other.
Prerequisites:
(PSY 105 or PSY 106) and (PSY 240 or MAT 242 or SOC 279 or MAT 137) are a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 225

WEATHER AND CLIMATE

Develops the physical concepts needed to understand the atmosphere, the oceans, and their interactions with the aim of building a conceptual model of weather and climate. Long-term climate variability and climate related environmental issues are also discussed. Cross-listed with GEO 225.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this course,

PHY 220

THE DYNAMIC OCEAN

Develops the concepts of physical oceanography. Topics include the chemical and physical properties of seawater, the dynamics of ocean currents and circulations, the physics of water waves and tides, the interaction of the ocean with the atmosphere, the formation of coastlines, and the effects of pollution on the ocean. Cross-listed with GEO 220.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this course,

PHY 205

EINSTEIN'S PECULIAR IDEAS

A conceptual treatment of Einstein's groundbreaking ideas about space, time, and the nature of reality. Topics covered include special relativity, Einstein's contributions to quantum physics, including his criticisms of its orthodox interpretation, and some aspects of his theory of gravity. Aspects of Einstein's thoughts on social issues will also be briefly discussed.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this course,

PHY 204

FRONTIERS OF THE UNIVERSE

Focuses on the tremendous increase in our understanding of the universe beyond the Solar System that has occurred in recent years. Topics include stellar evolution, the properties of stars, supernova explosions, black holes, galaxies, and the origin of the universe.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this course,

PHY 120

HOW THINGS WORK

This course will develop an understanding of the physics of everyday objects and experiences such as bouncing balls, roller coasters, balloons, thermostats, violins, microwave ovens and sun glasses. The relevant physics concepts will be introduced through demonstrations and simple experiments.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this course,

PHY 104

THE SUN & ITS PLANETS

This course focuses on the development of our knowledge about the Solar System with an emphasis on the origin, structure and motion of the planets and the Sun. Topics include both historical astronomy and our current understanding based on information from spacecraft sent to other planets. Cannot receive credit for both PHY 104 and PHY 114. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this course,

PHY 236

THE SCIENCE OF DIGITAL AUDIO

Introduction to the physics and mathematics of digital audio, including the conversion of sound energy into electrical signals, the digitization of the signal, conversion of the signal to a standard format, storage of the signal on a hard disk or a CD, and manipulation of the digitized signal. Also includes a discussion of the ethics and legality of downloading digitized audio, in the context of intellectual property rights. This course assumes familiarity with trigonometric mathematical functions.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this course,

NSG 200

HEALTH AND NUTRITION

This course provides an introduction to the complex interactions between nutrition, exercise, genetics, cultural factors, physiological and psychological stressors and health. Each class provides an overview on the various nutritional factors which influence the health of individuals. A population based approach is used to address the issue of world hunger and undernutrition. Multiple perspectives relating to nutrition are included such as cultural, religious, family and alternative nutritional lifestyles.

MAT 172

CALCULUS III WITH DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

This course is designed for students in the life sciences and covers some topics from MAT 152, differential equations and an introduction to the Calculus of functions of several variables. Specific topics are as follows. Numerical integration, partial fraction expansions, Taylor approximations of a function, differential equations, separation of variables, slope fields, Euler's existence theorem, polygonal approximations to solutions of differential equations, the logistic equation and allometric growth models, equilibiria of differential equations and their stability, applications of stability theory, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, directional derivative and the gradient. Course meets for an additional lab session each week during which time students will work on applied mathematics projects based on the topics covered in the course.
Prerequisites:
MAT 151 or MAT 161 or MAT 171 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 171

CALCULUS II WITH SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS

The course covers the following topics using examples from the sciences: Applications of the derivative including approximation and local linearity, differentials, extrema and the Mean Value Theorem, monotonicity and concavity, extrema, inflection points, graphing, L'Hospital's Rule, optimization, and the Newton-Raphson method, antiderivaties, the definite integral, Riemann sums, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, area, cumulative change, average value of a function, and techniques of integration: substitution rule and integration by parts. Course meets for an additional lab session each week during which time students will work on applied mathematics projects based on the topics covered in the course. Course meets for an additional lab session each week during which time students will work on applied mathematics projects based on the topics covered in the course.
Prerequisites:
MAT 150 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 170

