The Classical Studies minor offers a basic grounding in Latin or Greek, along with a more in-depth exploration of at least two disciplines focusing on the history, culture, art or religion of the ancient Western world.​

Course Requirements

  • Three quarters of college-level Ancient Greek or Latin (at any level).
  • Five additional courses focusing on Ancient Greece or Rome from at least two different disciplines, chosen in consultation with an advisor or faculty member, from the current approved Classical Studies Allied Course List. For any of these five courses students are strongly encouraged to substitute any intermediate level course in Ancient Greek or Latin.

Classical Studies Allied Course List

Art and Architecture, History of

Comparative Literature

  • CPL 301 EPIC AND ROMANCE (applicable only based on time period discussed, which is not defined in the course description)
  • CPL 302 COMEDY (applicable only based on time period discussed, which is not defined in the course description)
  • CPL 303 TRAGEDY (applicable only based on time period discussed, which is not defined in the course description)

Greek

History

Latin

Modern Languages

Philosophy

Political Science

Religious Studies

Sociology

HAA 230

ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN ART

This course will explore the art of the ancient period (circa 30,000 B.C.E. - 330 C.E.) from a broad range of cultures and styles: from the Paleolithic cave paintings to the Roman Colosseum, from the pyramids of Egypt to the Parthenon in Greece. We will consider how art, religion, urbanism and writing profoundly affected the development of the ancient Mediterranean and Mesopotamian world. We will analyze major stylistic trends and explore the relationship between art, culture, and religion. We will also discuss the role of art in the hands of political leaders and the profound interconnectedness of ancient civilizations. Frequent discussions will analyze controversies in the study of ancient art and scrutinize topics such as gender, power, aesthetics and authenticity. Formerly ART 233.

HAA 231

EARLY MEDIEVAL ART

This course explores the art of the Medieval period from a broad range of cultures: Early Christian, Byzantine, Islamic, Carolingian, and Ottonian. We will discuss major stylistic trends and explore the relationship between art, culture, and religion. Works of art will be evaluated in terms of their social functions in the societies that produced them and our analysis will incorporate the perspectives of both the producers (patrons, artists) and consumers of art. Cross-listed with CTH 253. Formerly ART 240.

HAA 234

BYZANTINE ART

This course will explore the art of the Byzantine Empire from the founding of Constantinople in A.D. 330 to the fall of the city to the Ottomans in 1453. Lectures and readings will primarily focus on how contemporaries understood and interacted with a diverse group of monuments and objects now classified as Byzantine art. Significant attention will be devoted to how works of art functioned in the service of imperial and ecclesiastical ideology. Discussions will analyze how Byzantine art was appreciated and appropriated in both the medieval Mediterranean and in modern scholarship. Crosslisted with CTH 252

HAA 332

ROMANESQUE ART AND ARCHITECTURE

Scholars in the nineteenth century designated Western European monuments, especially architecture and sculpture, created between the eleventh and twelfth centuries, as "Roman-like" in character or "Romanesque," in order to acknowledge certain linkages they perceived between the characteristics of this era's architectural and visual language and that of the distant Roman past. Recent scholarship has emphasized not only large-scale works of art, architecture and sculpture, crucial in an age of Pilgrimage and Crusades, but also small-scale works, such as illuminated manuscripts, metalwork, and coins and seals, as essential for an understanding of medieval visual culture. This class considers the broad spectrum of significant works of art produced during this period from shifting points of view, aesthetic or formalist toward function, agency, presentation and reception.

