Catalog Version

Summer/Autumn 2013
Catalog update:
May 15, 2013

Access archived catalogs in the Catalog Archive section.​​​​​

Students are required to follow the Academic Handbook and Code of Student Responsibility

Courses in the Understanding the Past domain study human life in past societies (primarily pre-1945) as a process of continuity and change over time. Many of the documents that mediate the past to us have considerable aesthetic or intellectual value in and of themselves. However, courses in this learning domain examine texts, art works, and other forms of evidence less for their aesthetic or intellectual value than for their usefulness as tools for reconstructing aspects of the past and building sensible, defensible, and well-informed historical interpretations about the past and about causation in the past. Students generally take two courses in the UP Domain Area.

Courses

Below please find examples of courses previously offered for understanding the past domain credit. For information on current offerings, please consult Campus Connection.

American Studies

Anthropology

Asian American Studies

Catholic Studies

Comparative Literature

Computer Games Development

Economics

Geography

Graphic Design

History

Intercultural Communication

    Journalism

    Latin American and Latino Studies

    Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer Studies

    Media and Cinema Studies

    Sociology

    AMS 200

    INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN SOCIAL HISTORY AND CULTURE

    This course will provide an overview of American History designed to provide a one-quarter overview of American history and culture. It will provide an overview of the central themes of American History from the colonial period to the present with a focus on social, popular, and cultural history.

    AMS 261

    AMERICAN ETHNICITIES 1800-1945

    This course will be an exploration of the development of American ethnic communities and identities in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Students will examine the American experience through the lens of ethnic groups and racialized ethnic populations and consider how ethnicity has shaped and influenced American history. We will study the experiences of American ethnic groups based on historical, social, and poltical factors such as immigration and citizenship, slavery and racialization, gender and patriarchy, religion and family, and the relationships between and among ethnic groups.

    AMS 276

    HISTORY OF SEX IN AMERICA 2: LATE VICTORIANS TO THE PRESENT

    This course will provide an overview of the history of American sexuality from the late nineteenth century to the present.

    AMS 395

    TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES

    Topics in American Studies.

    ANT 103

    ARCHAEOLOGY

    An exploration of the science of archaeology, the study of past human behavior through material remains. Examines the ways archaeologists gather data and the methods used to analyze and interpret these data to learn about the past and how human societies evolved.

    AAS 200

    ASIAN AMERICAN HISTORY

    This course examines the creation of Asian America by first and second-generation Asian migrants to the Americans from the 1840s to World War II. The course provides a historical, legal, social and cultural framework for understanding the resurgence of Asian migration since the 1960s.

    CTH 228

    MEDIEVAL MYSTICS IN EUROPE: 1000-1600 A.D.

    The evolution of theories and experiences of human union with God, and of varied Christian spiritual paths and practices as described in mystical literature, saint's lives, religious art and music. Emphasis on the monastic, urban and courtly institutional context of the documents. Cross-listed with HST 213.

    CTH 273

    HISTORY OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN THE U.S.

    This course traces the developments of the Catholic Church from the missionary enterprise to the position of a major social, political and economic institution. The course will examine the manner in which the hierarchical institution of the Catholic Church has related to the Liberal ideal of American Democracy. Cross-listed with HST 243.

    CTH 275

    MEDIEVAL PEOPLE: 400 TO 1400 A.D.

    The important components of European society during the Middle Ages, including rulers, knights, and peasants, churchmen and nuns, urban merchants, intellectuals, and artisans. Who were these Medieval people, what differentiated them, how did they interact with each other, and how and why did these interactions change over time? Cross-listed with HST 210.

    CTH 289

    IRELAND, 1800 - 2000

    Survey of Irish history from 1800 to 2000. Examines the course of Irish history from the Act of Union (creating the United Kingdom), through the struggles and reforms of the 19th century (Catholic Emancipation, the Famine and Irish diaspora, Fenianism, Land Reform and Home Rule), to the creation of the modern nation-state of the 20th century (the Easter Rising, partition and civil war, the role of Eamon deValera, the Republic, and the Troubles). Topics include the contributions of Irish culture and its influence in Europe and the world.

