Course Requirements

  • 24-32 credit hours of 200/300 level courses in Arabic Language
  • 20-28 credit hours of Allied Courses from at least three different departments

Students who begin their study of Arabic at DePaul with ARB 202 or higher may substitute a 300-level Arabic elective course for any of the required 200-level courses.

Arabic Studies Allied Course List

Anthropology

Art and Architecture, History of

Geography

History

International Studies

Islamic World Studies

Modern Languages

Philosophy

Political Science

Religious Studies

Sociology

Women's and Gender Studies

Open Electives 

Open elective credit also is required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours.​

ARB 202

ADVANCED ARABIC II

Advanced practice in writing and composition, with emphasis on grammatical accuracy, text development skills, and vocabulary expansion.

ANT 240

CULTURES OF THE MIDDLE EAST

Explores the cultures and societies of the contemporary Middle East. Focuses on everyday life and practices, such as religion, social organization, art and popular culture. Uses ethnographic sources to examines the historical influence of various civilizations and religions on contemporary Middle Eastern societies from North Africa to Iran.

ANT 241

WOMEN IN MIDDLE EASTERN SOCIETIES

Explores the experience of women in the Middle East using ethnographic sources from North Africa, the Levant, Arabian Peninsula, Turkey, and Iran. Focuses on the cultural and historical influences on women's lives in this area, and the strategies Middle Eastern women use to negotiate and affect sociocultural change today.

GEO 201

GEOPOLITICS

A survey of theories of geopolitics and international relations, the course explores issues of international security and organization, regional integration, and nationalism, state formation and conflict. Historic geopolitical cases from Europe (Northern Ireland, EU, Balkans), the Middle East and North Africa, and the Russian realm, provide opportunities to assess theoretical approaches and profile the security and foreign policy concerns of the U.S.in the new millennium.

GEO 312

THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA

A basic survey of the physical, cultural, economic, and political geography of the countries of northern Africa and Western Asia. The course traces the human geographical impacts of Arabic, Turkish, and Persian civilizations, as well as the manner in which Islam, nationalism, statehood, and global politics are shaping the region today.

HST 141

THE MUSLIM WORLD, C. 600 CE TO 1100

Foundation of First Global Civilization (600-1100). A study of the emergence of Islam and the growth of the Islamic community from the time of the Prophet Muhammad until the end of the eleventh century. Formerly HST 223.

HST 142

THE MUSLIM WORLD, 1000-1500

Sultans, Khans and Shaykhs: Medieval Islamic History (1000-1500). A survey of Muslim history from the decline of the Arab caliphate to the rise of the great gunpowder empires, addressing themes of political expansion, military slavery, devastation brought about by the twin plagues of the Mongols and the Black Death, and the growth of Islamic mysticism. Formerly HST 224.

HST 143

THE MUSLIM WORLD, 1400-1920

Great Empires (1400-1920). Examines the social, cultural and economic histories of the Ottoman-Turkish, Safavid Iranian and Mughal-Indian empires which dominated the Muslim world in the crucial centuries between the end of the Mongol empire and the advent of European dominance. Formerly HST 225.

HST 226

ISLAM AND THE WEST: A SURVEY OF ORIENTALISM

From "heresy" to "the Green Threat," this course studies the changing perceptions of Islam and the Islamic world held by those in "Western" societies from the time of the Crusades down to the contemporary era.

HST 361

TOPICS IN ISLAMIC HISTORY

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.
Prerequisites:
HST 199 or HST 299 is a prerequisite for this class.

HST 366

THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA

The history of the region since 1800. Topics covered include the end of Ottoman Empire, the impact of European Imperialism and the renewal of Islam.
Prerequisites:
HST 199 or HST 299 is a prerequisite for this class.

INT 310

AFRICAN AREA STUDIES I

A general interdisciplinary survey of the social, political, and economic institutions, and the cultural history of selected regions within the African continent.

INT 311

AFRICAN AREA STUDIES II

A continuation of the survey of institutions and cultural history described in 310.

INT 320

WEST AND SOUTH ASIAN AREA STUDIES I

A general interdisciplinary survey of the social, political, and economic institutions, and the cultural history of selected regions within West or South Asia.

INT 321

WEST AND SOUTH ASIAN AREA STUDIES II

A continuation of the survey of institutions and cultural history described in 320.

IWS 217

ISLAM IN GLOBAL CONTEXTS

A study of Islam's developments in various global contexts, including Arabian beginnings, the Middle East, Central, Eastern and Western Europe, China, the former Soviet States and South Africa, with a focus on the impacts that these cultures and Islam have had on each other. Cross-listed as REL 217.

IWS 263

RELIGION AND POLITICS IN THE MIDDLE EAST

An exploration of Judaism, Christianity and Islam as they develop and interact in the Middle East, historically and in terms of contemporary religious and political issues. Includes a study of personal narratives of people from Jewish, Christian and Muslim communities. Cross-listed as REL 263.

