Course Requirements

Core Curriculum Courses: 32 quarter hours (8 courses) required, grade of C or better required

Electives: 8 quarter hours (2 courses) required, grade of C or better required
2 Master’s-level courses, chosen from any of the following COE programs (in consultation with CS faculty advisor)

  • Curriculum Studies (CS)
  • Administration and Supervision (A&S)
  • Social and Cultural Studies Graduate (SCG)
  • Bilingual and Bicultural Education (BBE)
  • Teaching and Learning (T&L)
  • Literacy and Specialized Instruction (LSI)
  • Elementary or Early Childhood Education (T&L)

Social and Cultural Studies Courses: 8 quarter hours (2 courses) required, grade of C or better required

Master of Education (M.Ed.) Degree Requirements:  4 quarter hours, grade of C or better required

Review of Literature and Integrative Paper completed in conjunction with faculty advisement 

CS 482

THE HISTORY OF CURRICULUM PRACTICE

A survey of trends and movements in curriculum practice. Particular emphasis will be placed on the recurrent nature of curriculum practices and the reasons for this. The class will consider underlying models of curriculum practice in their historical settings as possible methods for meeting contemporary social needs as well as the assets and liabilities of these models.

CS 485

CURRICULUM/PROGRAM EVALUATION

Evaluation is essential for curriculum/program development and implementation. Hence, understanding evaluation methods, technologies, and quality criteria is particularly relevant to educational leaders, curriculum/program designers, and technology specialists. In this course, students will critically examine a variety of current evaluation models, instruments, and resources. Students will also conduct a comprehensive analysis of a significant evaluation study relevant to their specific professional interest. Registration is restricted to students in Advanced Master's programs.
Prerequisites:
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 591

CURRICULUM THEORIZING: MULTIPLE LENSES

This course examines diverse curriculum discourses, historical as well as contemporary, within a broader context of issues related to education and schooling. It is designed to engage students critically in the study of curricular frameworks, their assumptions, values, and implications for education, schooling, teaching and learning. Major topics include frameworks for defining and conceptualizing curriculum and curricular visions; social, political, and historical contexts of curriculum construction; issues of gender, race, class, and the media; and the curriculum as socialy constructed and historically contextualized discourse(s) about what is and what should be taught. Particular content areas will be used as examples.

CS 488

CURRICULUM DESIGN

Provides a project-based opportunity to develop curriculum that promotes student understanding, student voice, and student involvement in school or community change. Encourages educators to think carefully about what does and should constitute the curriculum and why, who and what is served and who/what is marginalized by current curriculum arrangements, and how collaboration in curriculum design can assist in organizing classrooms, schools, and communities.

CS 489

CREATIVITY AND CRITICAL THINKING - VYGOTSKY, BAKHTIN, MAKIGUCHI, IKEDA

Introduces students to the educational philosophies of Russian thinkers Lev Vygotsky (1896 - 1934) and Mikhail Bakhtin (1895 - 1975) and Japanese thinkers Tsunesaburo Makiguchi (1871 - 1944) and Daisaku Ikeda (1928 - ). Students will locate confluences in these thinkers' philosophies and apply them to current curriculum or curriculum theorizing in their chosen discipline(s) (e.g., mathematics, social studies, language education, etc.), context(s) (e.g., policy, gender, socioeconomics, identity, etc.) and K-12/adult level(s). Topics covered include, among others, cultural-historical theory, socially constructed meaning making, zone of proximal development, dialogism, carnival, value and value-creating pedagogy, humanitarian competition, and human revolution.

SCG 610

INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS

(Special section of SCG 410, Introduction to Research: Purposes, Issues and Methodologies.) This course will examine the basic questions, issues and theoretical frameworks central to the purpose, conceptualization, conduct, writing, reading and the use of educational research as a means for informing educational theory, practice and policy. Students will be exposed to the multiple frameworks which inform educational research, the various methodoogies employed in collecting and analyzing data and will examine the advantages, limitations and values implict in conducting and evaluating research. Students will also begin exploring possible thesis topics as they begin defining their particular research purpose, methodology and issues.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Social & Cultural Foundations in Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 410

INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH: PURPOSES, ISSUES, AND METHODOLOGIES

(formerly CUG 400) This course will examine the basic questions, issues and theoretical frameworks central to the purpose, conceptualization, conduct, writing, reading and the use of educational research as a means for informing educational theory, practice and policy. Students will be exposed to the multiple frameworks which inform education research, the various methodologies employed in collecting and analyzing data and will examine the advantages, limitations and values implicit in conducting and evaluating research.

SCG 401

ADVANCED DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Current research and theories in human development relating to motivation, personality, learning and socialization. Case studies and an analysis of various developmental problems.