CALCULUS I WITH SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS

The course covers the following topics using examples from the sciences: Functions as models, logarithmic scale graphing, exponential growth and decay, difference equations and limits of sequences, geometric series, functions and limits, trigonometric functions and their limits, continuity, limits at infinity, the derivative, differentiation rules, derivatives of trigonometric and exponential functions, related rates, derivatives of inverse and logarithm functions. Course meets for an additional lab session each week during which time students will work on applied mathematics projects based on the topics covered in the course. Students majoring in the sciences should consult with their major department to decide between the 160 and 170 sequences.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 162

CALCULUS FOR MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE MAJORS III

L'Hopital's rule, improper integrals, sequences and series, Taylor polynomials. Course meets for an additional 1.5 hour lab session each week in order to cover the material in greater depth.
Prerequisites:
MAT 151 or MAT 161 or MAT 171 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 161

CALCULUS FOR MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE MAJORS II

Definite and indefinite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, applications of the integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse trigonometric functions, techniques of integration. Course meets for an additional 1.5 hour lab session each week in order to cover the material in greater depth.
Prerequisites:
MAT 150 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a prerequisite for this course.

MAT 160

CALCULUS FOR MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE MAJORS I

Limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, extrema, curve sketching, and optimization. Course meets for an additional 1.5 hour lab session each week in order to cover the material in greater depth. Students considering a math major are advised to take the 160 or 170 sequence.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 152

CALCULUS III

L'Hopital's rule, improper integrals, sequences and series, Taylor polynomials. This course meets for an additional 1.5-hour lab session each week for enrichment and problem solving.
Prerequisites:
MAT 151 or MAT 161 or MAT 171 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 151

CALCULUS II

Definite and indefinite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, applications of the integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse trigonometric functions, techniques of integration. This course meets for an additional 1.5-hour lab session each week for enrichment and problem solving.
Prerequisites:
MAT 150 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 150

CALCULUS I

Limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, extrema, curve sketching, and optimization. This course meets for an additional 1.5-hour lab session each week for enrichment and problem solving.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this course.

MAT 149

CALCULUS WITH INTEGRATED PRECALCULUS III

Techniques of integration, L'Hopital's rule, improper integrals, Taylor polynomials, series and sequences, first-order differential equations, with precalculus review included for each topic.
Prerequisites:
MAT 148 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 148

CALCULUS WITH INTEGRATED PRECALCULUS II

Extrema, curve sketching, related rates, definite and indefinite integrals, applications of the integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, with precalculus review included for each topic.
Prerequisites:
MAT 147 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 147

CALCULUS WITH INTEGRATED PRECALCULUS I

Limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, and applications, with precalculus review included for each topic. The full MAT 147-8-9 sequence covers all the material of MAT 150-1-2 plus additional precalculus material.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or equivalents or placement by test is a prerequisite for this course.

MAT 137

BUSINESS STATISTICS

Basic concepts of statistics and applications; data analysis with the use of Excel; theoretical distributions; sampling distributions; problems of estimation; hypothesis testing; problems of sampling; linear regression and correlation.
Prerequisites:
MAT 136 or equivalent is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 135

BUSINESS CALCULUS I

Differential calculus of one or more variables with business applications.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or equivalent is a prerequisite for this class.

IM 222

INFORMATION VISUALIZATION

This course discusses the basic problems and techniques of visualizing quantitative and qualitative data. Topics include: perception, types of information, representation of univariate and multivariate data and relational information, analysis of representations, presentation, and dynamic and interactive visualizations. Students will create visualizations using graphical software PREREQUISITES: LSP 120

IT 263

APPLIED NETWORKS AND SECURITY

This course introduces the networking and security technologies required to build and maintain a home or small-office network. Networking topics will include client/server application software configuration, network connectivity (cabling, switch and router configuration), basic IP addressing, network address translation and options for public Internet access services. Security topics will include typical threats and responses, firewalls, host hardening, password management and virtual private network (VPNs). The course has a lab component where students apply wired and wireless technologies to design and administer a small network with various applications. PREREQUISITE(S): none

IT 240

INTRODUCTION TO DATABASES

This course will introduce students to the design, implementation and use of desktop databases. Major topics include: modeling using ER diagrams, creating and maintaining a database using a PC based application, compose and use queries in Structured Query Language, create and customize forms and reports, and integrate databases with other sources of data and applications. PREREQUISITE(S): NONE

