​Course Requirements

Content Area Prerequisites

A transcript evaluation will be completed upon admission to the program.  If deficiencies exist, they must be completed prior to student teaching.

  • College coursework in Writing
  • College coursework in Fine Arts or Literature
  • College coursework in Mathematics
  • College coursework in Science
  • College coursework in American Government or U.S. History
  • College coursework in Social Science 

Pre-Education Introductory Core: 20 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Advanced Standing

All Education students have a two stage admission process.  Upon being admitted to the College of Education students begin as a Pre-Education Teacher Candidate.  Requirements must be met to progress in the major and take courses in the Advanced Standing category:

  • All students must complete specific requirements in order to take the Advanced Standing courses.  Requirements include:
    • Pass the Illinois Certification Basic Skills Test or Test of Academic Proficiency (TAP)
    • Cumulative GPA of 3.00 
    • A minimum of 8 quarter hours completed at DePaul
    • ​Petition for Advanced Standing form

You can apply for advanced standing once you have completed the above requirements by submitting the Petition for Advanced Standing form.

Advanced Standing Courses: 48 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Student Teaching Requirements

Student Teaching is the culminating clinical experience in the student's program. All students in teacher preparation programs must meet the following requirements before applying for student teaching:

Academic Requirements

  • Completion of all Content Area Prerequisites, Pre-Education, and Advanced Standing courses
  • Overall cumulative G.P.A. of 3.00 or better
  • Meet all other program requirements  (e.g., residency requirements)
  • Meet designated program standards
  • Pass the required Illinois licensure content area tests (see below)

Clinical Requirements

  • Completion of all required field experiences
  • Three satisfactory evaluations in field experiences
  • Three satisfactory faculty recommendations
  • Attendance at mandatory meeting for student teaching
  • Application for student teaching, resume, transcripts, and writing sample (check deadlines)
  • Review and approval by Student Teaching Committee of the College of Education.

Student Teaching Timeline and Deadlines

  • Attend a Mandatory Meeting approximately 1 year prior to expected quarter of student teaching.
  • Submit application for student teaching after attending Mandatory Meeting, approximately 1 year prior to student teaching.

Academic requirements (above) due one quarter before expected quarter of student teaching.

Clinical requirements (above) are completed as course requirements.  Field experience hours are entered by the student as the requirement is attached to coursework.  Online Faculty Evaluations are entered by the instructor as attached to courses.  All data must be entered in the Field Experience Documentation System (FEDS) due one month prior to student teaching. 

Individual school districts may have additional requirements (application, training, background check, etc.) 

Student Teaching: 12 quarter hours required, grade of B- or better required

Licensure Tests

​All individuals licensed by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) are required to complete licensure tests specific to their teaching license. 

Dual Certification (Licensure) students must complete the following tests:

  • Test of Academic Proficiency (TAP) (test #400) - assesses knowledge of reading comprehension, language arts, writing, and math.  Test is required to qualify for Advanced Standing.  ​*Check with your advisor about qualifying for a waiver with acceptable ACT or SAT test scores.​
  • Elementary Content Area Test (test #110) – assesses knowledge of the content of what is taught at the elementary level.  Test is required before Student Teaching (deadlines apply).
  • LBS1 Content Area Test (test #155) – assesses knowledge of working with students with disabilities and special needs.  Test is required before Student Teaching (deadlines apply).
  • Special Education General Curriculum Test (test #163) – assesses knowledge of reading & literacy, mathematics, natural science, and social science.  Test is required before Student Teaching (deadlines apply)​.
  • Assessment of Professional Teaching (APT) (test #104, grades K-12) – assesses knowledge of teaching practice and classroom scenarios.  Test is required to be licensed; recommended to take before Student Teaching.

Field Experiences

Each student seeking licensure from the College of Education/Professional Education Unit must complete supervised field experiences in appropriate settings in conjunction with education courses. 200 hours of non-paid pre-student teaching field experience are required.  Special requirements include: regular and special education settings, experiences in inclusive settings, special education experiences at the high school level.   All field experiences must be completed prior to final approval for student teaching. Field experience hours should be entered by the student into the FEDS system when completing courses with field experience requirements. 

EDU 25

BASIC TECHNOLOGY LITERACY

(0 Credit) This online course provides students with a knowledge about assembling, using, and troubleshooting basic technology hardware and software. In this course, students demonstrate understanding of basic computer setup and the use of peripheral devices such as printers, speakers, flash drives, scanners, digital cameras, videos, and computer software.

LSI 442

SURVEY AND CHARACTERISTICS OF THE EXCEPTIONAL LEARNER

A survey of exceptional learners and characteristics of students with both high and low incidence disabilities, with consideration of alternative placements appropriate for children with various disabilities including the learning disabled. Emphasis on historical, theoretical, practical and legal implications and issues, as well as on the roles of special education professionals, including consultation and collaboration, in inclusion of exceptional learners.

