First Yea​r Program

Chicago Quarter

Focal Point

  • ​Not Required

Writing

Quantitative Reasoning & Technological Literacy

Sophomore Year

Multiculturalism in the US

Junior Year

Experiential Learning

Senior Year

Capstone

Learning Domains

Arts and Literature (AL)

Philosophical Inquiry (PI)

  • 1 Course Required

Religious Dimensions (RD)

  • 1 Course Required

Scientific Inquiry (SI)

  • 1 SI Lab Course Required

Self, Society and the Modern World (SSMW)

  • ​1 Course Required

Understanding the Past (UP)

  • 1 Course Required

* Students must earn a C- or better in this course.

Notes

Courses offered in the student's primary major cannot be taken to fulfill LSP Domain requirements. If students double major, LSP Domain courses may double count for both LSP credit and the second major. Students who choose to take an experiential learning course offered by the major may count it either as a general elective or the JYEL requirement.

Quantitative Reasoning and Technological Literacy

Readiness for LSP 120 is determined by the math placement test taken online after admission. Students may need to take developmental coursework prior to LSP 120. The LSP 120 requirement may be waived by credit already earned for advanced math coursework or by passing a dedicated proficiency exam.

LSP 110

DISCOVER CHICAGO

Discover Chicago courses acquaint first-year DePaul students with the metropolitan community, its neighborhoods, cultures, people, institutions, organizations and urban issues. Students also learn about university life, resources, and strategies for how to achieve academically. Learning is accomplished through a variety of means, but particularly through first-hand observation, active participation, personal discovery, and reflection. The course begins with an immersion week one week prior to the official start of the autumn quarter. Classes continue to meet throughout the autumn quarter. Topics for Discover Chicago courses vary and students select one of interest and then investigate the subject using Chicago as a learning lab and site of discovery. First-year students must register for either LSP 110 or LSP 111. Students will receive credit for only one section of LSP 111, Explore Chicago or LSP 110, Discover Chicago. Students who received credit for LSP 111 cannot receive credit for LSP 110. Courses offered during the autumn quarter and available to first-year students only. Formerly ISP 103.

LSP 111

EXPLORE CHICAGO

Explore Chicago courses acquaint first-year DePaul students with the metropolitan community, its neighborhoods, cultures, people, institutions, organizations, and issues. Students also learn about university life, resources, and strategies for how to achive academically. Learning is accomplished through a variety of means, but particularly through lecture, discussion, guest lecturers, first-hand observation, active participation, personal discovery, and reflection. Topics for Explore Chicago courses vary and students select one of interest, and then investigate the subject area using Chicago as a backdrop of inquiry. First-year students must register for either LSP 110 or LSP 111 . Students will receive credit for only one section of LSP 110, (Discover Chicago) or LSP 111, (Explore Chicago). Students who received credit for LSP 110 cannot receive credit for LSP 111. Courses offered during the autumn quarter and available to first-year students only. Formerly ISP 102.

WRD 103

COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC I

An introduction to the forms, expectations, and conventions of writing at the college level. Emphasis on audience analysis, rhetorical stance, and the nature of the composing process.

WRD 104

COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC II

Developing a convincing argument with information and evidence drawn from a variety of sources. Emphasis on effective research strategies and professional use of sources.

LSP 120

QUANTITATIVE REASONING & TECHNOLOGICAL LITERACY I

This course provides a mathematical foundation for students to become confident and critical users of quantitative information of all kinds: numerical, graphical, and verbal. Students analyze data from a wide variety of fields, making and critiquing quantitative arguments. Mathematical topics include proportional reasoning and rates, the making and interpretation of graphs, linear and exponential models, logarithms, and finance. The course is taught in a hands-on laboratory environment where students are introduced to computer tools for data analysis and presentation. PREREQUISITE(S): MAT 100, MAT 101, or demonstrating readiness via the math placement test taken at matriculation. As an alternative to taking LSP 120, this requirement can be met by passing a separate LSP 120 Proficiency Exam (see qrc.depaul.edu). A student whose major requires calculus is exempt from this requirement. Formerly ISP 120.
Prerequisites:
ISP 110 or MAT 100 or MAT 101 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

LSP 200

SEMINAR ON MULTICULTURALISM IN THE UNITED STATES

This course provides the opportunity for students to learn about some dimension of multiculturalism relevant to the United States, as considered in the context of the global community. Multiculturalism includes questions of ethnicity, race, class, gender, language, religion, and sexual orientation. Courses pay attention to the history of multiculturalism; examine the experiences and perspectives of at least three distinct cultural groups; develop a critical perspective about meanings of multiculturalism; and investigate the historical roots of inequalities related to differences in class, ethnicity, gender, age, language, religion, ability, and sexual orientation. Topics of seminars vary and students select a course that interests them. Students can complete only one course numbered LSP 200. Formerly ISP 200.

GD 380

DESIGN FOR CLIENT AND COMMUNITY

This course enables students to work from start to finish on client-based graphic design and projects. Students establish working relationships as individuals and in teams that utilize their skills to effectively evaluate the communication needs of an organization or business, develop design solutions that fulfill those needs, and negotiate the process between designers and clients. Objectives of the course include: improving student's developing design skills to an advanced level, creating awareness of current design trends, supporting student's development of independent working habits, utilizing integration of both hand-skills and the computer as design tools, and completing professional projects after staged client feedback and revisions. PREREQUISITE(S): GD 200 and GD 230

GD 394

CAPSTONE PROJECT I

This two course sequence provide a Graphic Design-specific capstone experience for the student. The capstone course will connect the students' Graphic Design course work with the University courses s/he has taken through three components: student-generated design proposals, class/instructor discussions, and the actual creation/production of the student's proposal. The production piece is the primary focus of this course that takes place over two quarters. PREREQUISITE(S): GD 200 and GD 230