IT 223

DATA ANALYSIS

(FORMERLY CSC 323) Application of statistical concepts and techniques to a variety of problems in IT areas and other disciplines, using a statistical package for simple data analysis. Course topics include descriptive statistics, elementary probability rules, sampling, distributions, confidence intervals, correlation, regression and hypothesis testing. PREREQUISITE(S): MAT 130 or placement

IT 130

INTRODUCTORY COMPUTING FOR THE WEB

An introduction to the Internet, the World Wide Web, and web development for students with a strong interest in technology. Students will create interactive web pages by writing HTML and CSS and by programming in JavaScript. Topics include the origins of the web, the roles and operations of web browsers and web servers, interacting with web applications through forms, and using style sheets to separate document structure and document formatting. PREREQUISITE(S): NONE.

HCI 201

MULTIMEDIA AND THE WORLD WIDE WEB

An introduction to the World Wide Web and web development for non-technical majors. Students will create web pages using a WYSIWYG editor. Students will evaluate web sites using a variety of analytical and empirical methods. Students will conduct technology-related experiments following the principles of the scientific method and use technology to analyze their results. Topics include web-based technology, creating content for distribution on the web, and design principles for web sites. Students will develop an appreciation for the connections among science, mathematics, and technology in modern society, as well as for the principles guiding advances in science and technology. PREREQUISITE(S): NONE.

GEO 243

REMOTE SENSING

An introduction to the fundamentals of remote sensing, the analysis of the earth through air or space borne sensors. Special topics include image interpretation, image processing, urban change analysis, environmental monitoring, and photogrammetry. Instruction is accomplished through lectures and hands-on lab exercises using ArcGIS Desktop. A comprehensive final project using techniques learned from your work completes the course.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course,

GEO 241

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS I

An introductory-level course covering the fundamentals of GIS. Topics include GPS, remote sensing, data models (vector and raster), coordinate systems, and map design. Instruction is accomplished through lectures and hands-on computer lab exercises using ArcGIS.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course,

GEO 225

WEATHER AND CLIMATE

The dynamic atmospheric processes which control day-to-day weather and the longer term processes which determine prevailing climatic conditions are the two principal foci of this course. Special topics include weather systems, climate change, global warming, and human impacts on climate. Cross-listed with PHY 225.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this course,

GEO 210

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION

This course explores society-environment relations in case studies drawn from around the world. The course focuses on forces destructive to habitat and biospheres, species loss, global warming, and the tension between "modernization" and environmental sustainability.

GEO 101

EARTH'S PHYSICAL LANDSCAPE: LITHOSPHERE, HYDROSPHERE, BIOSPHERE

An introduction to the spatial aspects of the Geosystem consisting of the inter-related systems of the Atmosphere (air), Lithosphere (solid earth), Hydrosphere (water), and the Biosphere (living organisms).

BIO 162

THE BRAIN: BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR

Explores basic concepts in neurobiology, including the organization and evolution of the vertebrate system, how the nervous system sends messages through the body and how these messages are translated into the variety of human behaviors. Alterations in behavior due to brain disease or injury is also discussed. The laboratory elaborates on lecture material and provides insight into how scientific reasoning and testing can help to discover how the brain works. Lab fee. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 126 and BIO 162. Formerly BIO 239. No credit for Biology majors or minors

BIO 163

PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY

The course is designed to introduce the student to several important principles of Biology, including aspects of cell biology, genetics, ecology, development, and evolution. The course will involve labs on each of these topics as they are addressed, requiring the student to accumulate and analyze data and to be involved in summarizing and presenting this data to the class. Lab fee. Formerly BIO 256. No credit for Biology majors or minors

BIO 164

AVIAN BIOLOGY

A foundation in the study, knowledge, and appreciation of birds. Use of field techniques to monitor and measure free-ranging bird populations in an experiential learning situation. Contributes to understanding of interaction and interdependency of nature through study of avian life. No credit for Biology majors or minors Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
Junior or Senior standing is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 131

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY

Laboratory course to be taken in conjunction with CHE 130. The course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE130. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE130. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or (CHE 128 and CHE 129) is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 132

GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

Second course of three in the General Chemistry series. Topics discussed include: common states of matter, phase transitions, properties of solutions, kinetics and equilibrium. This course meets for three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE133.
Prerequisites:
CHE 130 and CHE 131 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 133

GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 132. The Course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques learned in lab provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE132. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 132. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
CHE 130 and 131 are a prerequisite for this class.