SCG 401

ADVANCED DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Current research and theories in human development relating to motivation, personality, learning and socialization. Case studies and an analysis of various developmental problems.

SCG 408

EDUCATION AND SOCIETY

A study of social forces that impinge upon the educational enterprise and analysis of the relationship to major social problems in urban education with emphasis on their social, economic, political, historical and philosophical dimensions.

T&L 409

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

This course is an introduction to the professional roles required of elementary school teachers. Students will develop a knowledge-based framework for considering the many factors involved in decision-making in an elementary classroom. This framework will serve to guide students as they create a social studies curriculum unit, which integrates planning skills, teaching strategies, classroom management and evaluation techniques. Daytime clinical hours are required during this course. (Only for Dual Cert majors).

T&L 418

LEARNING THROUGH THE ARTS

This course focuses on the arts (visual art, music, drama and dance) as an integral component of teaching and learning in the elementary school curriculum. Students will explore a variety of art forms and disciplines to develop a critical aesthetic and artistic vocabulary. Students learn to help children utilize artistic media in the exploration and expression of thoughts and feelings. Emphasis is placed on design, construction, and implementation, and assessment of authentic conceptual classroom arts activities that integrate the arts with other classroom curricula. Daytime clinical hours (10) are required during this course. Formerly CDG 418. COREQUISITES: For T&L EE majors, concurrent enrollment in SCG 408 is required.

LSI 443

PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS AND METHODS IN DIAGNOSIS

Principles of measurement and test construction including an evaluation of standardized test instruments. Principles of broad-based assessment involving case history, criterion-referenced tests and informal assessment. Emphasis on understanding the strengths and limitations of a wide variety of assessment instruments.

LSI 458

TEACHING STUDENTS WITH HIGH INCIDENCE DISABILITIES I

Introduction to the theoretical and practical approaches to instruction for students with high incidence disabilities across ages and levels of severity. Emphasis on developing an understanding of supportive learning environments, classroom and behavior management; developing collaborative practices with multiple service providers and families to meet the needs of diverse learners with high incidence disabilities. Strategies and materials for improving the social, emotional, and academic adjustment and functioning of students with high incidence disabilities are examined. Includes teaching social and emotional curricula; developing and implementing functional behavioral assessment; and monitoring growth and development in targeted areas. Strategies to increase the individual's self awareness, self-management, self control, self reliance, and self esteem are considered. (Prerequisite: LSI 442).

LSI 461

COLLABORATIVE PRACTICE AND SPECIAL EDUCATION

The purpose of this course is to develop pre-service teachers' understanding of the importance of developing and maintaining collaborative relationships with parents and professionals in educational environments. Students will develop an understanding of professional and legal responsibilities, networks, organizations, and services available for students with disabilities and their families. Students will also examine various educational models for working collaboratively with teachers, parents, and support personnel in classrooms and schools. Students will articulate a personal philosophy and strategies for working collaboratively with families, teachers, paraprofessionals, and other professionals within educational environments.

LSI 462

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES I: ACCESSING GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM

This course focuses general theories of learning, instructional modifications, accommodations, grouping strategies, technology, and assessments used for helping to provide students with disabilities access to general education curricula. Course topics will focus on the effectiveness of these strategies for working with students with mild, moderate, and severe disabilities. Students will begin to articulate a personal philosophy and approaches designed to enhance the educational experiences of children and youth with disabilities and they will begin to examine the relationship between schooling and long term outcomes.

LSI 467

TEACHING STUDENTS WITH HIGH INCIDENCE DISABILITIES II

Continued study of the theoretical and practical approaches to instruction for students with high incidence disabilities across ages and levels of severity. Translation of diagnostic information into teaching strategies and development of an instructional plan (IEP) including transition needs. Emphasis on understanding theoretical models of literacy, literacy development, instructional strategies, and adjusting literacy instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners. Principles of diagnostic teaching will be discussed. Specific teaching techniques and materials will be reviewed, including appropriate uses of technology. (Prerequisite: LSI 442).

LSI 468

TEACHING STUDENTS WITH LOW INCIDENCE DISABILITIES I

Introduction to the theoretical and practical approaches to instruction of children with low incidence disabilities including functional assessment and instructional strategies, curricular options and adaptations, as well as levels of participation and accommodation in the general curriculum. Emphasis will be placed on understanding theoretical models of language development and communication, instructional strategies for language and communication, and adjusting language instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners. Candidates will explore individualized planning (IEPs), transition needs, integration of related services into the instructional program, and strategies and materials for improving the social, emotional, and academic functioning of diverse students with low-incidence disabilities. (Prerequisite: LSI 442).

LSI 469

TEACHING STUDENTS WITH LOW INCIDENCE DISABILITIES II

Continued study of the theoretical and practical approaches to instruction for diverse students with low incidence disabilities. Focuses on addressing the intellectual, educational, physical, motor, health, social, and transitional needs of diverse students with more severe low incidence disabilities. Examination of etiological factors, growth, development, and long-term outcomes. Developing collaborative efforts with family and multiple care and service providers is addressed. Provides strategies to facilitate maintenance and generalization of both academic and non-academic skills across learning environments. Includes experiences with assistive technology, community-based instruction, and designing and implementing a functional curriculum when needed. (Prerequisite: LSI 442).

