Catalog Version

Summer/Autumn 2013
Catalog update:
May 15, 2013

Access archived catalogs in the Catalog Archive section.​​​​​

Students are required to follow the Academic Handbook and Code of Student Responsibility

Course Requirements

The Master of Arts in Journalism requires 12 courses — three core courses, a minimum of six elective courses in Journalism, and a maximum of three outside electives.

Core Courses

Students are required to take all of the following:

Journalism Electives 

Students select a minimum of six courses from the following list:

Outside Electives

With approval from the graduate program director, students can take up to three relevant elective courses from other Communication graduate programs, or relevant graduate elective courses from outside of Communication. Examples of courses students have taken previously are:

Grade Requirements

Students must maintain a 3.0 average in their graduate work to remain in good academic standing. Students who drop below this average will be put on academic probation and will be expected to attain the minimum requirement within two quarters. Failure to do so may result in dismissal from the program.​

JOUR 501

THE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY OF JOURNALISM

This course introduces students to the historic development of social responsibility theory and its continuing role in defining the obligations of journalists in creating an informed citizenry as a critical part of the democratic process. The course analyzes the ongoing tension between journalistic responsibility and the obligations of news organizations to turn profits for their shareholders and the constitutional imprimatur of journalism to offer the information that makes self-governance possible.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 502

NEWS NOW: JOURNALISM IN THE INFORMATION AGE

This course offers historic context in critically examining issues now facing journalism. Students will analyze the impact that convergence and digital technologies are having on ethical decisions that must be made by socially responsible journalists during every news shift. Topics include: who is a "reporter" in the digital age and what are the rights and privileges of the online reporter in a converged environment that influence confidentiality, defamation, privacy, gate-keeping, sensationalism, the public's right to know, globalization, corporatization, and public opinion.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 503

REPORTING FOR CONVERGED NEWSROOMS

This course is designed to equip journalists with the techniques needed in assembling and producing stories that can be published and distributed across integrated media platforms. Students will learn to write and edit reports for online media in ways that add value to stories and encourage readers to drill down into these news narratives for information worth knowing. Students will develop an understanding of how newsgathering practices are evolving through digital media and the role of teamwork in disseminating these stories to an informed citizenry.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 504

BACKPACK REPORTING

This course gives students the practical experience they need in news gathering and distribution within the converged landscape of electronic newsgathering. This will involve the preparation needed in covering stories, writing reports, shooting pictures and videos, and downloading these files along with links to relevant sites online. This course will prepare students to act independently and with others throughout the digital news gathering cycle, including the production of content in multiple information formats.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 505

ADVANCED TELEVISION REPORTING

This course will teach students how to be responsible broadcast news reporters, anchors, producers, and editors, who bring added value to stories in today's converged newsroom environment. Students will learn all aspects of the news gathering and distribution process from story conception to the research, interviewing, reporting, writing, shooting, editing, and producing that goes into a successful, must-see story.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 506

NEWSCAST PRACTICUM

This course teaches students how to construct a newscast, while fulfilling the social responsibility of the press. Students will learn how to utilize digital technologies to craft stories that empower citizens to participate more fully in public life. Students will rotate through different positions weekly---reporter, anchor, editor, technical director, director, floor director, and producer---in producing a weekly public affairs program.
Prerequisites:
JOUR 503 is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 507

VISUAL COMMUNICATION

This course gives students a theoretical and practical grounding in the digital world of photo-journalism. Students will be introduced to the wide array of tools available to reporters in illustrating content from their stories on the web. This includes the hardware and software packages now available in digital story-telling and how citizens use the information in interpreting the news of the day.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 508

NICHE JOURNALISM

The course examines the explosion in magazine and trade publication journalism that is able to target specific audiences with content designed exclusively for them. Students will use the tools now available in reaching reader communities that share common interests and information. This is revolutionizing the ways in which stories are told, while creating communication communities that share common interests and speak a common language.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 509

JOURNALISM LAW AND ETHICS

This course examines the philosophical roots of the First Amendment and how free speech jurisprudence impacts the journalism profession. Students will learn how legal and moral issues arise when newsgathering and free speech conflict with other constitutional and common law rights, and how developments in technology and economics are creating new challenges for journalists and the courts.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 510

SPORTS REPORTING

This course gives students an historic understanding of the role of the sports writer and sports section and the impact the online universe is having on sports writing and reporting. Students will the values of modern sports editors and the techniques used by modern sports writers. Students will learn the perspective and context that makes good sports writing truly exceptional.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 511

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT REPORTING

Arts and Entertainment reporting is among the most widely read, but often is the most poorly executed aspect of a publication or broadcast. Students taking this course will develop a critical appreciation for the role of arts and entertainment reporting in the history of the press and its current role in creating a culture that appreciates and understands the arts and their profound contribution to human understanding.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 512