IWS 265

REFORM MOVEMENTS WITHIN ISLAM

This course will deal with the idea of "reform" within Islamic political movements in the modern period. The course will analyze various Islamic reform movements such as the Wahahabis, the Muslim Brotherhood, the Modernists, the Traditionalists, seeking a pattern in these movements. Cross-listed as REL 265.

IWS 271

THE QUR'AN AND ITS INTERPRETERS

A study of the origin, transmission, and interpretation of the Qur'an. Cross listed as REL 271.

IWS 272

MUSLIM WOMEN IN TEXTS

Explores major current approaches to the study of Muslim women, focusing on the Qur'anic conversation on women, on the commentaries provided by men, and on the emerging voices of Muslim women and non-Muslims. Cross-listed as REL 272.

IWS 295

SECTARIAN MOVEMENTS WITHIN ISLAM

This course will look at the various sects within Islam such as Shi'ism, Kharjism, etc. The course will also look at theological sects such as the Mu'taziliets. The course will be concerned with the history, the beliefs, and the present circumstances (if they still exist today) of these sects. Cross listed as REL 295.

IWS 327

MEDIA AND ISLAM

Media and Islam examines the journalistic techniques and communication theories behind how mainstream U.S. news media , print, broadcast and online bring news and information about the Arab and Muslim worlds to the American public. The course pairs media pieces with academic writing to stimulate critical thinking on media coverage of 1) characterizations of Muslims and Islam, including Islamic diversity, 2) contextual links between political Islam and Western/U.S. policies in the Muslim world, 3) the concept of jihad, 4) the status of Muslim women, and 5) the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The course is presented in a three-hour, weekly seminar format and stresses reading, discussion and class participation. Written requirements are a midterm essay (assigned two weeks before due date) and a final media research paper on an approved topic of choice. There are no exams or quizzes.

IWS 330

ISLAMIC LAW, ITS HISTORY AND MODERN APPLICATIONS

This course is a brief introduction to Islamic Law and its history including case studies of its modern applications. Students will trace the history of Islamic legal theory from its beginnings until the modern period. The focus is on the early formation of theory-its major themes and arguments along with the variety of doctrines that contribute to it. Students will examine how the socio-religious realities interface with the production of legal discourse as they build on previous coursework on modern reformers and the sources of law. This course will also explore the ongoing conversations over religious faith as the basis of a legal system. Last, we transition to the contemporary period through case studies where we will consider how the case connects with or departs from these larger debates and the different contemporary methodologies and arguments used.

IWS 340

SPECIAL TOPICS IN ISLAMIC WORLD STUDIES

See schedule for current offerings.

HAA 397

SPECIAL TOPICS/HISTORY OF ART & ARCHITECTURE

Focused study on a specific topic from the history of World art. Formerly ART 397.

MOL 340

ARAB CULTURE

A careful examination of Arab culture within its historical, social, and political context with in-depth analysis of the products and practices of Arab culture. Includes authentic material (video, images, and online resources) and engagement in online and in-class discussions about Arab perspectives that can be derived from these products and practices. This is a hybrid course (meets once per week onsite with students completing the rest of the required hours through online instruction, discussion, and projects). Students will receive instruction and assistance to develop the skills to work with the online portion, which includes using a social network for sharing material and discussion.

MOL 341

MEDIA IN THE ARAB WORLD

The course provides in depth examination of Media in the Arab World as a product of Arab culture. Authentic media items such as television, print, and electronic media will be analyzed within their historical, social, and political context. Major themes in Arab media such as religion, gender roles, social customs, political issues, and historical perspectives will be carefully examined to better understand Arabs, their culture, and the way they think. This is a hybrid course (meets one day onsite with students completing the rest of the required hours through online instruction, discussion, and projects). Students will receive full instruction and assistance to develop the needed skills to work with the online portion, which includes using a social network for sharing material and discussion.

PHL 294

MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY

A study of selected thinkers and issues from the Medieval period.

PSC 255

MIDDLE EAST POLITICS

This course explores contemporary political issues in the Middle East. It includes country profiles, a review of the Arab-Israeli conflict, analysis of opposing viewpoints about the revival of Islam and about Islamic fundamentalism, and the region's position in the emerging new world order.

PSC 349

ADVANCED TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Advanced topics in international relations.

PSC 339

ADVANCED TOPICS IN POLITICAL THOUGHT

Advanced topics in political thought.

PSC 359

ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS

Advanced topics in comparative politics.

REL 217

ISLAM IN GLOBAL CONTEXTS

A study of Islam's developments in various global contexts, including Arabian beginnings, the Middle East, Central, Eastern and Western Europe, China, the former Soviet States and South Africa, with a focus on the impacts that these cultures and Islam have had on each other.

REL 263

RELIGION AND POLITICS IN THE MIDDLE EAST

An exploration of Judaism, Christianity and Islam as they develop and interact in the Middle East, historically and in terms of contemporary religious and political issues. Includes a study of personal narratives of people from Jewish, Christian and Muslim communities.

