Course Requirements 

Core Courses: 24 quarter hours required

Research Courses: 20 quarter hours required

The research courses are sequenced and must be taken in the following order:

Elective Requirement  (4 quarter hours required)

Concentration Courses: 20 quarter hours required

Candidacy Course:  non-credit, non-tuition

Dissertation Courses: 8 quarter hours required

Superintendent Internship* : 4 quarter hours required

 *Students interested in the Superintendent Endorsement must complete the Superintendent Internship. This course is completed in addition to the required 76-credit hours for the Ed.D. degree.

A&S 801

LEADERSHIP: THEORY AND PRACTICE

This course examines leadership theories from various social, psychological and philosophical perspectives both historical and contemporary. The student will also be called upon to reflect upon contemporary practice in K -16 educational leadership settings and evaluate the efficacy of the theoretical frameworks in light of practice.
Prerequisites:
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 811

ASSESSMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY

This course addresses the key role of leaders in educational systems for the development, articulation, implementation, and supervision of an assessment process that provides accountability for all stakeholders-students, parents, teachers, legislators, relevant communities, and governing authorities. Issues of philosophy, standards, outcomes, curricula, instrumentation, technology, and the interconnected nature of these factors are identified as they influence the leadership role in accountability compliance. Factors related to ethical practice and social justice anchor the philosophical and political parameters of the course.
Prerequisites:
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 704

CURRICULUM DISCOURSES/PERSPECTIVES OVER TIME

This course focuses on the examination of the ways in which curriculum as a field has developed over time: attention to changes in terms of how it has been defined, conceptualized; theoretical and philosophical issues; assumptions and values; as well as implications for teaching and learning. These topics will be addressed within different historical and social contexts. Readings will include primary texts by major theorists as well as secondary material including commentary and critique. A primary goal of the course is to provide students with an overview of major movements in curriculum history as a foundation for further study. This course will serve as a prerequisite for all other curriculum courses in the doctoral program.
Prerequisites:
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 751

CURRICULUM FOR HUMAN AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

This course provides students with a framework for thinking about how education in general and curriculum and instruction in particular can and cannot facilitate both human development (that is, healthy growth, learning, and maturation of individuals) and community development (that is, the creation or maintenance of healthy, safe, and vibrant, literate, politically enfranchised neighborhoods). This course explores contemporary theories and models of curriculum reform, school improvement, and youth and community development, notably: asset-based community development, participatory action research (PAR), full-service community schools, and university-assisted community schools. Additional topics explored may include: What kinds of schools, curricula, and teaching we need to best prepare all students (especially those least served by existing schools) for meaningful participation in an increasingly interconnected world; the explicit and implicit goals of current school reform efforts and how these are reshaping civic and democratic goals of schools; how universities, schools, and communities can collaborate to push school improvement and community development; and the benefits and liabilities of hybrid school improvement/community development projects (e.g., the Harlem Children?s Zone).
Prerequisites:
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 701

PHILOSOPHY OF ETHICS IN EDUCATION

This course is a philosophical investigation into the structure and meaning of ethics within education. Education, a condition for self-formation and self-other relations, is explored as a site of ethical inquiry. It is within this framework that education, which involves learning, teaching, response, and communication, is posed as a condition of ethical possibility and not merely as the vehicle through which a certain ethics gets carried out. Primary and secondary philosophical and non-philosophical literature and authors within and outside of philosophy of education will be used to study these issues.
Prerequisites:
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 711

