Course Requirements

Open Electives

Open elective credit also is required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours.

 

DC 206

HISTORY OF CINEMA PRODUCTION

This course studies the origins and rise of cinema production from the perspective of a filmmaker. The course examines critical historical events that impacted the industry and the craft of filmmaking; the emergence of the studio system, the coming of sound, audience shifts, emergence of other media and the rise of digital technology. PREREQUISITE(S): NONE.

DC 210

DIGITAL CINEMA PRODUCTION I

This course is a beginning workshop in narrative film production. The course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of cinema, including camera and lens technology, composition, lighting, directing and sound recording. Utilizing digital technology, students will produce several films with an emphasis on visual storytelling and personal expression. This course has an additional fee. PREREQUISITE(S): DC 220

DC 222

CLASSIC HOLLYWOOD FILM STRUCTURE

Critical analysis of successful Hollywood films and their narrative structures. Films of various genres and eras will be examined. Students will learn how to recognize classical three-act structure in finished films and scripts. Students will develop a cinematic language with which to discuss films as well as a toolbox of techniques to use when making films. Key story concepts to be discussed include: protagonist, antagonist, want versus need, elements of the future, poetic justice, planting and payoff, catalyst, climax, and Aristotelian terminology. PREREQUISITE(S): NONE

DC 224

SCRIPT TO SCREEN

This analytical course examines the screenplay's evolution to the screen from a writer's perspective. Students will read feature length scripts of varying genres and then perform a critical analysis and comparison of the text to the final produced versions of the films. Storytelling conventions such as structure, character development, theme, and the creation of tension will be used to uncover alterations and how these adjustments ultimately impacted the film's reception.

DC 227

FILM PHILOSOPHY

An introduction to philosophy, using film as a lens through which philosophical ideas are examined. In discussion and writing, students analyze narrative or documentary films (classic or contemporary) on enduring philosophical questions such as: what is truth; what is right; or what is the meaning of life.

DC 235

ADAPTATION: THE CINEMATIC RECRAFTING OF MEANING

This course explores contemporary cinematic adaptations of literature and how recent re-workings in film open viewers up to critical analysis of the cultural practices surrounding the promotion and reception of these narratives. What issues have an impact upon the borrowing and reinterpreting of narratives of film? How, when, and where can we identify such borrowings and reinterpretations in multiple contemporary iterations of the same narrative? PREREQUISITE(S): NONE

DC 270

TOPICS IN DIGITAL CINEMA

Advanced study in cinema focusing on a specific genre each quarter such as: Science Fiction, Film Noir, Comedy, Action-Adventure, Nonfiction, etc. Please check the CTI website for description of specific quarter offerring.

DC 370

ADVANCED TOPICS IN CINEMA

This class will be an in-depth examination of a filmmaker, film genre, or film movement that has had a significant influence on the development of cinematic storytelling and expression. Through lectures, screenings, readings, discussions, and critical writing assignments, students will analyze the distinctive traits of the selected topic within the broader context of cinema history and culture. Specific topics will be selected by the instructor and will vary with each quarter. PREREQUISITE(S): None

DC 272

INTRODUCTION TO TELEVISION WRITING

The primary objective of this course is to learn how to write for television, for both network and cable, focusing on fiction and non-fiction TV programs including news, talk, documentaries, dramas and comedies. The course will assist students in improving their writing skills as well as help them understand the basic approaches and techniques in writing for television. Prerequisites: DC 201

DC 301

ADVANCED SCREENWRITING I

In this course, students study, analyze and produced motion picture scripts. This course emphasizes the use of traditional storytelling, classic mythology and how these devices apply to contemporary screenplays. Students will move from concept/treatment to a completed first act of a feature length screenplay of their own. This script will be completed, revised, and polished in DC 302 and DC 303. PREREQUISITE(S):NONE

DC 302

ADVANCED SCREENWRITING II

This course focuses on the writing of the second and third acts of feature length screenplays. Students finish and begin revising the first draft of the script started in DC 301. Emphasis is placed on proper character development, effective use of conflict, and adherence to the three act structure. PREREQUISITE(S): DC301