GD 395

CAPSTONE PROJECT II

This two course sequence provide a Graphic Design-specific capstone experience for the student. The capstone course will connect the students' Graphic Design course work with the University courses s/he has taken through three components: student-generated design proposals, class/instructor discussions, and the actual creation/production of the student's proposal. The production piece is the primary focus of this course that takes place over two quarters. PREREQUISITE(S): GD 200 and GD 230

ANI 206

HISTORY OF ANIMATION

This course is an introduction to the history and development of the field of animation. We will explore this subject from various perspectives: by chronology, from its prehistory before the invention of film to the present day; by form, including method and medium; by culture, comparing the US to Japan, Russia, Europe and others; by subject; and by personality, concentrating on the figures who have shaped the art form and continue to influence it through their example. Students are expected to bring an enthusiastic interest in the medium, and to devote serious effort to reading about, viewing, researching and discussing animation and the artists who have created it.

DC 202

HISTORY OF MOTION PICTURE EDITING

This course studies the origins and rise of film editing as an art form, an industry, a set of technological practices ranging from analog film to digital video. The course examines critical historical events that impacted film editing: the emergence of the studio system, the coming of sound, narrative, experimental and documentary film, MTV, and audience shifts. For many, editing is the unique source of the art of filmmaking. This course addresses this question. PREREQUISITE(S): NONE

DC 233

CINEMA & ART

This course will provide an overview of avant-garde film, video, animation and installation, and the relationship of these cinematic forms to Modern and Contemporary art. Students will be introduced to the major styles and themes of alternative and experimental moving image work from the past hundred years. Cinema & Art places emphasis on moving image work that is not usually included in a survey of mainstream cinema or film history. A major concern for the class is first-hand exposure to these original sources, and an examination of the relationship of these works to mainstream cinema and other types of popular culture. Topics covered in the class include the avant-garde and kitsch, Surrealism, experimental film, abstract animation, video art, camp, and video installation. In addition to lectures by visiting artists and viewing films, videos, and installation work, students will produce a short creative work in the style of their choice that responds to the work studied during the quarter.

HAA 277

HISTORY OF CINEMA I, 1890 - 1945 (CROSS-LISTED WITH MCS 207 & DC 207)

This course examines the history of cinema as one of the most influential cultural forms of the 20th Century. We will study the aesthetic and technological developments of cinema during its first 50 years, as well as examine the social and economic factors shaping its history. Initially influenced by other art forms (theater, literature, painting) filmmaking quickly acquired its own formal system, language, and traditions. We will trace the changing styles, techniques, content, and methods of filmmaking as an art form, as popular culture, and as an industry. We will consider how cinema is bound to its social context via audience relations, economics, technology, and ideology. The limited scope of this course will cover primarily feature-length, narratives films as the dominant mode of filmmaking, although we will also look at the development of documentary and experimental filmmaking. The class will consist of lectures, screenings, and discussions. Cross-listed with MCS 207 & DC 207.

HAA 278

HISTORY OF CINEMA II, 1945 - 1975 (CROSS-LISTED WITH/MCS 208 & DC 208)

This course covers the continued rise and development of cinema from 1945 to 1975. The course will have a dual focus, looking simultaneously at both the American studio system and international cinemas. The lectures, screenings, and discussions place equal emphasis on charting the development of cinematic techniques as well as examining the growth of specific national cinemas. In addition, the course surveys international stylistic trends in narrative, documentary, and avant-garde film. Students will acquire a broad understanding of the institutional, social, technological, and aesthetic forces that have shaped the development of cinema during the mid-twentieth century. Lab for film viewing required. Cross-listed with MCS 208 and DC 208.

MCS 209

HISTORY OF CINEMA III, 1975-PRESENT

This final course in the film history sequence is designed to introduce students to a sense of modern film history and the multiple permutations of cinema around the modern film history and the multiple permutations of cinema around the globe. It presents film history from a global perspective, concentrating primarily on the development of new national and transnational cinemas. The course continues to chart the development of the American studios since the mid-1970s while examining the effects of media consolidation and convergence. Moreover, the course seeks to examine how global cinemas have reacted to and dealt with the formal influence and economic domination of Hollywood filmmaking on international audiences. Class lectures, screenings, and discussions will consider how cinema has changed from a primarily national phenomenon to a transnational form of communication in the 21st century.

MCS 208

HISTORY OF CINEMA II, 1945-1975

This course covers the continued rise and development of cinema from 1945 to 1975. The course will have a dual focus, looking simultaneously at both the American studio system and international cinemas. The lectures, screenings, and discussions place equal emphasis on charting the development of cinematic techniques as well as examining the growth of specific national cinemas. In addition, the course surveys international stylistic trends in narrative, documentary, and avant-garde film. Students will acquire a broad understanding of the institutional, social, technological, and aesthetic forces that have shaped the development of cinema during the mid-twentieth century. Lab for film viewing required.

MCS 207

HISTORY OF CINEMA I, 1890-1945

This course examines the history of cinema as one of the most influential cultural forms of the 20th Century. We will study the aesthetic and technological developments of cinema during its first 50 years, as well as examine the social and economic factors shaping its history. Initially influenced by other art forms (theater, literature, painting) filmmaking quickly acquired its own formal system, language, and traditions. We will trace the changing styles, techniques, content, and methods of filmmaking as an art form, as popular culture, and as an industry. We will consider how cinema is bound to its social context via audience relations, economics, technology, and ideology. The limited scope of this course will cover primarily feature-length, narratives films as the dominant mode of filmmaking, although we will also look at the development of documentary and experimental filmmaking. The class will consist of lectures, screenings, and discussions.
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