    GAM 206

    HISTORY OF GAMES

    From "The Royal Game of Ur" (2500+ BCE) to "World of Warcraft" (2004), games have been a constant in human history. The forms of games, their experiential qualities, and their cultural significance have varied enormously from era to era and place to place. This class will examine particular games and game genres in their historical context using a case study format. We will focus on "indoor" games, those of chance and skill, as opposed to physical games and sports. The examples will be chosen (i) to have global scope and historic diversity, (ii) to relate to games that students will find familiar, and (iii) to raise particular issues in historical interpretation, the use of primary sources and changing concepts of leisure activity. PREQUISITE(S): NONE.

    ECO 316

    EUROPEAN ECONOMIC HISTORY

    European Economic History. Major factors and institutions which have influenced the economic development of European nations. Impact of these nations on U.S. development is also discussed.
    Prerequisites:
    ECO 105, ECO 106 and (MAT 130 or equivalent) are a prerequisite for this class.

    ECO 317

    AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY

    This course addresses the major factors and institutions which have influenced the economic development of the United States, including differences in regional development, slavery, transportation improvements, western expansion, the rise of large scale business, and government policy responses.
    Prerequisites:
    ECO 105, ECO 106 and (MAT 130 or equivalent) are a prerequisite for this class.

    ECO 340

    DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT

    A study of the most influential contributions to our understanding of political economy broadly understood. An historical examination of the development of economic theories with special emphasis placed upon their relevance to present economic and political issues.
    Prerequisites:
    (ECO 105 or ECO 106), ECO 306 and (MAT 130 or equivalent) are a prerequisite for this class.

    GEO 218

    SPAIN AND PORTUGAL: THE IBERIAN IMPACT

    An historical-geographical analysis of the Iberian nations with an interdisciplinary focus on global geopolitics, trade, settlement, and cultural characteristics (art, architecture, language and literature, music and religion). This is the only course of its kind offered in U.S. universities. Formerly GEO 318

    GEO 233

    COMPARATIVE URBANISM

    An exploration of non-U.S. urban and planning traditions, through the urban morphological and comparative study of the foundation, and social-political forces that shaped cities such as Paris, St. Petersburg, Istanbul, Bombay-Mumbai, Hong Kong, and Mexico City.

    GPH 205

    HISTORICAL FOUNDATIONS OF VISUAL TECHNOLOGY

    This course is a survey of the development, application and meaning of visual technologies in a wide range of world cultures from pre-history to the present. It traces the unique intersection of mathematics and physical culture that marks design science, as it has been realized in a variety of human societies. The course includes works of art that emphasize those mathematical and geometric elements that are antecedent to contemporary graphic technology.

    HST 111

    THE WORLD TO C.1500

    This course will examine the phenomenon of civilization as experienced by West Asian, South Asian, East Asian, African, European, and Pre-Columbian American societies to 1500 A.D. Formerly HST 218.

    HST 112

    THE WORLD, C.1500-1914

    This course will examine the global integration of all societies from 1500 A.D. to World War I. Formerly HST 219.

    HST 113

    THE WORLD, 1900-PRESENT

    A survey of the political, cultural, and technological developments of the years since 1900, concentrating on the growth of a single world-wide civilization and on the changing international balance of military, political and economic power. Formerly HST 220.

    HST 121

    LATIN AMERICA TO C. 1765: PRE-COLUMBIAN SOCIETIES AND THE COLONIAL PERIOD

    A survey of Latin American history that offers a continental approach to the colonial period. Special attention is given to Native American societies before 1492, to the Spanish conquest of Mexico and Peru, to the trade in African slaves (Spanish and Portuguese colonies), and to issues of race, class, and gender during the colonial period.

    HST 122

    LATIN AMERICA, 1765-1914: THE LONG 19TH CENTURY

    One of the main goals of this course is for students to determine whether the long 19th century was an era of revolution and social change or a continuation of colonial institutions and policies. To address this broad question, the course focuses on the Bourbon Reforms, the Wars of Independence, the problems associated with nation building, and the neo-colonial order. Through the analysis of some individual countries (for example Mexico, Argentina, and Brazil) students will study key issues like slavery, the "India question," race relations, class formation, social inequalities, authoritarianism, Church-State relations, liberalism, subaltern resistance, and North-South relations.

    HST 131

    AFRICA TO 1800

    A study of African history from earliest times, concentrating on the political, social and religious aspects of major African states and empires. Formerly HST 227.

    HST 132

    AFRICA, 1750-1900

    The Age of Conquest. The origins of Afro-European relations and the political, economic and military causes of the European partition and occupation of the continent. Formerly HST 228.

    HST 133

    AFRICA, 1900-PRESENT

    The workings of the colonial system, the rise and course of independence movements, and the history of individual African states since independence. Formerly HST 229.