BUSINESS WRITING AND REPORTING

This course will help students better understand the critical role that business and finance reporting plays in the United States and the world economy. Students will develop the techniques that are necessary in responsibly researching, reporting, writing, and editing business and financial news. Segments of the course will be devoted to the history of the discipline, the ethical responsibilities of the business press, and the unique opportunities now available to the digital reporter of business and financial news.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 513

CHICAGO AND URBAN AFFAIRS REPORTING

This course analyzes what is distinctive about Chicago reporting. Students will be introduced to the rich tradition and history of reporting in this city, and the central role this work has played in the development of urban reporting nationwide. To do this, students will take a close look at the institutions, people, neighborhoods, decision-makers and events that impact Chicago residents in their everyday lives. The emphasis will be on localizing our approach to stories through a beat system that will allow students to regularly report on important areas of municipal life.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 514

OPINION AND COLUMN WRITING

Students will learn what makes for extraordinary opinion and column writing with an emphasis on strong reporting that enables writers to assemble arguments based on the firm foundation of fact. Also examined will be the new ways in which digital delivery systems both empower and threaten the free flow of ideas within and across interest communities.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 515

SPECIAL TOPICS IN JOURNALISM

Topics have included Advanced Reporting; The Chicago Olympics; The Press and The Presidency; Reporting Campaign 2008; and From Franklin to the Internet: A History of American Journalism. Students pursuing the Sports Journalism concentration can use the following courses: Reporting the Olympics, Sports Blogging, and Sports Universe as special topics courses to count towards the concentration.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 517

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING IN JOURNALISM

Students learn advanced reporting techniques while developing projects under the direction of a faculty supervisor. This course is designed to take learning out of the classroom and enables students to develop portfolio pieces while gaining critical real world experiences in reporting. Instructor Permission Required
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 518

WRITING AND REPORTING

This course teaches foundational journalistic skills in writing and reporting for those students coming into the program without significant previous course work or professional experience in journalism.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 519

INTERNATIONAL REPORTING

Digital technologies have created a more interdependent world while radically transforming how that world is reported. This course analyzes the current state of foreign affairs reporting and teaches students how to think critically about foreign news reporting, while giving them the skills needed to execute stories in this challenging environment.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 521

SPORTS PRODUCING

This course will focus on producing sports content for broadcast with an emphasis in television production. Students will learn to write and produce compelling stories through the lens of sports, including coverage of DePaul athletics. The best of this work will be featured on DePaul's broadcast and online outlets as well as university's athletics website. Instructor permission required for this course. Students must have a working knowledge of television production equipment.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 522

MULTI-PLATFORM NEWS EDITING

This course introduces students to editing and publishing procedures, including proofreading, copy editing and headline writing for various publications, including newspapers and online media. Skills are emphasized in AP style, grammar, usage, punctuation, story organization, brevity, basic layout, photo editing, cutline writing, news judgment, ethics and print/online headline writing. In addition to editing basics, students learn industry-standard InDesign software to lay out print news pages.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 523

ONLINE SPORTS REPORTING

Students will report, write, edit and produce online stories about sports issues, features and other topics. Skills are emphasized in game coverage, sports blogging, building a sports community on Twitter, shooting and editing video, recording and editing audio, and building basic web pages in HTML. The course also will explore ethical and legal issues pertaining to video and audio usage rights, athlete branding and other topics in the multimedia sports journalism culture.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 524

WRITING FOR THE DEPAULIA

This course is designed for the serious Journalism student who wants on-deadline experience writing for The DePaulia newspaper and website. Students will cover stories from each section of the paper (news, features, entertainment, opinion and sports) throughout the quarter. Some assignments will come from DePaulia editors, but students are expected to come up with their own ideas. Stories can be as varied as campus news or news in the Lincoln Park and South Loop communities. Supplementing stories with photos and video is expected.

JOUR 525

URBAN AFFAIRS REPORTING

There are stories hidden in plain sight throughout the city, and this course will cover how to find and cover those stories from the ground up. Urban Affairs Reporting will focus on the stories that happen beyond City Hall, in neighborhoods and communities, among individuals and groups - stories that influence and are influenced by government, business, and other powerful institutions. The course will help students improve their ability to develop sources, find story ideas, and thereby cover critical urban issues with greater depth, originality, and excitement. Students will learn how to report these often fascinating stories across a variety of print and online platforms.

JOUR 526

POLITICAL COMMUNICATION

This course examines how political communication and related media affect public opinion, civic life, elections, and public policy, and the impact of these communication dynamics on civic institutions and democratic decision-making. Students will study how journalists, elected officials, citizens, and political strategists construct, use, and understand political messages, including how news, advertising, and entertainment media contribute to the shaping of political perceptions, emotions, and behaviors in a variety of circumstances domestically and internationally.