CULTURE, POWER AND EDUCATION

The purpose of this course is to facilitate the development of a critical understanding of the larger concept of culture within the notion of multiculturalism. This begins by recognizing that educational institutions such as schools and universities are cultural institutions engaged in the making of culture. While the focus of multiculturalism is about theorizing difference in relation to the particular cultural processes that go on in schools and universities, its focus does not address how educational institutions are shaped by broader cultural dynamics that are outside of the immediate context of educational institutions. It is in this context that doctoral students will examine how cultural processes are intimately connected with social relations, especially with class relations, with gender and ethnic divisions, and with the racial restructuring of social relations. They will also explore how culture involves power, which serves to produce inequalities in the abilities of individuals and social groups to define and realize their needs. In addition, culture will be analyzed as a site of social difference and struggle. The primary focus of the course will be to explore how the larger political economy, popular culture and politics of a society effect the dynamics of how culture is constructed within social life. Doctoral students from within this framework will analyze what we mean by culture; how it is produced and consumed; the relationship of everyday life are represented by dominant cultural and sub-cultural groups and institutions. It is in this context that the course also examines how relations of power, knowledge, social identity and pedagogy within educational institutions are conditioned and shaped by the educational practice that shapes and impinges upon the internal workings and purposes of educational institutions.
Prerequisites:
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 775

SEMINAR: FRAMEWORKS OF INQUIRY IN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH I

This course offers doctoral students a general introduction to theory and practice in educational research. First, it is designed to help students develop an understanding of the assumptions that underlie multiple approaches to knowledge construction and the conduct of inquiry in education. Second, the course will introduce students to the structural organization of a research manuscript. By the end of the course students should be able to: understand key theoretical and methodological issues in educational inquiry; engage in the critical analysis of multiple educational frameworks; recognize the components of a research manuscript; and identify a general topic area for dissertation research.
Prerequisites:
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 785

SEMINAR: FRAMEWORKS OF INQUIRY IN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH II

Drawing upon the knowledge and skills developed in Frameworks of Inquiry I, this course is designed to enhance students' ability to critically analyze existing research as a crucial element in completing their own doctoral research. Emphasis will be placed on the preparation of a critical literature review. By the end of the course students should be able to: review the components of a research proposal; develop further the ability to evaluate research critically; conduct a literature review that will involve interpretation, evaluation, and synthesis of literature on a topic of their choice; refine a topic for dissertation research; and make an informed decision between the quantitative and qualitative sequences. Prerequisite: SCG 775
Prerequisites:
SCG 775 and status as an EDD student is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 735

QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS I

This course is designed to provide doctoral level students with theoretical and practical preparation in quantitative research design including: instrumentation; data collection; statistical analysis; ethics and politics of the conduct of research; and development of analytical skills for critiquing quantitative research. Students will have the opportunity to work with real databases to conduct both univariate and multivariate analyses, including correlations, ANOVAS, and multiple regressions. Prerequisite: SCG 785.
Prerequisites:
SCG 785 and status as an EDD student is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 745

QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS I

This course is designed to provide doctoral level students with theoretical and practical preparation in qualitative methods including: data collection and analysis; ethics and the politics of the conduct of research; and critical analytical skills for review and critique of qualitative research. Students will be introduced to a range of approaches to qualitative inquiry that may include: narrative inquiry; ethnography; case study; phenomenology; grounded theory; and participatory action research from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Prerequisite: SCG 785.
Prerequisites:
SCG 785 and status as an EDD student is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 755

QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS II

A continuation of SCG 735. Students will prepare a methodology section of a research project and will learn how to write up quantitative results of their analyses. By the end of the course students should be able to: understand quantitative methodological approaches; select appropriate data collection strategies; conduct the appropriate analysis for the research question(s) proposed and the nature of the data; and be prepared to write a candidacy paper. Prerequisite: SCG 735.
Prerequisites:
SCG 755 and status as an EDD student is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 765

QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS II

A continuation of SCG 745. Students will conduct a pilot study on an issue of interest using a qualitative research design. By the end of the course students should be able to: understand qualitative methodological approaches; select appropriate data collection strategies; conduct the appropriate analysis for the research question(s) proposed and the nature of the data; and be prepared to write a candidacy paper. Prerequisite: SCG 745.
Prerequisites:
SCG 745 and status as an EDD student is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 527

GLOBAL ISSUES IN EDUCATION

Studies of school systems outside the United States, their methods, curriculum and achievements.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Social & Cultural Foundations in Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