    HST 141

    THE MUSLIM WORLD, C. 600 CE TO 1100

    Foundation of First Global Civilization (600-1100). A study of the emergence of Islam and the growth of the Islamic community from the time of the Prophet Muhammad until the end of the eleventh century. Formerly HST 223.

    HST 142

    THE MUSLIM WORLD, 1000-1500

    Sultans, Khans and Shaykhs: Medieval Islamic History (1000-1500). A survey of Muslim history from the decline of the Arab caliphate to the rise of the great gunpowder empires, addressing themes of political expansion, military slavery, devastation brought about by the twin plagues of the Mongols and the Black Death, and the growth of Islamic mysticism. Formerly HST 224.

    HST 143

    THE MUSLIM WORLD, 1400-1920

    Great Empires (1400-1920). Examines the social, cultural and economic histories of the Ottoman-Turkish, Safavid Iranian and Mughal-Indian empires which dominated the Muslim world in the crucial centuries between the end of the Mongol empire and the advent of European dominance. Formerly HST 225.

    HST 151

    SOUTH ASIA TO C. 900 C.E.

    The course follows the development of the history of the region from the earliest phases of human settlement, the first civilization in the Indus valley, and the formation of the Mauryan and Gupta empires. It will analyze the growth of different state structures from tribal/lineage based state to these great empires. It incorporates the rise of regional states and the growing importance of trade to linking South Asia with the West. It will also examine the development of different religious traditions from Vedic Brahmanism to Buddhism to Jainism and the very early days of Islam in the region. The central question of this course will be how to contextualize the relationship between structures like family, law, caste, community, state and the tumultuous changes in the subcontinent over this long period. Formerly HST 256.

    HST 152

    SOUTH ASIA, C. 900 CE TO 1707

    The course begins with the transformation of society from the 'ancient' to the 'medieval', and compares it to developments in Europe in the feudal age. It then incorporates specific developments in South Asia: political, social, cultural; that came about with the establishment of powerful Islamic states in a region where Muslims were a minority. These issues will inform the analysis of the Ghaznavid and Ghurid invasions, the Delhi Sultanate, the Vijayanagara empire and the Mughal empire. The course will end with the Marathas and the decline of the Mughal empire, and the rising influence of the British. The central themes concern how the state, economy, culture, and society developed in the period when Islam became firmly embedded in South Asia.

    HST 153

    SOUTH ASIA, 1707-1947

    The course begins with the decline of the Mughal Empire, and then moves to examine the British empire, the nationalist movement and finally to independence and partition in 1947. The central questions of this course continue to be relevant in the post-colonial period: how we understand the distinctive form of modernity that has developed in South Asia. Taking a comparative approach as often as possible, the course examines the fundamental ways that Britain was as transformed by the development of its empire as was colonial India. The course constantly deconstructs easy binaries of self and others/ East and West by examining the differences within Indian and British society. Formerly HST 257.

    HST 161

    EAST ASIA TO C. 1200

    Outlines the history of the region (China, Korea and Japan) during the period of antiquity. Follows the development and the formation of dynastic rule in China and Korea and the imperial institution in Japan. Assesses the extent of the role of ancient Chinese philosophy, language, and statecraft in establishing a coherent region we now call "East Asia."

    HST 162

    EAST ASIA c. 1200 TO 1800

    Begins with the transition of East Asia (China, Korea and Japan) from ancient to medieval society and compares it to developments in Europe during the feudal age. Explores the political, economic and cultural relations between the various states in the region as a whole as well as the specific local developments of state and society during this period. Examines the arrival of the first Europeans, traders and then Jesuit and Catholic missionaries, and the resulting radical social realignment within each society stemming from this encounter with the 'outside.'

    HST 163

    EAST ASIA , c.1800-PRESENT

    Begins with the reshaping of East Asian relations from the late 18th century following the realignment of the region after the expulsion of European Catholic missionaries. Follows the radical shift in the relations between these countries as they all sought to respond to the imperial challenges that the West imposed. Explores the central role of Japan and its effort to build an empire in and beyond East Asia from the late 19th century through its defeat in World War II and the lasting historical legacy of that history in the region.

    HST 171

    EUROPE, 400-1400

    The important components of European society during the Middle Ages, including rulers, knights, and peasants, churchmen and nuns, urban merchants, intellectuals, and artisans. Who were these Medieval people, what differentiated them, how did they interact with each other, and how and why did these interactions change over time? Formerly HST 210.

