​Course Requirements

Upon completion of the first-year, students may transfer between part-time and full-time status. Part-time evening students who transfer to the full-time program will need to complete some required courses in the evening of their second year as assigned by the College of Law. After completion of the first year, registration for both day and evening elective courses is open to all full-time and part-time students.
 

Core Required Courses 

Advanced Required Courses

Skills Requirement

Choose one of the following:

Advanced Writing Requirement

Choose one of the following:

Electives

Elective courses are open to all students who meet the prerequisites for courses. For information on specializations, see the section on Certificates.  46.0

Juris Doctor (JD) students must complete 86 credit hours to graduate from the College of Law. Full-time students are expected to complete the requirements for the JD degree in three years, part-time students in four years. Typical schedules for the first-year programs are illustrated here. 

LAW 140

CONSTITUTIONAL PROCESS

(4 cr.) Required for JD students. This course analyzes the judicial process in constitutional law cases, focusing primarily upon the decisions of the United States Supreme Court. Emphasis is given to the nature of judicial review, the distribution of governmental power in our federal system, and the Fourteenth Amendment. Topics include the separation of powers, the federal and state commerce authority, implied fundamental rights, and equal protection of law.

LAW 105

CONTRACTS

(4 hrs.) Required for JD. Covers offer and acceptance, consideration, remedies, third party beneficiaries, conditions, anticipatory breach, impossibility and frustration, the Statute of Frauds, discharge and illegality. Common law principles and applicable portions of the Uniform Commercial Code are studied.

LAW 170

TORT LAW

(4 hrs) Required for JD. Provides an introduction to the basic theories underlying the American common law system of compensation for injuries to person and property. The major topics covered are intentional torts, negligence, strict liability and damages.

LAW 112

LEGAL ANALYSIS RESEARCH AND COMMUNICATION I

(2 hrs) Required for JD. Designed to develop the first-year student's professional writing skills by involving students in a structured analysis of good and bad legal writing, as well as applying the principles and methods of legal analysis to specific writing tasks. Lectures on research tools, including an explanation of the major legal publications and their uses are also provided. Emphasis is given to research techniques and legal citiation form.

LAW 120

CIVIL PROCEDURE

(4 hrs) Required for JD. A basic survey of the fundamental principles which control the allocation and use of judicial power in the American legal system. The principle areas of inquiry include subject matter jurisdiction, personal jurisdiction, phases of a law suit, problems of diversity jurisdiction and former adjudication.

LAW 506

CRIMINAL LAW

3 credit hours. Required for J.D. students. Provides a survey of the substantive law of crimes and defenses. This course includes a study of specific crimes, elements of criminal liability, and the purposes of punishment.

LAW 160

PROPERTY

(4 hrs) Required for JD. Basic concepts of the law of property are covered through a survey of the holding of wealth and transactions in the family and commercial context, with the attendant public policy limitations on owner control. Specific topics include: concepts of ownership and possession; the divisibility of title; present and future interests; bailments; the landlord-tenant relation; interests in the land of another; recording; gifts; contracts of sale; land financing; public and private control of land use.

LAW 119

LEGAL ANALYSIS RESEARCH AND COMMUNICATIONS II

(3 hrs) Required for JD. Lecture on legal research skills, primary legal publications, research techniques, and legal citation form.
Prerequisites:
LAW 112 is a prerequisite for this class.

LAW 481

LEGAL PROFESSION

(3 hrs) Required for all JD students. Explores the role of the legal profession in American society. Legal education, admission to the bar, organization of the practicing bar, discipline, unauthorized practice, group legal services and other current problems are discussed.

LAW 115

LEGAL ANALYSIS RESEARCH AND COMMUNICATION III

(3 hrs) Builds upon the analysis, research and communication skills established in the first-year required classes. Focuses on appellate brief writing and oral advocacy skills.
Prerequisites:
LAW 112 and LAW 119 is a prerequisite for this class.

LAW 290

ANATOMY OF A DEAL: FROM INCEPTION TO CLOSING

(2 credit hours) This course will provide law students with skills they will need as entry-level transactional lawyers. The focus will be on how to perform due dilligence and how to draft resolutions, corporate documents, various closing documents and third-party opinion letters. Students will also study sample agreemenets that appear in many different types of deals, including commitment papers, indemnities, guaranties, escrows, pledge agreements, and security agreements.

LAW 460

BUSINESS PLANNING

(3 credit hours) Combines advanced work in business organizations, securities law and federal taxation in the context of business planning and counseling.
Prerequisites:
LAW 210 or LAW 212 is a prerequisite for this class.

LAW 453

COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION

(3 hrs) This course is designed to teach students the necessary skills to become effective advocates in the commercial arbitration process. Students develop arbitration skills through role-play exercises, including actual advocacy in simulated arbitrations. Additionally, the course teaches the juris prudence of commercial arbitration, the evolution of the case law in the field and where arbitration fits within the spectrum of dispute resolution processes. The course also teaches students to critically evaluate the ethical and professional issues in the field of arbitration.

