Course Requirements

​Students will achieve the successful completion of a minimum of 76 quarter hours of graduate credit beyond the bachelor's degree and will complete a traditional Master's Thesis and a Doctoral Dissertation.

Core Courses

Statistics and Methodology

Other Psychology and Interdisciplinary Courses

Other Program Requirements

Although an applicant is accepted into the M.A./Ph.D. community program, formal acceptance and admission to doctoral candidacy depends upon the student's satisfactory progress in meeting the various demands of graduate education and professional training.

Field Work and Practicum

All students develop an applied community-based fieldwork project. They develop relationships with community organizations, design a project based on mutual interests, and receive individual and group supervision to implement the project they design. Metropolitan Chicago has a large population of community sites to draw upon as resources for assisting in placing students in practica and job-related sites.

Master's Thesis

It is expected that the student's proposal for the Master's Thesis will be approved by November 15th of the second year in the program. The student's final Thesis is due by February 1st of third year in program.

Doctoral Comprehensive Exams or Project

The student is expected to take doctoral comprehensive examinations in the area of community psychology in the Spring of the 3rd year in the program. These examinations cannot be taken until the student has completed the master's thesis.  Another option is to conduct a comprehensive project rather than take an exam. The project involves the submission of an empirical paper, review paper, or grant application. The project proposal is due by May 1st of 3rd year (or within 3 months of completing thesis). The final comprehensive project is due by May 1st of the fourth year (or within 1 year of proposal acceptance).

Dissertation

The student should form a dissertation committee and begin work on the dissertation proposal during the third or fourth year. The dissertation proposal should be accepted by November 15th of the 5th year. The final dissertation defense should be complete by May 1st of the 6th year in program.

Oral Examination

Student is to defend his or her dissertation and to show competence in the general field of psychology and in the area of specialization.

Time Limitation

  1. Between admission to the doctoral program and admission to doctoral candidacy: not more than four years
  2. Between admission to candidacy and the final examination: not less than eight months and not more than five years.

PSY 492

PRINCIPLES OF CONSULTATION

The principles and dynamics involved in the various types of consultative relationships. Techniques of consultation with parents, teachers, agencies, physicians and others in regard to problems and deviancy, methods of management and treatment.

PSY 493

ADVANCED COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY

An advanced introduction to community psychology with an emphasis on major historical and contemporary themes such as prevention of psychological problems and promotion of wellness, empowerment and social justice, community research methods, diversity in gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation and disability status, community processes, and collaboration and intervention to address social problems.

PSY 495

GRANT WRITING IN PSYCHOLOGY

This course will facilitate students' ability to transpose psychology principles and theory into practice by preparing them to be psychology entrepreneurs via the grant writing process. Class members will become familiar with public and private funding sources, searching for appropriate funding sources, and reviewing a proposal. Class members will create a grant proposal that can be submitted to a funding organization.

PSY 511

HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY

A survey of the psychological factors involved in health and illness. Also explores the psychological issues in prevention of illness, and psychological considerations in treatment. Cross-listed as MPH 511.

PSY 567

SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY

Explores topics of current interest in the area of Community Psychology and related fields for advanced graduate students, with emphases on theory, research and intervention.

PSY 520

PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN DIVERSITY

Considerations related to minority status and issues specific to diagnostics and interventions with minority populations.

PSY 568

SEMINAR IN COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY

Analysis of theories of community and human behaviors from the standpoint of general systems principles.

PSY 569

SEMINAR IN PROGRAM EVALUATION

Analysis of major research programs dealing with social and mental health problems with emphasis on epidemiological and socio-clinical research methods. Four quarter hours.

PSY 585

FIELDWORK IN COMMUNITY SETTINGS

An applied experience which integrates skills of consultation, program development, advocacy, and program evaluation.

PSY 593

PRE-DOCTORAL RESEARCH

Graduate students in specific doctoral programs are required to register for this course for at least three quarters prior to registering for Psy 598 (Dissertation Seminar) or Psy 599 (Dissertation Research). This course requires full-time (at least 8-12 hours per week) work on research under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Zero-credit hours.

PSY 654

COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY

Focus on systemic and ecological theories of human behavior, diversity, social support, community intervention and evaluation, empowerment, social change, and working with underserved populations. Community service project required. Cross-level with PSY 354.

PSY 410

ADVANCED STATISTICS I

Graphical methods for data display, analysis of variance, multiple comparisons, multifactor analysis of variance, randomized block, repeated measures, and related designs. Cross-listed as SOC 450.

PSY 411

ADVANCED STATISTICS II

Multiple linear regression, analysis of covariance, and logistic regression.
Prerequisites:
PSY 410 is a prerequisite for this class.

PSY 420

ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Design and analysis of basic and applied psychological research with an emphasis on statistical software.
Prerequisites:
PSY 411 is a prerequisite for this class.

PSY 416

METHODS IN QUALITATIVE RESEARCH

Principles and techniques of research design in behavioral, social and clinical research; questionnaires, interview schedules, rating scales involving multivariable analysis. Application of parametric and nonparametric tests. Application of research findings to professional practice.

PSY 418

MULTIVARIATE STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

Multivariate regression, principal component, cluster analysis and multidemensional scaling. Canonical correlation, multivariate analysis of variance, linear discriminant function analysis.
Prerequisites:
PSY 411 is a prerequisite for this class.

PSY 419

FACTOR ANALYSIS AND PATH MODELING

Theoretical foundations, methods of analysis, and comparison of various factor analytic models. Structural equation and measurement models using the Mplus/ LISREL program.

PSY 558

SEMINAR IN ADVANCED STATISTICS

Prerequisites:
PSY 411 and PSY 420 are a prerequisite for this class.

PSY 597

MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH

Original investigation of a specific research problem. Four hours required.

PSY 599

DISSERTATION RESEARCH

Four hours total required. One to four hours per quarter.

PSY 550

SEMINAR IN TEACHING PSYCHOLOGY

This course exposes students to major pedagogical and classroom management considerations in higher education and familiarizes students with instructional support services across the university. This year-long, cohort-based course is required for graduate students prior to becoming instructors in the department. It begins each Winter Quarter and ends Autumn Quarter. Students who enroll should expect to complete all requirements for the master's degree prior to Autumn Quarter. Zero-credit hours.

PSY 430

ADVANCED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

Advanced study of social psychological methodology, ethics and deception, attitudes, altruism, aggression, and interpersonal processes and attraction.

PSY 561

ADVANCED PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN AND GENDER

A review of research and theory on women, including sexist biases in traditional research, feminist methodology, pedagogy and therapy, violence against women, gender differences in development, relationships, sexuality, and the interplay of gender, race and sexual orientation. Cross-listed with MLS 478 and WGS 470.