    HST 172

    EUROPE, 1348-1789

    The development of new European ideologies in a time of heightened political and social conflict, from the rebirth of ancient culture in Renaissance Italy, to the religious debates of the Protestant Reformation; from the theories of absolute monarchy to the early revolutionary ideologies of the Enlightenment. Formerly HST 211.

    HST 173

    EUROPE, 1789-PRESENT

    A survey of European history from 1789 to the present. Formerly HST 217.

    HST 181

    UNITED STATES TO 1800

    A survey of the major social, political, economic and cultural themes in U.S. History from the earliest European settlements to the aftermath of the Revolution. Formerly HST 280.

    HST 182

    UNITED STATES, 1800-1900

    A survey of the major social, political, economic and cultural themes in U.S. history from the aftermath of the Revolution to the Spanish-American War. Formerly HST 281.

    HST 183

    UNITED STATES, 1900-PRESENT

    A survey of the major social, political, economic and cultural themes in U.S. history from the Progressive era to the present. Formerly HST 282.

    HST 200

    MEXICO AFTER INDEPENDENCE

    This survey covers the history of Mexico from 1821 to the present. It will examine the difficulties of nation-building during the 19th Century, the Mexican Revolution (1910-1940), and the success and failure of the "Mexican Miracle."

    HST 204

    FILM AND LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY

    An inquiry into the way film portrays historical events in Latin America.

    HST 206

    MEXICO: FROM THE OLMECS TO INDEPENDENCE

    This course surveys the history of Mexico from the rise of the Olmec Civilization to Mexican Independence in 1821. It will examine the rise, fall, and continuities of Mesoamerican civilizations, the Spanish conquest, and the creation of the colonial order.

    HST 208

    IMPERIAL RUSSIA

    This course examines political, economic, social, and cultural developments in Russia form the time of Peter the Great in the early 18th century to the collapse of tsarism in 1917. Topics include Westernization and resistance during the reigns of Peter the Great and Catherine the Great; reform and reaction under Alexander I and Nicholas I; Alexander II and the great reforms of the 1860's; industrialization and the transformation of Russian society in the second half of the nineteenth century; the rise of radicalism and emergence of revolutionary movements; and the revolutions of 1905 and February 1917.

    HST 209

    THE RISE AND FALL OF THE SOVIET UNION

    This course examines major political, social, economic, and cultural developments in twentieth-century Russia form the collapse of tsarist rule through the fall of communism. Topics include the rise of Bolshevism and the October Revolution; the Civil War and allied intervention; the period of NEP and "revolutionary dreaming;" Stalin and Stalinism; the Great Patriotic War; Khrushchev and the "thaw," Brezhnev and "developed socialism," and the rise and fall of Mikhail Gorbachev.

    HST 212

    MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE WOMEN

    Gender roles and ideologies in pre-modern and early modern Europe, from ancient Mediterranean and Germanic women to high Medieval ladies, nuns, serfs, and city women, from early feminism to the restrictions and opportunities brought by the Renaissance and Reformation. Emphasis on primary sources, especially women's writings.

    HST 213

    MEDIEVAL MYSTICS IN EUROPE: 1000-1600 AD

    The evolution over time of theories and experiences of human union with God, and of varied Christian spiritual paths and practices, as described in mystical literature, saints' lives, religious art, and music. Emphasis on the monastic, urban, and courtly institutional contexts of the documents. Cross-listed as CTH 228

    HST 214

    EASTERN EUROPE TO 1699

    A survey of the area's settlements by Slavic and non-Slavic peoples, the establishment of medieval states, the East European Renaissance and Reformation, the struggle of Cross and Crescent, and the growth of Habsburg and Ottoman power.

    HST 215

    EASTERN EUROPE: 1699 TO 1914

    A survey of the East European Enlightenment and absolutism, the Polish Partitions, and the effects of revolutionary ideas on multinational empires.

    HST 216

    EASTERN EUROPE: 1914-PRESENT

    A survey of World War I and its effects in Eastern Europe; the rise of nation-states; the destruction of traditional agrarian societies; the impact of World War II; and the establishment and decline of Communist regimes.