STEM 230

INTRODUCTION TO EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE

This course provides an overview of the dynamic geological nature of Earth, its place in the solar system and universe, and the fundamental Earth-sky-human relationship. The format of the course is lecture, discussion, laboratory activities, and student group presentations. The course content is aligned with the Illinois Earth and Space Science Content Area Standards for educators and thus also meets the needs of secondary education majors wishing to pass the Illinois state exam for certification in earth and space science. LSP 120 or HON 180 is recommended. Fomerly SDV 230.

STEM 231

INTRODUCTION TO EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE (WITHOUT LAB)

This course provides an overview of the dynamic geological nature of Earth, its place in the solar system and universe, and the fundamental Earth-sky-human relationship. Students will develop an understanding of 1) the processes that shape Earth's surface and interior over geologic time, 2) the formation, evolution, and physical properties of the sun and its planets, asteroids, and comets, 3) the physical basis for phenomena such as eclipses, phases, and seasons, 4) the formation, evolution, and properties of stars, galaxies, and the universe, 5) the historical progression of human understanding of Earth's geologic history and its place in space and time, and 6) the associated technologies that have enabled this progression. Students will encounter several historical examples that illustrate the provisional nature of science and the interaction of experiment, observation, and theory. The format of the course is lectures, discussions, laboratory activities, and student group presentations.Formerly SDV 231.

BIO 123

INHERITANCE IN HUMANS

An examination of genetics in the human species, including the inheritance of ordinary traits, genetic diseases, and those complex attributes to which inheritance contributes, such as behavior and intelligence. Formerly BIO 203. No credit for Biology majors or minors

BIO 124

VERTEBRATES: DIVERSITY AND EVOLUTION

Examines vertebrate diversity and the interrelationships among vertebrate groups including humans. The quantitative component will include several data processing exercises that address: 1) how vertebrates are related and how those relationships are determined using phylogenetic trees, 2) species descriptions and analyzing morphological differences among species and 3) graphical interpretations. Formerly BIO 204.

BIO 128

STRESS, HORMONES AND THE NERVOUS SYSTEM

A study and discussion of the basic concepts of stress and stressors, and their effects on the functioning of the Nervous System, the Endocrine System and the Immune System; the feedback influence of hormones and neurochemicals on cerebral processing, and the relation of these phenomena to health and behavioral medicine. Formerly BIO 208. No credit for Biology majors or minors

BIO 132

MEDICAL TESTS AND TRIALS

Is fiber good for you? Are cell phones bad? Participants in this course will learn how to analyze popular health claims and medical studies using a computer spreadsheet (Excel). Topics include: design of health studies, data collection, statistical analysis, common biases and errors, and sources of health data on the World Wide Web. Formerly BIO 212. No credit for Biology majors or minors
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 134

HOW THE HUMAN BODY WORKS

Fundamentals of human body functions through an examination of organs and organ systems. The quantitative component of this course will explore the concepts of scientific discovery through structured out-of-class projects. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 202 and BIO 134. Formerly BIO 224. No credit for Biology majors or minors
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CHE 134

GENERAL CHEMISTRY III

Third of three courses in the General Chemistry sequence. Topics included in lecture: chemical equilibrium in aqueous solution (acids and bases, solubility, complex ion formation), Thermodynamics (entropy and free energy), electrochemistry, chemistry of d-block elements and descriptive chemistry. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE135.
Prerequisites:
CHE 132 and CHE 133 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 135

GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY III

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 134. The Course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE134. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 134. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
CHE 132 and CHE 133 are a prerequisite for this class.

ISM 222

INFORMATION VISUALIZATION

This course discusses the basic problems and techniques of visualizing quantitative and qualitative data. Topics include: perception, types of information, representation of univariate and multivariate data and relational information, analysis of representations, presentation, and dynamic and interactive visualizations. Students will create visualizations using graphical software PREREQUISITES: LSP 120