SCG 611

PROSEMINAR: PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES IN EDUCATION, CULTURE AND ETHICS

Examines both traditional philosophical questions in education from such perspectives as Africana, feminist, Latino/Hispanic thought and distinctively Africana, feminist, and Latino/Hispanic issues in a philosophical way. Some of the perspectives are, for example, the necessary conditions of a humanistic education, the relation between theory and practice, the relationship between individual and institutional/society, the role of education in the struggle for social justice, the role of aesthetics in human development and projects of political emancipation, the dialectics of history and experience in the development of liberatory ideas, and the moral and ethical dimensions of education.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Social & Cultural Foundations in Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

CS 489

CREATIVITY AND CRITICAL THINKING - VYGOTSKY, BAKHTIN, MAKIGUCHI, IKEDA

Introduces students to the educational philosophies of Russian thinkers Lev Vygotsky (1896 - 1934) and Mikhail Bakhtin (1895 - 1975) and Japanese thinkers Tsunesaburo Makiguchi (1871 - 1944) and Daisaku Ikeda (1928 - ). Students will locate confluences in these thinkers' philosophies and apply them to current curriculum or curriculum theorizing in their chosen discipline(s) (e.g., mathematics, social studies, language education, etc.), context(s) (e.g., policy, gender, socioeconomics, identity, etc.) and K-12/adult level(s). Topics covered include, among others, cultural-historical theory, socially constructed meaning making, zone of proximal development, dialogism, carnival, value and value-creating pedagogy, humanitarian competition, and human revolution.

CS 588

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN CURRICULUM STUDIES

Independent Study in Curriculum Studies.

A&S 598

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

Independent study
Prerequisites:
Status as a student in a College of Education Advanced Master's program is a prerequisite for this class.

BBE 404

LANGUAGE, LITERACY AND CULTURE

(4 credits) Examines the interdisciplinary study of language and literacy in their cultural, social, and political contexts, with emphasis on linguistically diverse communities and the implications for human developmental processes. Explores the social and political conditions that endorse different language and literacy practices and doctrines and create anti-bilingual education ideologies in the U.S. Topics include language and literacy and ethinicity, identity, social class, and gender, among other related topics.

BBE 466

FIRST AND SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION

(4 credits) Addresses the relationship between language development and use and social, emotional, cognitive, and physical development of children. Introduces the study of bilingualism by examining theoretical constructs and research in psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, and applied linguistics. Includes an analysis of language contact phenomena, cross-linguistic transfer, language alteration, language shift and loss, and bilingualism (includes 15 clinical hour requirement).

BBE 406

SOCIOCULTURAL AND HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES IN BILINGUAL EDUCATION

(4 credits) Presents theoretical constructs of bilingual schooling in the U.S. and other multilingual societies from historical, theoretical and sociocultural perspectives. Emphasizes issues in bilingual education related to the sociocultural and legal aspects of language policy and bilingual education in the U.S. The historical trajectory of language policy and bilingual education in the U.S. is discussed in reference to Native American languages and early European settlers' language schooling practices. The focus shifts to 20th and 21st century bilingual education and immigration policies that have influenced both the advocacy for and opposition to bilingual education as well as the movement to make English the official language in the U.S.

BBE 510

SPECIAL TOPICS IN LANGUAGE EDUCATION

This course is designed to explore a specific area of study in the field of linguistics, such as sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, applied linguistics, language planning and policy, and cognitive bilingualism, among other related topics. The particular focus of study will vary and change as the course is offered.

BBE 526

THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF ESL AND WLE

Presents an introduction to the field of second and world language, with attention to basic concepts of second language acquisition in various language learning contexts. Discusses interdisciplinary perspectives of second and world language acquisition and their application to classroom practices. Topics include interlanguage, communicative competence, D/discourses, investment/motivation, sociocultural approaches to language learning, universal grammar, etc. The different factors influencing the acquisition of ESL and WLE are examined as well as current research in applied linguistics and different approaches to language teaching.