    HST 221

    EARLY RUSSIA

    This course examines political, economic, social, and cultural developments in Russia from the emergence of the Kievan state in the ninth century to the reign of Peter the Great in the early eighteenth century. Topics include the rise and fall of Kiev; the Mongol invasion and rule by the "Golden Horde;" the rise of Moscow and unification of Great Russia; the consolidation of tsarist authority and the reign of Ivan the Terrible; the Time of Troubles; and the early Romanov dynasty.

    HST 222

    MODERN GERMANY, 1870-PRESENT

    Following the path from Germany's unification in the late 19th century via two world wars, the country's division in the course of the Cold War, and ultimately the country's reunification at the close of the 20th century, one of the goals of this course is to introduce students to the major cornerstones of modern German history. Another objective, however, aims at using these events in the exploration of shifting ideas about what it has meant to be German, exploring what factors determined inclusion in or exclusion from the German community.

    HST 226

    ISLAM AND THE WEST: A SURVEY OF ORIENTALISM

    From "heresy" to "the Green Threat," this course studies the changing perceptions of Islam and the Islamic world held by those in "Western" societies from the time of the Crusades down to the contemporary era.

    HST 232

    CULTURE AND POLITICS IN IMPERIAL CHINA

    Examines the history of Chinese civilization from the early Shang kingship through the development of the Chinese Empire (221 B.C. - A.D. 1911). We will focus on systematic changes in political, economic, and social structures in China and the intellectual and cultural forms that each configuration produced. Topics include the growth of the Chinese empire, Chinese forms of Buddhism, and the development of Chinese philosophy, scholarship and literature.

    HST 233

    THE RISE OF MODERN CHINA

    Examines the history of Chinese civilization from the 18th century to the present. We will survey the height of the authority of the Qing Imperial government, its dissolution in the 19th century, and the creation of a revolutionary China in the 20th century. Topics include the Opium War and China's foreign relations, the introduction of Westernized technology and education, and the rise of Communism under the leadership of Mao Zedong. Also considers the ways in which our contemporary understanding of China is formed by recent developments in the media - Chinese news and film.

    HST 235

    EUROPEAN EXPANSION: AGE OF DISCOVERY

    A survey of the political, intellectual and scientific roots of the expansion of Europe and of the main voyages of discovery between 1400 and 1825.

    HST 236

    EUROPEAN EXPANSION: AGE OF EMPIRE

    The establishment of European empires in the 19th and 20th centuries, the nature and effect of empires, the reasons for their disappearance and their legacy for Europe and the non-Western world.

    HST 237

    HISTORY OF THE CITY OF ROME

    Topics in the history of urban Rome from antiquity through the modern age.

    HST 239

    WOMEN IN MODERN EUROPE, 1800-PRESENT

    This course will explore the diversity of women's and girls' experiences across Europe as they negotiate between public and private spheres, daily life and great events, Europe and the world. Themes may include industrialization, suffrage, imperialism, "new women," facism, and communism.

    HST 240

    HISTORY OF CHICAGO

    A history of the founding and development of Chicago from a frontier village to a major industrial, commercial and cultural center. This course will focus on the changing lives of ordinary Chicagoans.

    HST 243

    HISTORY OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN THE U.S.

    This course traces the development of the Catholic Church from a missionary enterprise to the position of a major social, political, and economic institution. The course will examine the manner in which the hierarchical institution of the Catholic Church has related to the liberal ideal of American democracy.

    HST 245

    THE HISTORY OF THE BAHAMAS: LOYALSTS, SLAVES & THE CREATION OF AN AFRO-BAHAMIAN WORLD

    History of the Bahamas during the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Focus on the establishment of British rule in the late eighteenth century, the history of slavery in the Bahamas, particularly its expansion after the settlement of Afro-Bahamian society in the nineteenth century. Because the trip will involve time in both Nassau and on San Salvador, the course will compare urban and out island historical and social developments during the Loyalist and post-Loyalist periods

    HST 246

    AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1800

    West African culture, the middle passage, development of the Slave trade, introduction of slavery into the American colonies, African-Americans in the Revolutionary War and the Constitution.

    HST 247

    AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY, 1800-1900

    African-American participation in frontier life, in the growth of the cotton industry, in the Civil War and Reconstruction to Booker T. Washington.

    HST 248

    AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY, 1900 TO PRESENT

    W. E. B. Dubois and Booker T. Washington debates; Marcus Garvey and the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Migration, Civil Rights to Black Power. Cross-listed as ABD 258.