JOUR 527

LIFESTYLE REPORTING

This course will give students the tools to write Lifestyle stories and to think creatively. Assignments will include human-interest stories, health, fitness, design, fashion, food, leisure and social issues. The class will concentrate on the tools reporters need to create this kind of work, from good quotes to relevant sourcing.

JOUR 528

REPORTING FOR GOOD DAY DEPAUL

This course will give students extensive experience doing on-air reporting for the DePaul student television news program, "Good Day DePaul." Reporters will cover breaking news stories, features, and serious enterprise stories. Students must have experience shooting in the field and editing in Final Cut Pro, either through previous television news courses at DePaul, or from other work.
Prerequisites:
JOUR 505 or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 529

ONLINE NEWS BUREAU

This course offers first-hand experience on a digital newsroom. Students should already have a grasp of basic online journalism skills through earlier classes or practical experience. The emphasis of the course is on producing high-quality stories both in terms of content and in terms of presentation. Throughout the quarter, students will work as multimedia producers, editors and reporters to create content for thewiredloop.info, a platform for news experimentation.
Prerequisites:
JOUR 503 or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this course.

JOUR 532

THE PRESS AND THE PRESIDENCY

This course analyzes the historic competition between candidates, the media, and presidential campaigns. It examines how public understanding of political issues, public policy, and the candidates is created. We'll drill down into conditions that lead to a cooperative or adversarial press in campaign reporting and how the public perceives the political process and the role of the press in forming public opinion in presidential campaigns and during presidencies.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 534

TOPICS IN PHOTOJOURNALISM

This course is a practicum designed to prepare visual journalists for the skills they'll need in a rapidly changing profession. Students will learn about the strategic use of photographs in digital storytelling, including the role of photographs in multimedia production. Students will also understand the ethical obligations faced by today's photojournalist.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 590

JOURNALISM WORKSHOP

This course allows students to sample a range of hands on, practical offerings in journalism that can enhance their knowledge and expertise. Workshop topics can include video camera basics, non-linear editing with Final Cut Pro and news page layout and design. PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS IS A 2-CREDIT COURSE. Students can take this course a maximum of two times for a total of 4 credits.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 592

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Students will be guided in the development of a special project that furthers their collaboration with an instructor and produces a report that demonstrates their mastery of critical content and competencies. The independent study option is intended for students who have demonstrated a mastery of course content, who would benefit from a sustained, focused collaboration with a relevant faculty member.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

CMN 591

INTERNSHIP

This graduate level course is designed to integrate the student's work experience at the internship site with a career-management curriculum that enhances internship success and increases employability.

CMNS 545

COMMUNICATION AND TECHNOLOGY

Communication and Technology explores the process through which technological and social systems co-create or invent each other. As such, this course not only examines the role that new communication technologies play in shaping our social systems and the organizations within them, but also looks at how social, cultural, economic and legal contexts influence the development and emergence of these technologies.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Communication student is a prerequisite for this class.

CMNS 552

STRATEGIC COMMUNICATION

This course explores the process by which communicators attempt to accomplish their goals. In particular, this course covers theories of persuasion, strategic message design (creating messages that take into account multiple audiences and goals), and how the inferential process influences decision-making.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Communication student is a prerequisite for this class.

CMNS 561

INTERNATIONAL MEDIA

Examines the political economy of the global media, with attention to institutional, historical, and contemporary questions of ownership and program content, as well as representations by the U.S. commercial news media of the foreign other and the representation of Western culture and institutional life in non-Western contexts. Includes examination of issues in the mass media now debated within the international community, pursuing questions about the New World Information Order, the international marketplace of images, cultural imperialism and national culture, and types of programming aimed at an international audience.

CMNS 563

MULTICULTURAL MEDIA REPRESENTATIONS

This course examines both representational practices and theories that are informed by multicultural perspectives. It explores ways in which scholars and media practitioners have dealt with the epistemological problem of "difference" The course may take up topics such as race, class, age, and sexual orientation as categories of difference that have informed and continue to inform academic inquiries. The course also looks at historical and/or contemporary media texts, and analyzes them through these methods.

DC 415

POST-PRODUCTION SOUND DESIGN

This course expands on topics covered in DC 215. Emphasis will be on mixing and editing techniques for music and sound effects. Coursework also includes the recording of natural sounds and special effects to reinforce images and the story. The course is intended for advanced students who wish to develop their skills and gain more experience in preparing and mixing sound tracks for traditional as well as interactive narratives. PREREQUISITE(S): DC 215
Prerequisites:
CDM graduate students in the Preqrequisite Phase are restricted from registering for this class.