SCG 402

PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING

Study of the learning-teaching process with specific emphasis on the person as a learner, human capacity and potential, learning theories and materials, motivation, concept formation, and behavior.

SCG 403

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING: ELEMENTARY

This course will focus on the developmental processes of school-age children, kindergarten through middle school, by beginning with the study of the young child's social, emotional, cognitive, and physical growth and change. The theoretical and observational study of child development will be framed by an examination of culture, gender, and socio-economic factors as they inform assumptions about normative processes. The relationship between development and learning in a social context will be examined with particular attention to children's developing concepts in math, science, and language arts. Attention will also be given to the role of teachers and schools and other institutions in fostering the healthy development and learning of young people.

SCG 604

PROSEMINAR: IDENTITY CONSTRUCTIONS AND NEGOTIATIONS

This course examines identity construction in educational contexts. Drawing on theoretical frameworks in the sociology of education, postmodernist, feminist and critical theories of education, and cultural studies literature, this course will explore identity as complex and multifaceted. It explores relations of class, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality and the implications of sociality for contemporary education.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Social & Cultural Foundations in Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 406

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING:SECONDARY

This course focuses on the multiple factors that contribute to the period of adolescence, bridging childhood and adulthood. Particular attention is given to the intrapsychic, interpersonal, biological, and socio-cultural processes that are mediated by the meanings that youth give to their identity vis a vis rac, class, and gender formations within the broader society. Students will engage in interdisciplinary study of theories to examine the implications for teaching and learning processes and the role of educational institutions in fostering the healthy development of youth in society. Forms of inquiry will include students' examination of their own lives and assumptions, critique of theory, and observations of young people in a variety of contexts.

SCG 439

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY OF YOUTH AND MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION

This course examines foundational and contemporary theories of youth and adolescent development. It considers how these theoretical ideas relate to contemporary questions of youth and middle level education. The course explores the historical invention of adolescence, changing ideas about the meaning of childhood, as well as some of the broader social, economic, political, and cultural implications of these changing ideas. This course seeks to develop in prospective educators a broader capacity to theorize about youth and schooling, and, hence, to act critically and reflectively in multiple contexts in which youth learn.

SCG 608

PROSEMINAR: IDEOLOGY, POWER AND POLITICS

This course examines how power operates pedagogically and how domination and resistance get shaped in education. It considers power relations in society and how these power relations enter into educational discourse and practice. It also explores ways in which power produces various educational practices and ways in which power gets psychically configured. Students will examine major theories of power, analyze race, ethnicity, gender, class and sexuality as systems of power and consider the educational implications of such an analysis.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Social & Cultural Foundations in Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 408

EDUCATION AND SOCIETY

A study of social forces that impinge upon the educational enterprise and analysis of the relationship to major social problems in urban education with emphasis on their social, economic, political, historical and philosophical dimensions.

SCG 603

PROSEMINAR: CULTURE AND EDUCATION

This course focuses on the relationship between education, pedagogy, and theories of culture framed by a concern for social justice. Topics may include the pedagogical and political dimensions of popular culture, questions of knowledge production, the relationship between knowledge and power of the political economy of culture production.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Social & Cultural Foundations in Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 409

SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION

This course focuses on the relationship between school structures and culture, social relations of race, ethnicity, class, and gender, and ideologies organizing education in the United States. Students will explore a range of theories in the sociology of education atha5t explore linkages between school structures and processes and broader social forces. Readings may examine the political economy of schooling, inequalities in educational practices, and student and teacher identities shaped by schools and the larger society.

SCG 611

PROSEMINAR: PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES IN EDUCATION, CULTURE AND ETHICS

Examines both traditional philosophical questions in education from such perspectives as Africana, feminist, Latino/Hispanic thought and distinctively Africana, feminist, and Latino/Hispanic issues in a philosophical way. Some of the perspectives are, for example, the necessary conditions of a humanistic education, the relation between theory and practice, the relationship between individual and institutional/society, the role of education in the struggle for social justice, the role of aesthetics in human development and projects of political emancipation, the dialectics of history and experience in the development of liberatory ideas, and the moral and ethical dimensions of education.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Social & Cultural Foundations in Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 411

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION

This course examines the relationship of education to the moral and ethical dilemmas or predicaments of the human condition. It will entail issues related to the nature of education's responsiveness, or lack there of, to the concerns of the human condition: for example, human alienation, suffering, success and failure, caring, freedom, responsibility, liberaiton and agency. Special attention will be given to how these concerns influences or have social, cultural and political implications for how teachers address them within the teaching and learning process.