    HST 249

    ORIGINS OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR, 1871-1917

    Examines the development of the European (and Great Power imperial) state system after the unification of Germany; the formation (and global implications) of the pre-war alliance structure; the political and social movements of nationalism, imperialism, and militarism; the naval race; and the July Crisis of 1914.

    HST 250

    ORIGINS OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR, 1914 - 1941

    Examines the European (and world) state system in the aftermath of the First World War and the Russian Revolution; the attempts to forge a new international equilibrium at the Paris Peace Conference and after; the rise of Hitler and Nazism; appeasement; the immediate origins of the Second World War in Europe; and the rise of militarism and advent of war in East Asia.

    HST 251

    ORIGINS OF THE COLD WAR, 1917 - 1953

    Examines the rise of the United States as a world power; the diplomatic significance of the Russian Revolution; the wartime alliance between Great Britain, the United States and the Soviet Union; the collapse of the international order in the aftermath of the Second World War; and the advent of the Cold War.

    HST 253

    HISTORY OF THE MODERN OLYMPICS

    This course will examine the Modern Olympics: the oldest and most inclusive institutionalized effort to engender international exchange and perpetuate peacefulness through athletic excellence. Relying on a mix of primary and secondary sources, the course will touch on an array of important issues, including globalization, race relations, gender issues, the rise of popular culture, and terrorism.

    HST 254

    AMERICAN URBAN HISTORY

    An overview, examining American urban life from the early days of the colonial seaport, through the rise of the smoky industrial center, to today's troubled "dual city" of the rich and the poor. Throughout the course, we will focus on how urbanization affected the lives of the diverse peoples who experienced it. We will also explore the ways in which city life contributed to changes in American culture, and to a greater acceptance of social and cultural diversity.

    HST 258

    WOMEN IN HISTORY

    A comparative study of women's social, cultural, political, economic roles over time in three parts of the world.

    HST 259

    HISTORY OF WESTERN SCIENCE

    A survey of scientific thought and discovery from the ancient Greeks to the early 20th century.

    HST 260

    LESBIAN AND GAY AMERICAN HISTORY, COLONIAL TO 1970

    This course surveys LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer) history in America from the colonial era to the Stonewall Riots. Through primary and secondary source readings and class discussion we will examine how understandings of same-sex sex and sexuality have been constructed in the past. Special attention is paid to readings that draw revealing connections between same-sex sexuality and race, class, and gender.

    HST 263

    JAPAN TO C. 1200

    Follows the formation of a unified state in central Japan during the 5th and 6th centuries. Considers the influence of Korean immigrants and Chinese philosophy and statecraft on the unification of Japan in early antiquity. Explores rise of Japan's aristocratic court culture in Nara and Kyoto as well as powerful Buddhist institutions and the emergence of the warrior class in Eastern Japan. Formerly HST 230.

    HST 264

    JAPAN c.1200 - 1800

    Follows the emergence of the warrior class and the system of dual political authority until the 14th century, with the imperial court in Kyoto and the samurai elite in Kamakura. Continues with an examination of the early modern processes of urbanization and the growth of a monetary economy, changes in social organization, major cultural innovations, and religious/intellectual movements.

    HST 265

    JAPAN, c. 1800-PRESENT

    Follows the radical transformation of Japanese politics, society, and economy with the commercialization of the countryside, the weakening of samurai rule, and increased, often hostile, contact with Western imperialist nations. Explores expansion of Japan as an imperialist nation from the middle of the 19th century and the lasting legacy of that expansion in the region. Explores WWII and postwar political, economic, social changes in contemporary Japan.

    HST 266

    IRELAND, 1450 - 1800, CONQUEST, COLONIZATION & REBELLION

    This course offers a survey of Irish history from the end of the middle ages to the union of Ireland and Great Britain in 1800. It traces the ways in which Ireland was brought under great English (later British) control through processes of agreement, conquest and colonization; and the ways in which various groups within Ireland sought to resist such developments.

    HST 268

    IRELAND, 1800-PRESENT

    Survey of Irish history from 1800 to 2000. Examines the course of Irish history from the Act of Union (creating the United Kingdom), through the struggles and reforms of the 19th century (Catholic Emancipation, the Famine and Irish diaspora, Fenianism, Land Reform and Home Rule), to the creation of the modern nation-state of the 20th century (the Easter Rising, partition and civil war, the role of Eamon deValera, the Republic, and the Troubles). Topics include the contributions of Irish culture and its influence in Europe and the world.

    HST 269

    INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HISTORY

    Presentation of American history for public consumption, particularly museum exhibitions, historic preservation, and archival collections. Good preparation for an internship in history.