SCG 410

INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH: PURPOSES, ISSUES, AND METHODOLOGIES

(formerly CUG 400) This course will examine the basic questions, issues and theoretical frameworks central to the purpose, conceptualization, conduct, writing, reading and the use of educational research as a means for informing educational theory, practice and policy. Students will be exposed to the multiple frameworks which inform education research, the various methodologies employed in collecting and analyzing data and will examine the advantages, limitations and values implicit in conducting and evaluating research.

SCG 439

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY OF YOUTH AND MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION

This course examines foundational and contemporary theories of youth and adolescent development. It considers how these theoretical ideas relate to contemporary questions of youth and middle level education. The course explores the historical invention of adolescence, changing ideas about the meaning of childhood, as well as some of the broader social, economic, political, and cultural implications of these changing ideas. This course seeks to develop in prospective educators a broader capacity to theorize about youth and schooling, and, hence, to act critically and reflectively in multiple contexts in which youth learn.

T&L 413

READING/LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE MIDDLE GRADES

This course extends Emerging Reading and Language Arts to facilitate increased independence in students as strategic readers and competent writers. It focuses on the further development of reading comprehension and writing abilities in the intermediate grades and middle school. Emphasis is placed on the complex nature of literacy addressing issues such as content-area literacies, learning in and across languages, and critically consuming and producing a wide variety of texts (including online, multimedia and print based). Application of course material is facilitated through fieldwork focusing on the design, teaching, and reflection on literacy lesson(s) for intermediate learners. PREREQUISITE(S): T&L 412 and Advanced Standing. COREQUISTIES: For T&L EE majors, concurrent enrollment in LSI 446 and T&L 583 in a public school is required.
Prerequisites:
T&L 412 and Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing are a prerequisite for this class.

T&L 415

TEACHING AND LEARNING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCIENCE

This course is an introduction to materials, methods and strategies for helping students in grades K-8 become scientifically literate: ie., to understand the nature of science and its impact on technology and science. Particular attention will be given to theoretical views about how children learn science, the proper use of materials and equipment, the development of scientific thinking, e.g., skills in observing, classifying collecting, and interpreting data, questioning strategies, and ways to assess student progress. Inquiry based lesson plans and case studies invite application of course content. Daytime field required during this course. PREREQUISITE(S): T&L 409 or T&L 404, & Advanced Standing and for T&L EE majors completed application to student teaching. COREQUISTES: For T&L EE majors, concurrent enrollment in T&L 419 and T&L 584 is required.
Prerequisites:
Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing is a prerequisite for this class.

T&L 416

TEACHING AND LEARNING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL MATHEMATICS

This course is an introduction to materials, processes for developing, and strategies for mathematical literacy in grades K-8. Particular attention will be given to the theoretical views about how children learn mathematics, the proper use of manipulative materials, the development of mathematical thinking, e.g., skills in estimation, pattern recognition, or spatial perception; the use of technology, and ways to assess student progress. Lesson planning, teaching, and critical reflection are an integral component of this course. Clinical hours required. PREREQUISITE(S): T&L 409 or T&L 404 and Advanced Standing. COREQUISITES: For T&L EE majors, concurrent enrollment in T&L 412 and T&L 583 is required.
Prerequisites:
Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing is a prerequisite for this class.

LSI 585

STUDENT TEACHING AND SEMINAR IN SPECIAL EDUCATION-ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

Five school days per week in supervised teaching experience for a full academic quarter. Students will also attend a student teaching seminar one day per week where they will discuss issues related to this experience. Faculty advisors and the Director of Student Teaching, working in conjunction with individual students, will determine appropriate student teaching placements. (Prerequisite: Permission required).

LSI 465

INDUCTION INTO THE FIELD OF EDUCATION

Designed primarily as a culminating course experience at the graduate level, this course utilizes a seminar approach to help students clarify their understanding of issues related to special education, general education, and teaching in urban schools. All students will prepare a portfolio based on their experiences within the graduate program. These portfolios will contain evidence of each student's development during the program and students will make connections between their own theoretical, philosophical, and professional orientations and the Urban Professional Multicultural Model.

LSI 96

FIELD EXPERIENCE FOR DUAL CERTIFICATION

(non-credit) Required of all Dual Certification students. Observations and participatory experience with children and youth in a school or agency. The observation hours are a prerequisite for student teaching and related professional courses. A total of 200 hours are required.

LSI 549

THESIS RESEARCH IN SPECIALIZED INSTRUCTION

A Master of Arts candidate conducts original research, writes a thesis, and presents an oral defense before a committee of faculty members. PREREQUISTE(S): SCG 410 and approved thesis proposal.