BBE 530

LATINOS AND EDUCATION

This course examines historical and current issues related to the education of Latinos in the US that includes PK-12 and higher education. The course explores the sociolinguistic, theoretical, historical, sociocultural, legal, and political contexts that shape the educational experience of Latinos in the US. Demographic trends and data are examined in light of the various characteristics that make up the diverse Latino population. The course also analyses the theoretical, historical, and political constructs of bilingual schooling and the underlying assumptions and implications for Latino students. Current research conducted by prominent scholars in the field are presented and examined. The course considers factors that influence, positively or negatively, the educational attainment of Latino students. The readings and class discussions emphasize how power relations in the wider society influence patterns in Latino education outcomes and policy-making. The course also examines arguments, assumptions, and interpretations of current and past legislation in regards to the education of Latinos in the US.

A&S 803

SCHOOL PROGRAMS, PLANT AND HUMAN RESOURCES

The development of school programs, based on current research and school laws and regulations, will be explored. The focus will be on the core curriculum, Education and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), State Chapter I, Bilingual and Special Education mandates and opportunities as well as on other discretionary school programs. Responsibilities in relation to plant operation and management, staffing formulas for all staff, developing job descriptions, recuitment, and staff selection and evaluation are included.
Prerequisites:
A&S 803 and status as an EDD student are a prerequisite of this class.

A&S 823

COMMUNITY AND CONSENSUS BUILDING FOR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT

Students will examine inclusive models for consensus building among school/community members that engage membership in processes and decision making through data collection, self-analysis, mission/vision development, goal setting and program planning, implementation and evaluation that leads to school and community improvement. Attention will be given to establishing linkages with local municipal, state, and federal resources, business and industrial recources, community services, and other community resources.
Prerequisites:
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 843

THE POLITICS OF SCHOOLING

Students will engage in analyzing educational policy and the political processes related to problem identificaiton, problem solving, decision making, the underlying political processes and their impact on the school/community, students, parents, educators, staff, and community members. The role of such entities as, school boards, unions, professional associations, businesses, university preparation programs, book and test publishers, and local, state, and natioanl policy makers in the education political arena will be analyzed. Attention will be given to the means by which support for change is developed with special emphasis on collaborative dialogue and teamwork for political action. Strategies for coalition buiding, and individual and collective action will be informed by the use of theory from applied behavioral science and political science.
Prerequisites:
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 873

CURRENT TRENDS IN BUDGETING AND FINANCE

This course focuses on the priorities of school funding. Financial decisions undergird instructional programs and administrative decision making. Relating these to available money and funding, setting priorities and maximizing the impact on student achievement will be studied.
Prerequisites:
A&S 494 or equivalent and status as an EDD student are a prerequisite of this class.

A&S 883

SCHOOL LAW

This course examines the current legal requirements of schools and how changes impact schools. Administrators make decisions that respond to many realities, including the rules and regulations at the local, state, and national levels. The administrator works within a constantly changing system. The duties and liabilities of school administrators as determined by federal rules and regulations, state school codes, the policies of boards of education, and case law will be examined.
Prerequisites:
A&S 495 and status as an EDD student are a prerequisite of this class.

A&S 706

CANDIDACY PAPER

(0 credit) Registration in this course is required of all students who are not enrolled in a course but are completing a dissertation. It provides access to university facilities. Permission of advisor required. This registration indicates that a student has successfully completed the candidacy paper as specified in the Doctoral Student Handbook. $50 per quarter.
Prerequisites:
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 849

SUPERVISED DISSERTATION PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT

Students register for this course for the quarter in which they defend their dissertation proposals. Permission of dissertation chair required.
Prerequisites:
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 859

INDEPENDENT DISSERTATION RESEARCH: EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

Students register for this course for the quarter in which they defend their dissertation. Permission of dissertation chair required.
Prerequisites:
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 899

SUPERINTENDENT INTERNSHIP

This course is intended for those seeking the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) Superintendent Endorsement. The experiences provided are designed to enrich the students' theoretical background with practical opportunities to participate in major functions and critical duties at the district, regional and/or central office level. The student will be cooperatively assigned to site(s) and be supervised by the on-site superintendent and a DePaul faculty member.
Prerequisites:
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.