LAW 356

DISPUTE RESOLUTION

(3 hrs) Gives students the means to evaluate critically dispute resolution processes as a basis for counseling clients in the selection of and participation in a process appropriate for the resolution of a particular dispute. Students, who are divided into teams, alternate the roles of attorney and client, attempt to resolve a complex civil case utilizing three dispute resolution processes: pre-trial conference, medication and arbitration. Each team works with two associates from a financial consulting or an accounting firm who are their expert witnesses to prepare for and participate in these processes. Lawyers, professional mediators and professional arbitrators act as the neutrals in the three processes. From year to year, different substantive areas are the focus of the problem, and Intellectual Property is one of the problems.

LAW 570

ELECTRONIC DISCOVERY

This course will provide an in-depth treatment of both the legal and technical aspects of electronic discovery and provide the student with a detailed grounding in the law and application of electronic discovery principles to civil and criminal litigation. 2 credit hours - held 9 weeks

LAW 537

INTERNATIONAL MOOT COURT COMPETITION

(3 hrs) Students who are selected for the International Moot Court Team must register for the course. The competitions are an advanced problem-oriented study of appellate brief writing and oral advocacy.

LAW 429

LEGAL CLINIC I

(3-6 hrs) Students work in one of the clinic modules under the supervision of a clinical attorney concentrating on real life problems with real clients and organizations. Instructor's permission required.

LAW 419

LITIGATION STRATEGY: PRE-TRIAL, CIVIL

(3 hrs) Offers a comprehensive treatment of the key problems encountered in the pretrial stages of civil litigation, including drafting of the complaint, case planning, interrogatories and other written discovery and pretrial orders. Students conduct simulated pretrial motions, client interviews, fact investigations, counseling, negotiating, and settlement sessions. Simulated depositions and motions argument, as well as similated pretrial conferences, are conducted during class session.
Prerequisites:
LAW 410 is a prerequisite for this class.

LAW 319

LITIGATION STRATEGY: PRE-TRIAL, CRIMINAL

(3 hrs) Offers comprehensive treatment of the key problems encountered in the pretrial stages of the criminal case, including fact investigation, motions to suppress evidence, plea negotiations, preliminary hearings, arraignment, and pretrial conferences. Students conduct simulated pretrial motions, client interviews, fact investigations, counseling, negotiating and settlement sessions. Simulated depositions and motions are argued, as well as simulated pretrial conferences, are conducted during class.
Prerequisites:
LAW 410 and LAW 518 are a prerequisite for this class.

LAW 438

MEDIATION

(3 hrs) Designed for students who seek to understand the application of the zealous representation standard within the mediation process. The course provides students with a basis to evaluate critically when and how to represent clients in mediation. They experience the mediation process through classroom simulations as mediators, attorneys and clients. Through simulated teaching methology, students focus on effective advocacy in mediation.

LAW 536

NATIONAL MOOT COURT COMPETITION

(3 hrs) Students who are selected for one of the National Moot Court Teams must register for the course. The competitions are an advanced problem-oriented study of appellate brief writing and oral advocacy. Graded pass/fail.

LAW 475

NEGOTIATIONS

Analyzes and uses problem solving to explore the use of negotiation techniques in the legal setting. 3 credit hours.

LAW 450

TRIAL ADVOCACY I

(3 hrs) Examines fundamental trial techniques. Students are expected to perform simulated courtroom exercises in voir dire, opening statements, direct and cross-examination, introduction of exhibits, closing arguments, objections and trial motions. Students are also required to prepare trial books and exhibits and to participate in a simulated bench trial.
Prerequisites:
LAW 410 is a prerequisite for this class.

LAW 250

SENIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR

(3 hrs) Required for JD. The student must write an in-depth paper of Law Review quality on a topic of the professor's choosing.

LAW 428

INDEPENDENT STUDY

(3 hrs) Students who have earned at least a 3.00 g.p.a. after completion of at least 40 credits may undertake independent study under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. The student must produce an indepth research paper of publishable quality not substantially covered by a currently offered course. Fulfills the Seminar requirements. Instructor's permission required.

LAW 455

LEGAL DRAFTING

(3 hrs) Legal drafting courses on various topics give students an opportunity to hone their research and writing skills on an advanced legal. Students may take one course per semester. All courses are limited enrollment.

LAW 251

DEATH PENALTY DEFENSE PRACTICUM

(3 credit hours) The Death Penalty Defense Practicum is essentially will be a hybrid course. Students can register for it as a clinic or as their senior writing requirement. Students will work with Professor Lyon to provide resources to capitally charged individuals and their counsel without actually taking on the direct representation of those individuals in other states such as Georgia, Texas, Alabama and Arizona. This four credit course will teach basic death penalty law and we accept requests from capital defenders to do research and writing that they need help with. This might take the form of an amicus brief, a motion and memorandum of law, a thorough examination of the literature in a forensic area and the like. Some direct representation may be done by the clinic, and so the opportunity to do investigation, and appear in court will also be available.