REL 265

REFORM MOVEMENTS WITHIN ISLAM

This course will deal with the idea of "reform" within Islamic political movements in the modern period. The course will analyze various Islamic reform movements such as the Wahahabis, the Muslim Brotherhood, the Modernists, the Traditionalists, seeking a pattern in these movements. Cross-listed with IWS 265.

REL 271

THE QUR'AN AND ITS INTERPRETERS

A study of the origin, transmission, and interpretation of the Qur'an. Cross-listed with IWS 271.

REL 272

MUSLIM WOMEN IN TEXTS

Explores major current approaches to the study of Muslim women, focusing on the Qur'anic conversation on women, on the commentaries provided by men, and on the emerging voices of Muslim women and non-Muslims. Cross-listed with IWS 272.

REL 295

SECTARIAN MOVEMENTS WITHIN ISLAM

This course will look at the various sects within Islam such as Shi'ism, Kharjism, etc. The course will also look at theological sects such as the Mu'taziliets. The course will be concerned with the history, the beliefs, and the present circumstances (if they still exist today) of these sects. Cross-listed with IWS 295.

SOC 290

SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY

In-depth examination of selected and timely social issues. Topics vary from quarter to quarter. Topics may be initiated by students.

WGS 307

WOMEN IN THE MIDDLE EAST: BEYOND THE VEIL

This course explores how Middle Eastern Women have been represented in the media outside of the Middle East, by Arab women scholars, and "Third World" feminists and challenges these representations by focusing on issues such as veiling, the everyday lives of Middle Eastern Women, political activism, literary works, economics and social class, and media representations.

MOL 342

MODERN ARABIC LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION

Students will learn about the history of Arab literature and selected works of modern writers from different regions in the Arab world. Literature will be examined as a product of Arab culture. In addition to the literary analysis of the works, students will analyze and discuss the cultural practice and perspectives presented in these works taking in consideration the authors' affiliation and background, as well as the historical, social, and political context of the works. This is a hybrid course (meets one day onsite with students completing the rest of the required hours through online instruction, discussion, and projects). Students will receive full instruction and assistance to develop the needed skills to work with the online portion, which includes using a social network for sharing material and discussion.

MOL 297

SPECIAL TOPICS IN MODERN LANGUAGES

See schedule for current offerings.

LSP 111

EXPLORE CHICAGO

Explore Chicago courses acquaint first-year DePaul students with the metropolitan community, its neighborhoods, cultures, people, institutions, organizations, and issues. Students also learn about university life, resources, and strategies for how to achive academically. Learning is accomplished through a variety of means, but particularly through lecture, discussion, guest lecturers, first-hand observation, active participation, personal discovery, and reflection. Topics for Explore Chicago courses vary and students select one of interest, and then investigate the subject area using Chicago as a backdrop of inquiry. First-year students must register for either LSP 110 or LSP 111 . Students will receive credit for only one section of LSP 110, (Discover Chicago) or LSP 111, (Explore Chicago). Students who received credit for LSP 110 cannot receive credit for LSP 111. Courses offered during the autumn quarter and available to first-year students only. Formerly ISP 102.

LSP 112

FOCAL POINT SEMINAR

Focal Point Seminars provide first-year DePaul students with the opportunity to learn how to closely examine a single topic, such as: a well-known person, place, event, issue, or text. Students discover the complexity of a subject by studying it from the perspectives of multiple disciplines and different fields of inquiry, and by reading and extensively writing about it. Because the class is a seminar, students also debate the topic through lively class discussions. Topics for Focal Point Seminars vary, and students have the opportunity to select a seminar that piques their curiosity, and connects with intellectual goals and interests. Students will receive credit for only one section of LSP 112, Focal Point Seminar. Courses available to first-year students only. Formerly ISP 101.
Prerequisites:
WRD 103 or HON 100 is a prerequisite for this class.

LSP 200

SEMINAR ON MULTICULTURALISM IN THE UNITED STATES

This course provides the opportunity for students to learn about some dimension of multiculturalism relevant to the United States, as considered in the context of the global community. Multiculturalism includes questions of ethnicity, race, class, gender, language, religion, and sexual orientation. Courses pay attention to the history of multiculturalism; examine the experiences and perspectives of at least three distinct cultural groups; develop a critical perspective about meanings of multiculturalism; and investigate the historical roots of inequalities related to differences in class, ethnicity, gender, age, language, religion, ability, and sexual orientation. Topics of seminars vary and students select a course that interests them. Students can complete only one course numbered LSP 200. Formerly ISP 200.
Prerequisites:
At least Sophomore Standing is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 222

ISLAMIC ART

This course examines the visual culture of the Islamic world, selectively surveying some of the major artistic developments in regions of the world with a significant Muslim population. It will consider art and architecture as interplay between local culture and Islamic tradition. Topics covered will include the origins of Islamic visual culture in the Arabian Peninsula and the spread of Islamic art and religion across the Middle East. Local expressions of Islamic art may be explored in areas as diverse as North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, Spain, Sicily, Iraq, Iran, India, and Central Asia. Special attention is paid to architecture, painting, and decorative arts. Cross-listed with IWS 251. Formerly ART 251.