A&S 498

INSTRUCTIONAL SUPERVISION AND SUPPORT

Instructional Supervision is examined from the perspective of both student and teacher learning, dealing with issues such as motivation, responsibility and increased proficiency. This course deals with issues of teacher observation and evaluation; clinical supervision; and professional development programming.
Prerequisites:
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 590

ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

A development approach used in combining theory, research, and applications for improving interpersonal effectiveness and to develop problem-solving capacity of the organization. The course is about change theory, people in organizations and the achievement of individual and organizational goals.
Prerequisites:
Status as a student in a College of Education Advanced Master's program is a prerequisite for this class.

CSC 580

DESIGN OF OBJECT-ORIENTED LANGUAGES (Formerly SE 580)

This course covers issues in the design and specification of object-oriented programming languages. Sample topics include the use of patterns in program representation, static and dynamic semantics, subject reduction, subtyping, inheritance, polymorphism, genericity and concurrency. PREREQUISITE(S): SE 450.
Prerequisites:
CDM graduate students in the Preqrequisite Phase are restricted from registering for this class.

CS 606

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

Review of Literature. This paper will give students the opportunity to develop and demonstrate written competence in a subfield of their disciplines and to enhance life-long learning. Specifically, they will broaden their knowledge base and inform themselves about a topic, issue, theory, etc., reviewing and synthesizing existing literature. To do so, students will need a variety of bibliographic skills including searchig data bases. (See the student handbook for additional information about completing Master's papers.)

CS 607

INTEGRATIVE PAPER

Integrative Paper. Non-credit. Students will observe and/or participate in the reciprocal interaction of theory and practice, by investigating actual practice in the field as it relates to theory. This might take the form of investigating how a particular theory is applied in the field, developing a practical application of a theory, or, conversely, developing/refining a theory based on investigations made in the field. (See the student handbook for additional information about completing Master's papers.)

CS 580

RESEARCH SEMINAR IN CURRICULUM STUDIES

This course is designed to help graduate students in Curriculum Studies through the difficult process of planning, organizing, drafting, and revising their Master's papers. Students will be expected to complete a literature review and to develop a strong proposal for an integrative paper as a prelude to selecting an advisor for their Master's papers. For M.Ed. students only.
Prerequisites:
SCG 410, 6 additional graduate courses and status as an Advanced Masters student is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 470

TEACHERS AS LEADERS

Assists teachers in becoming leaders for positive change in schools and districts. Provides overview of major theoretical models in research on teaching and teacher leadership, historical perspectives on the teaching profession, and overview of select best practice in teacher collaboration, mentoring and coaching. Specific topics addressed may include: developing leadership among existing teaching staff; fostering professional collaboration; improving instruction school-wide; organizing colleagues, administrators, parents and students to improve achievement; fostering sustainability in teaching/fighting teacher attrition; teaching standards; team teaching; and curriculum mapping.

CS 472

ETHICS, CURRICULUM AND SOCIAL CHANGE

Explores some major issues impacting curriculum, including cultural and socioeconomic factors, legal issues, conflicting values, pressures for assessment, and the push to include technology. Examines the historical development and current state of education in the U.S. as compared to education in other cultures. Emphasis on ways that educators can work as change agents within the competing demands of these forces.

CS 473

ASSESSMENT

Explores current theory and practice regarding alternate forms of assessment, including formal, standardized, and informal tests and inventories; selection, evaluation, and interpretation of tests used in educational settings; portfolio assessment, video performances, and presentations; preparation and use of teacher-made tests; evaluating outcomes; and utilizing data to improve instruction. The critical examination of multiple perspectives of assessment theories, policies and practices center around the emphasis on developing strategies to evaluate student progress.

CS 481

THE STUDY OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING

A selective survey and analysis of research on teachers and teaching. Particular emphasis will be placed on the assumptions which are built into various forms of research and the effect these assumptions have on how results should be interpreted and used in supervision and curriculum development. Each student will be expected to become familiar with alternative ways of studying teachers and the teaching process in his/her area of expertise. While many school settings will be utilized because of the many studies done in this area, research in non-school settings will be given a good deal of emphasis.

CS 492

CREATING AND SUSTAINING PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES

This course will provide the framework for the creation, development and sustainability of a professional learning community. Professional learning communities have at their core three guiding principles: 1) a focus on learning, 2) the creation of a collaborative culture and 3) a results-orientation. Within the professional learning community, members are committed to working collaboratively in an ongoing process of collective inquiry and action research in order to achieve better results for the students and community they serve. Professional Learning Communities operate under the assumption that the key to improved learning for students is continuous, job-embedded learning for educators.

Academic Standards

Students must maintain a 3.0 average or higher to continue in the program.  Any grade below a C will not count for credit toward completion of the program.