DC 303

REWRITING THE FEATURE FILM SCRIPT

This class focuses on practical ways to approach the rewriting process for feature film screenplays. Through group workshops and assignments, students isolate issues with plot, character development, dialogue and pacing in their script and work on addressing them in a full draft rewrite. Student must posses a complete feature length script in order to enroll in the course. PREREQUISITE(S): DC 302

DC 344

ADVANCED SCREENWRITING LAB

This advanced course is designed to take existing writing projects (including but not limited to features, pilots, television specs, web series, short scripts) at various stages of development and provide the practical means to move forward through constructive workshop sessions. Stories will be broken down to examine concept viability and the overall execution of the narrative. Instructor and peer critiques will challenge the writer to enhance their voice on the page with the goal of creating work that is unique, engaging, and commercial. PREREQUISITE(S): DC 101 or DC 201

DC 304

TOPICS IN SCREENWRITING

Advanced study in screenwriting focusing on a specific genre each quarter such as: Science Fiction, Film Noir, Comedy, Action-Adventure, Nonfiction, etc. May be repeated for credit. PREREQUISITES: DC 101, DC 201 or by consent of the instructor

DC 306

WRITING THE SITCOM

This course focuses on the fundamentals of writing the half-hour situational comedy. Creating comedic characters, situations, and developing multiple storylines are covered. Students will create an original sitcom pilot. PREREQUISITE(S): DC 272

DC 307

WRITING THE EPISODIC DRAMA

This course examines the storytelling techniques necessary to write an hour long television dramatic series with an emphasis on characterization and structure. Students will create an original hour long pilot. PREREQUISITE(S): DC 272

DC 308

WRITING ON ASSIGNMENT

Modeled after professional writing assignments, this advanced course challenges students to complete a feature length screenplay in ten weeks. Lectures and strict weekly page submission deadlines provide a practical framework on how to write quickly without sacrificing quality. Constructive analysis will be used in discussing produced scripts, weekly assignments and group workshops to reveal the writer's unique voice and perspective. It is imperative students possess a viable concept and outline before enrollilng. PREREQUISITE(S): DC 301

DC 309

FEATURE DEVELOPMENT

This course offers a practical approach to the screenwriter's role in the development of a feature film. Emphasis will be placed on obtaining a greater understanding of narrative conventions, script analysis and the film market. From agents to studio executives, we will examine the varying points of view that comprise the development process. Constructive analysis will be used to break down feature length produced screenplays and student work. The assignments and class discussions are designed to expose the inner working of Hollywood and provide a framework of what it takes to succeed in the entertainment industry. PREREQUISITE(S): DC 101 or DC 201

DC 389

THE BIG PICTURE: THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY

This course introduces students to vital information about the industry in which they will work. Students will learn industrial analysis of production, distribution, and exhibition sectors, including mastering concepts of revenue streams, constructing deals (gross points and net point participation), copyright, marketing, and box office analysis. Students will also study the structure of organizations and groups crucial to the entertainment industry: studios, talent, agents, exhibition (markets: theatrical, virtual and ancillary), professional organizations including guilds like ASC, and media licensing firms like ASCAP and BMI. There will be an emphasis on global industry. Prerequisite: DC 205

DC 229

TELEVISION GENRES

Students will analyze and discuss some of the most important and influential shows in television history. Students will learn all about the writer-centric form of scripted television, where it's been and where it's heading. Students study serials and procedurals, network and cable shows, principal leads, partnerships and ensembles, comedy and drama, prevalent themes, innovations in content and form, the impact of DVR, and the impact of the internet.

DC 110

FOUNDATIONS OF CINEMA FOR MAJORS

This course deals with visualization and cinema literacy skills. Drawing heavily on a wide array of historical examples, the course will examine the many expressive strategies potentially usable in the creation of moving image art forms: image construction and manipulation, editing, composition, sound, narrative, and performance. An emphasis will be placed on story and storytelling. In addition to analyzing the works of others, students will also produce their own projects - putting theory into practice. This course has an additional fee. Prerequisite(s): None