Design Concentration

First Year Program

Chicago Quarter

Focal Point

Writing

Quantitative Reasoning & Technological Literacy

  • ​Not Required 

Sophomore Year

Multiculturalism in the US

Junior Year

Experiential Learning

  • ​Required

Senior Year

Capstone

  • ​Required*

Learning Domains

Arts and Literature (AL)

  • ​3 Courses Required

Philosophical Inquiry (PI)

Religious Dimensions (RD)

  • ​2 Courses Required

Scientific Inquiry (SI)

  • ​1 SI Lab Course Required

Self, Society and the Modern World (SSMW)

Understanding the Past (UP)

  • 2 Courses Required 
* Students must earn a C- or better in this course.

Notes

Courses offered in the student's primary major cannot be taken to fulfill LSP Domain requirements. If students double major, LSP Domain courses may double count for both LSP credit and the second major. Students who choose to take an experiential learning course offered by the major may count it either as a general elective or the JYEL requirement.

In meeting learning domain requirements, no more than one course that is outside the student’s major and is cross-listed with a course within the student’s major, can be applied to count for LSP domain credit. This policy does not apply to those who are pursuing a double major or earning BFA or BM degrees.​

LSP 110

DISCOVER CHICAGO

Discover Chicago courses acquaint first-year DePaul students with the metropolitan community, its neighborhoods, cultures, people, institutions, organizations and urban issues. Students also learn about university life, resources, and strategies for how to achieve academically. Learning is accomplished through a variety of means, but particularly through first-hand observation, active participation, personal discovery, and reflection. The course begins with an immersion week one week prior to the official start of the autumn quarter. Classes continue to meet throughout the autumn quarter. Topics for Discover Chicago courses vary and students select one of interest and then investigate the subject using Chicago as a learning lab and site of discovery. First-year students must register for either LSP 110 or LSP 111. Students will receive credit for only one section of LSP 111, Explore Chicago or LSP 110, Discover Chicago. Students who received credit for LSP 111 cannot receive credit for LSP 110. Courses offered during the autumn quarter and available to first-year students only. Formerly ISP 103.

LSP 111

EXPLORE CHICAGO

Explore Chicago courses acquaint first-year DePaul students with the metropolitan community, its neighborhoods, cultures, people, institutions, organizations, and issues. Students also learn about university life, resources, and strategies for how to achive academically. Learning is accomplished through a variety of means, but particularly through lecture, discussion, guest lecturers, first-hand observation, active participation, personal discovery, and reflection. Topics for Explore Chicago courses vary and students select one of interest, and then investigate the subject area using Chicago as a backdrop of inquiry. First-year students must register for either LSP 110 or LSP 111 . Students will receive credit for only one section of LSP 110, (Discover Chicago) or LSP 111, (Explore Chicago). Students who received credit for LSP 110 cannot receive credit for LSP 111. Courses offered during the autumn quarter and available to first-year students only. Formerly ISP 102.

LSP 112

FOCAL POINT SEMINAR

Focal Point Seminars provide first-year DePaul students with the opportunity to learn how to closely examine a single topic, such as: a well-known person, place, event, issue, or text. Students discover the complexity of a subject by studying it from the perspectives of multiple disciplines and different fields of inquiry, and by reading and extensively writing about it. Because the class is a seminar, students also debate the topic through lively class discussions. Topics for Focal Point Seminars vary, and students have the opportunity to select a seminar that piques their curiosity, and connects with intellectual goals and interests. Students will receive credit for only one section of LSP 112, Focal Point Seminar. Courses available to first-year students only. Formerly ISP 101.
Prerequisites:
WRD 103 or HON 100 is a prerequisite for this class.

WRD 103

COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC I

An introduction to the forms, expectations, and conventions of writing at the college level. Emphasis on audience analysis, rhetorical stance, and the nature of the composing process.

WRD 104

COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC II

Developing a convincing argument with information and evidence drawn from a variety of sources. Emphasis on effective research strategies and professional use of sources.