    HST 270

    U.S. HISTORICAL LANDSCAPE

    The course considers how the American landscape has been shaped by native occupants, and later, by agricultural settlement and industrial development. A key theme is how culture has shaped the physical world we inhabit, from 1500 to circa 1950.

    HST 272

    FASCISM AND COUNTER REVOLUTION

    An analysis of the various ideological trends that form the mature Fascism from 1920 to the present.

    HST 273

    HISTORY OF SEXUALITY IN EUROPE

    This course will explore key ideas, practices and patterns across multiple European societies from the French Revolution until the present. Key topics may include demographics, identities, sexology, and sexual consumerism.

    HST 274

    INTELLIGENCE IN 20TH CENTURY

    A study of intelligence gathering and analysis in the twentieth century (and beyond). This course will address the role intelligence played in the politics, diplomacy, and strategy of the leading world powers. Special consideration will be given to the eras of the two world wars, the cold war, and the emerging nations in the post-war period. The course is comparative in nature and will examine the intelligence communities of the United States, the European powers, the Soviet Union, Japan, China, and Israel.

    HST 275

    SEX IN AMERICA, PURITANS TO VICTORIANS

    This course surveys the history of three centuries of American ideas about sex and sexuality. By focusing on sexual variation from the era of colonial settlement through the end of the nineteenth century, this course will challenge conventional interpretations of sex in early America.

    HST 276

    SEX IN AMERICA, LATE VICTORIANS TO PRESENT

    This course will provide an overview of the history of American sexuality from the late 19th century through the present. The course will draw from social and cultural history, the history of medicine and psychology, legal and political history, literature, mass media, and gender studies in order to understand the creation of modern sexual identities.

    HST 277

    WAR AND PEACE IN THE MODERN AGE

    A survey of military history from 1648 to the present with emphasis on the relationship between armed forces and the societies that create them, the impact of technology on warfare, and efforts to limit deadly conflict.

    HST 278

    HISTORY OF AMERICAN RELIGION

    A survey of major religious traditions, movements, and themes in American history from the colonial period to the present, including the relationship between religious values and beliefs and other aspects of American culture.

    HST 279

    WESTWARD EXPANSION IN U.S.

    Explores traditional, comparative, and multicultural perspective of successive frontiers in American history. The period covered is approximately 1775 to 1890.

    HST 283

    ASIAN-AMERICAN IMMIGRATION AND HISTORY, 1840-1965

    This course surveys Asian American history from the early nineteenth century to 1965. It explores the changing experiences of Asian immigrants and their citizen descendants in the United States within the larger context of immigration and race relations in American history. The course deals with the following broad themes: causes and processes of migration, responses from American society, and experience of immigration.

    HST 284

    HISTORY OF EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES

    Thematic study of the educational developments in U.S. History

    HST 285

    ANCIENT ROME: AUGUSTUS TO CONSTANTINE

    This course examines the history of the Roman Empire from its beginnings under Augustus (27 BCE-14 CE) to its reorganization under Diocletian (284-305 CE) and Constantine (306-337 CE). Both textual and archaeological sources will be used to understand political, economic, and social developments.

    HST 288

    WOMEN IN UNITED STATES HISTORY

    The history of women's work, family, and political lives in America.

    HST 290

    ANCIENT EGYPT

    This course traces the developments of Egyptian civilization from its earliest beginnings to the Arab/Muslim conquest. Emphasis will be on assessing material culture with students being introduced to techniques of Egyptian archaeology and papyrology.

    HST 291

    THE FERTILE CRESCENT: MESOPOTAMIA AND BEYOND

    Analyzes the early civilizations in the Fertile Crescent through an examination of material culture. Attention will also be given to the archaeology and archaeological methods of the Near East including Jericho and Catalhoyuk.

    HST 292

    HISTORY OF ENGLAND TO 1688

    A survey of cultural, social, economic, and constitutional developments in England from the Norman Conquest to the Glorious Revolution.

    HST 293

    HISTORY OF BRITAIN SINCE 1688

    History of Britain Since 1688. special emphasis on the continued evolution of the constitution, the industrial revolution, imperialism, and Britain's changing role in Europe.

    HST 294

    ANCIENT GREECE

    Traces the development of Greek civilization through an examination of material culture. Emphasis will be on the major monuments and artifacts of the Greek world from prehistory to the Classical Age. Students will also be introduced to techniques and methods of classical archaeology.