DC 420

EDITING

Emphasis is on developing the student's understanding of the art of cinematic storytelling and montage. Work on more advanced projects is integrated into the class as a means of mastering advanced editing tools and techniques. PREREQUISITE(S): DC 220 or DC 460 or DC 409
Prerequisites:
CDM graduate students in the Preqrequisite Phase are restricted from registering for this class.

DC 430

VISUAL EFFECTS

Exploration of the expanding field of visual effects. Students explore contemporary concepts and approaches to production in the current stage of film and video effects work. Digital and traditional methodologies will be covered, with a concentration on digital exercises illustrating modern techniques.
Prerequisites:
CDM graduate students in the Preqrequisite Phase are restricted from registering for this class.

DC 471

DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION

This course covers all phases of documentary filmmaking including interview techniques, storytelling with interviews and B roll, and documentary cinematography. For the final project each student will produce a completed documentary film. PREREQUISITE(S): (DC 210 and DC 220) or DC 460 or DC 409

MCS 530

NEW MEDIA AND CULTURE

This seminar considers the cultural ramifications of new media in shaping life experience and opportunity. As interactive digital media technologies expand opportunities for social networking, text and instant messaging, file sharing, collaborative authoring, blogging, podcasting and mobile communication, this seminar asks how these new technologies impact identity formation, creative participation and concepts of public culture. Issues of concern include race, gender, class, sexuality, cultural citizenship, fandom, subcultures and democratic participation.

MCS 534

DOCUMENTARY STUDIES

This course examines the rise and growth of documentary forms, including audio, film, television, photography, and literary journalism. Students will study representative works from each documentary approach and learn to analyze the techniques of observation and representation at use in these pieces. Students will become familiar with the social, aesthetic, and historical discourses of documentary and understand major theoretical and critical approaches of analyzing documentary forms. Students will become aware of the convergent and divergent qualities that are features of qualitative research, journalism, and documentary practice. Students will learn how documentary functions as a witness to personal and public histories.

MCS 541

AUDIO DOCUMENTARY

This course uses hands-on projects so that students can explore the steps in the process of creating an audio documentary. Through practical application students consider questions that surround the interpretation of cultural experience. Additionally, students analyze a variety of approaches to audio documentary in an effort to understand better this significant form of storytelling.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Media and Cinema Studies student is a prerequisite for this class.

NMS 502

NEW MEDIA, OLD MEDIA

New Media, Old Media offers a critical examination of the rise of the information age and its impact on old media. This course will situate the NMS program in the historical/critical development of mass media and its relationship to power and meaning-making.

NMS 520

WEB DESIGN I

An introduction to the process of making functional sites for display on the Internet. Students will learn HTML-based development software, and work with imaging software to apply fundamental theories of new media design to the production of working computer-screen applications.

NMS 521

WEB DESIGN II

An introduction to digital authoring software, such as Macromedia Flash, that allows for the combination of animation, sound, and complex user interaction. Students will design and produce working animations while exploring the balance between purpose, usability, and aesthetic appeal.

PRAD 535

PUBLIC RELATIONS IN HEALTH CARE

This course will help students understand the organizational impact of health policy in America and prepare students to assume roles in communication management positions in the United States health care industry. Students will explore current issues in health policy such as the problem of the uninsured, the rising cost of health care, and the politics of health. Each student will be responsible for focusing on a particular aspect of health policy and developing a report on the topic.

PRAD 562

MEDIA RELATIONS

Explores the communication between reporters and organizational spokespeople. Topics include goals of reporters and spokespeople during the transmission of information, interpretation of the various types of corporate media for reporters, techniques for corporate spokespeople for giving effective interviews. Case studies will be analyzed.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Public Relations and Advertising student is a prerequisite for this class.

PRAD 575

COMMUNICATION LAW AND ETHICS

This course covers the aspects of communication law and ethics relevant to communication professionals. Legal topics include First Amendment concepts, libel, privacy, copyright, freedom of information, and regulation of advertising. The ethical component focuses on the professional responsibilities of practitioners in communication fields with special emphasis on public relations and advertising.
Prerequisites:
(Graduate Public Relations and Advertising student and PRAD 553 and PRAD 555) or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

JOUR 533

PUBLIC RECORDS REPORTING

This course helps students understand the complex issues raised by news coverage of the American legal system with a focus on reporting intelligently and responsibly about the events and issues that arise on the crime and courthouse beats. Students will learn how to interpret court documents, how to identify and cultivate sources on these beats, and ways to find and report the news from events in the legal process. By focusing learning on this specific government branch and sharpening skills on acquiring and deciphering public records, the course will better equip students to fulfill the watchdog role of the press.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

CMN 592

GRADUATE INTERNSHIP II

This graduate level course is designed to integrate the student's work experience at the internship site with a self-reflection based curriculum that enhances internship success and increases employability.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Communications student is a prerequisite for this class