LSP 200

SEMINAR ON MULTICULTURALISM IN THE UNITED STATES

This course provides the opportunity for students to learn about some dimension of multiculturalism relevant to the United States, as considered in the context of the global community. Multiculturalism includes questions of ethnicity, race, class, gender, language, religion, and sexual orientation. Courses pay attention to the history of multiculturalism; examine the experiences and perspectives of at least three distinct cultural groups; develop a critical perspective about meanings of multiculturalism; and investigate the historical roots of inequalities related to differences in class, ethnicity, gender, age, language, religion, ability, and sexual orientation. Topics of seminars vary and students select a course that interests them. Students can complete only one course numbered LSP 200. Formerly ISP 200.

CSC 208

ETHICS IN TECHNOLOGY

Information Technology and the rapid pace in which it has advanced have had a tremendous impact on our lives. Changes have been swift and the human capacity to deal with them is limited. It has been said that our technology has outpaced our humanity. This course will research the new responsibilities technology presents and our ability to deal with these changes in an ethical manner. Students will employ ethical frameworks, which integrate computer science and ethics, to develop the skills required to examine different sets of assumptions and question them. Case studies will provide a historical perspective for analysis.

IT 228

ETHICS IN COMPUTER GAMES AND CINEMA

Societies function based on normative ethics utilizing commons sense to distinguish between ethical and unethical behavior. Most of us are not aware of the underlying theories when arriving at ethical judgments about right and wrong. However, the fast pace of progress in information technologies and digital entertainment creates an environment, in which ethical challenges are particularly complex. In the eyes of many, games and movies are violent, offensive and immoral. This course will concentrate on analyzing the impact of digital entertainment on an individual and society. Implications of certain values embedded games and movies will be discussed. Elements of the ethical code of conduct for a game or movie creator will be formulated. The issue of balancing individual creativity vs. cultural impact particularly on children will be discussed.

PSY 105

INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY I

Introduction to the history and science of psychology; human development through the life span; learning, memory, thinking, language, and intelligence; personality; social psychology. PSY 105 and PSY 106 will include a research participation requirement of no more than six hours. PSY 105 and PSY 106 may be taken in either order; one is not a prerequisite for the other.

Developer Concentration

First Year Program

Chicago Quarter

Focal Point

Writing

Quantitative Reasoning & Technological Literacy

  • Not Required 

Sophomore Year

Multiculturalism in the US

Junior Year

Experiential Learning

  • Required

Senior Year

Capstone

  • ​Required *

Learning Domains

Arts and Literature (AL)

  • 3 Courses Required

Philosophical Inquiry (PI)

Religious Dimensions (RD)

  • 2 Courses Required

Scientific Inquiry (SI)

  • ​1 SI Lab Course Required

Self, Society and the Modern World (SSMW)

Understanding the Past (UP)

  • 2 Courses Required 
* Students must earn a C- or better in this course.

Note

Courses offered in the student's primary major cannot be taken to fulfill LSP Domain requirements. If students double major, LSP Domain courses may double count for both LSP credit and the second major. Students who choose to take an experiential learning course offered by the major may count it either as a general elective or the JYEL requirement.

In meeting learning domain requirements, no more than one course that is outside the student’s major and is cross-listed with a course within the student’s major, can be applied to count for LSP domain credit. This policy does not apply to those who are pursuing a double major or earning BFA or BM degrees.

LSP 110

DISCOVER CHICAGO

Discover Chicago courses acquaint first-year DePaul students with the metropolitan community, its neighborhoods, cultures, people, institutions, organizations and urban issues. Students also learn about university life, resources, and strategies for how to achieve academically. Learning is accomplished through a variety of means, but particularly through first-hand observation, active participation, personal discovery, and reflection. The course begins with an immersion week one week prior to the official start of the autumn quarter. Classes continue to meet throughout the autumn quarter. Topics for Discover Chicago courses vary and students select one of interest and then investigate the subject using Chicago as a learning lab and site of discovery. First-year students must register for either LSP 110 or LSP 111. Students will receive credit for only one section of LSP 111, Explore Chicago or LSP 110, Discover Chicago. Students who received credit for LSP 111 cannot receive credit for LSP 110. Courses offered during the autumn quarter and available to first-year students only. Formerly ISP 103.