    HST 295

    AMERICAN HISTORY ON FILM

    Using film in combination with both primary and secondary historical source material, this course will consider the impact of cinematic myth-making on our understanding of actual historical events.

    HST 296

    ANCIENT ROME: ORIGINS TO THE END OF THE REPUBLIC

    This course traces the development of Rome from a small settlement on the banks of the Tiber in the eighth century BCE to a Mediterranean power in the first century BCE. Both textual and archaeological sources will be used to understand political, economic, and social institutions of the Archaic and Republican periods.

    HST 297

    IMPERIAL SPAIN, 1469-1808

    Analysis of Spain and Spanish empire between 1468-1808. During this period, Spain united and became a leading global power with enormous consequences for Western and world history. Emphasis on the political, economic, socio-cultural history of Iberian society.

    INTC 328

    HISTORY OF RHETORIC AND COMMUNICATION

    Offers an overview of historical foundations of the communication field. Examines how the formulations of rhetoric by various thinkers derived from cultural, religious, and political contexts shape human consciousness and communication patterns. Students read primary and secondary materials on classical rhetoric and rhetoric of diverse cultures. The course promotes an understanding and appreciation of antiquity and development of ideas over time in relation to current cultural and communicative patterns. (Formerly CMNS 328)

    ISP 220

    INTERACTIONS OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

    INTERACTIONS OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

    JOUR 343

    JOURNALISM AND THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE

    This seminar analyzes the current condition of American print, broadcast and online journalism in light of their historic past. Journalism's social responsibilities and its functioning as a business are examined across major periods of American history-the colonial and revolutionary press, the early Republican and penny press, the Civil War press and the press of industrializing America, the rise of the tabloid press, and the role of the press in reporting the development of the United States as a world power during World War II and in its aftermath-will be captured.

    LST 200

    FOUNDING MYTHS AND CULTURAL CONQUEST IN LATIN AMERICA

    This course challenges students to connect the cataclysmic formation of the Latin Americas from the cultures of Europe, Africa, and the Native (indigenous) peoples with the processes that inform our modern world. Colonialism, social stratification and forms of conflict and rebellion all played pivotal roles in the formation of Latin America from origins to the 18th century. The history and culture of the region is presented from many perspectives and across many disciplines.

    LGQ 250

    LGQ FRENCH HISTORY: OLD REGIME TO THE PRESENT

    This course studies male and female same-sex affection in France roughly from the Enlightenment through the early twenty-first century. It examines the representations of homosexuality over more than two centuries taking into account a variety of often contradictory images that have been current in French society, representations that range, among males, from the diabolical criminal of the nineteenth century Romantics to today's trend-setting (and all too domesticated) gay male, and, among females, from elegant salon figures to contemporary feminist militants. Special attention is focused on the history of homosexuality since WWII because the French gay and lesbian community's progress since that time is impressive and particularly rich in its implications for the American civil rights struggle. Additional readings from French writers on homosexual themes compliment most of the readings from the textbooks.

    MCS 342

    HISTORY OF TELEVISION & RADIO

    A history of radio, television, and cable that examines their relations to other media industries including programming, economics, industrial structures, audiences, government and industry policies, and social effects. The course includes viewing, analysis and criticism of significant and representative programming.

    SOC 253

    SLAVERY AND RACIALIZATION

    Addresses both the coming of slavery in Western civilization and how the ideology of race is used to interpret historical events and situations. The course will consider how slavery created the formation of a racist color line.

    SOC 254

    ANCIENT GREECE AND ROME

    The course explores the society and culture of ancient Greece and Rome, including mythology, art, and social institutions. The impact of these cultures on contemporary popular culture and social thought is considered. Emphasis on primary materials.

    SOC 256

    SOCIAL CHANGE

    Examines changes in societies since 1800, including change in technology, culture, and social and political institutions. Topics include modernization, revolution and media. The course emphasizes comparative, global perspectives and use of primary sources.

    CPL 210

    GREAT IDEAS,THE INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIETY I

    Classical Antiquity and the Middle Ages Representative works from the Bible, ancient Greek and Roman literature, and European literature of the Middle Ages. Emphasis on close reading of particular texts in different genres; all readings in English. Authors treated in this sequence may include: Homer, Sappho, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Hippocrates, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Lucretius, Ovid, Seneca, Plutarch, Augustine, Maimonides, Dante. Formerly ISP 210.