LSP 111

EXPLORE CHICAGO

Explore Chicago courses acquaint first-year DePaul students with the metropolitan community, its neighborhoods, cultures, people, institutions, organizations, and issues. Students also learn about university life, resources, and strategies for how to achive academically. Learning is accomplished through a variety of means, but particularly through lecture, discussion, guest lecturers, first-hand observation, active participation, personal discovery, and reflection. Topics for Explore Chicago courses vary and students select one of interest, and then investigate the subject area using Chicago as a backdrop of inquiry. First-year students must register for either LSP 110 or LSP 111 . Students will receive credit for only one section of LSP 110, (Discover Chicago) or LSP 111, (Explore Chicago). Students who received credit for LSP 110 cannot receive credit for LSP 111. Courses offered during the autumn quarter and available to first-year students only. Formerly ISP 102.

LSP 112

FOCAL POINT SEMINAR

Focal Point Seminars provide first-year DePaul students with the opportunity to learn how to closely examine a single topic, such as: a well-known person, place, event, issue, or text. Students discover the complexity of a subject by studying it from the perspectives of multiple disciplines and different fields of inquiry, and by reading and extensively writing about it. Because the class is a seminar, students also debate the topic through lively class discussions. Topics for Focal Point Seminars vary, and students have the opportunity to select a seminar that piques their curiosity, and connects with intellectual goals and interests. Students will receive credit for only one section of LSP 112, Focal Point Seminar. Courses available to first-year students only. Formerly ISP 101.
Prerequisites:
WRD 103 or HON 100 is a prerequisite for this class.

WRD 103

COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC I

An introduction to the forms, expectations, and conventions of writing at the college level. Emphasis on audience analysis, rhetorical stance, and the nature of the composing process.

WRD 104

COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC II

Developing a convincing argument with information and evidence drawn from a variety of sources. Emphasis on effective research strategies and professional use of sources.

LSP 200

SEMINAR ON MULTICULTURALISM IN THE UNITED STATES

This course provides the opportunity for students to learn about some dimension of multiculturalism relevant to the United States, as considered in the context of the global community. Multiculturalism includes questions of ethnicity, race, class, gender, language, religion, and sexual orientation. Courses pay attention to the history of multiculturalism; examine the experiences and perspectives of at least three distinct cultural groups; develop a critical perspective about meanings of multiculturalism; and investigate the historical roots of inequalities related to differences in class, ethnicity, gender, age, language, religion, ability, and sexual orientation. Topics of seminars vary and students select a course that interests them. Students can complete only one course numbered LSP 200. Formerly ISP 200.

CSC 208

ETHICS IN TECHNOLOGY

Information Technology and the rapid pace in which it has advanced have had a tremendous impact on our lives. Changes have been swift and the human capacity to deal with them is limited. It has been said that our technology has outpaced our humanity. This course will research the new responsibilities technology presents and our ability to deal with these changes in an ethical manner. Students will employ ethical frameworks, which integrate computer science and ethics, to develop the skills required to examine different sets of assumptions and question them. Case studies will provide a historical perspective for analysis.

IT 228

ETHICS IN COMPUTER GAMES AND CINEMA

Societies function based on normative ethics utilizing commons sense to distinguish between ethical and unethical behavior. Most of us are not aware of the underlying theories when arriving at ethical judgments about right and wrong. However, the fast pace of progress in information technologies and digital entertainment creates an environment, in which ethical challenges are particularly complex. In the eyes of many, games and movies are violent, offensive and immoral. This course will concentrate on analyzing the impact of digital entertainment on an individual and society. Implications of certain values embedded games and movies will be discussed. Elements of the ethical code of conduct for a game or movie creator will be formulated. The issue of balancing individual creativity vs. cultural impact particularly on children will be discussed.

PSY 105

INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY I

Introduction to the history and science of psychology; human development through the life span; learning, memory, thinking, language, and intelligence; personality; social psychology. PSY 105 and PSY 106 will include a research participation requirement of no more than six hours. PSY 105 and PSY 106 may be taken in either order; one is not a prerequisite for the other.