HAA 376

ROME

Few cities in the world match Rome for its antiquity, imperial heritage, historic, religious and cultural importance, spectacular art and architecture, and rich urban landscape. Traditionally believed to have been founded by Romulus and Remus, descendents of Aeneas, in 753 BCE, and subsequently ruled by Etruscan kings, Rome's public buildings, communal baths, and fortifications suggest that Rome was urbanized as early as the 6C BCE. After the expulsion of their Etruscan monarchs, Romans established the Republic, which evolved into the Roman Empire when Octavian, grand nephew of Julius Caesar, became Augustus, Rome's first emperor, princeps or first citizen. Along with subsequent emperors determined to turn Rome into a magnificent city worthy to be the capital of a great empire, Augustus used architecture and the built environment as massive symbols of power, authority, and legitimacy, a lesson in public education embraced by the Catholic Church when the imperial pagan capital became the capital of Western Christendom and the seat of the papacy. This class explores the city of Rome from its ancient origins through the 17th century and focuses on the major art and architectural developments that define this unique urban space.

HAA 397

SPECIAL TOPICS/HISTORY OF ART & ARCHITECTURE

Focused study on a specific topic from the history of World art. Formerly ART 397.

CPL 301

EPIC AND ROMANCE

Study of examples of heroic literature from a variety of cultures, including Western and non-Western civilizations.

CPL 302

COMEDY

Study of important examples of dramatic comedy; selections may range from ancient times to the present day with some attention to the relevant theories of comedy (Aristotle, Freud, Bergson, Frye, etc.).

CPL 303

TRAGEDY

Study of important examples of dramatic tragedy; selections may range from ancient times to the present day with some attention to the relevant theories of tragedy.

GRK 101

BASIC CLASSICAL GREEK I

Basic Classical Greek is the first Greek translation course. GRK 101 introduces students to the basics of the language of the Athenians, which includes the Greek alphabet, pronunciation, accentuation and the beginnings of Greek grammar.

GRK 102

BASIC CLASSICAL GREEK II

Basic Classical Greek II is the second Greek translation course. GRK 102 is a continuation of the introduction to grammar with an emphasis on reading skills through vocabulary development and composition.

GRK 103

BASIC CLASSICAL GREEK III

Basic Classical Greek III is the third Greek translation course. GRK 103 pays special attention to reading Greek texts in conjunction with composition and English translations for an appreciation of accurate rendering and structural divergence.

GRK 104

INTERMEDIATE CLASSICAL GREEK I

Intermediate Classical Greek I is the fourth Greek translation course. GRK 104 is a translation course for students who have completed GRK 101-102-103 (or the equivalent), concentrating on grammar and understanding how Greek grammar and idiom function. Students continue to expand their vocabulary skills. Student interest determines some of the content.

GRK 105

INTERMEDIATE CLASSICAL GREEK II

Intermediate Classical Greek II is the fifth Greek translation course. GRK 105 is a translation course for students who have completed GRK 101-102-103, concentrating on grammar and understanding how Greek grammar and idiom function. Students learn forms of irregular verbs. Student interest determines some of the content.

GRK 106

INTERMEDIATE CLASSICAL GREEK III

Intermediate Classical Greek III is a translation course for students who have completed GRK 101-102-103, concentrating on grammar and understanding how Greek grammar and idiom function. Some composition accompanies translation. Student interest determines some of the content.

GRK 197

SPECIAL TOPICS IN GREEK

See schedule for current offerings.

GRK 297

SPECIAL TOPICS IN GREEK

See schedule for current offerings.

GRK 397

SPECIAL TOPICS IN GREEK

See schedule for current offerings.

GRK 497

SPECIAL TOPICS IN GREEK

See schedule for current offerings.

HST 237

HISTORY OF THE CITY OF ROME

Topics in the history of urban Rome from antiquity through the modern age.

HST 253

HISTORY OF THE MODERN OLYMPICS

This course will examine the Modern Olympics: the oldest and most inclusive institutionalized effort to engender international exchange and perpetuate peacefulness through athletic excellence. Relying on a mix of primary and secondary sources, the course will touch on an array of important issues, including globalization, race relations, gender issues, the rise of popular culture, and terrorism.

HST 285

ANCIENT ROME: AUGUSTUS TO CONSTANTINE

This course examines the history of the Roman Empire from its beginnings under Augustus (27 BCE-14 CE) to its reorganization under Diocletian (284-305 CE) and Constantine (306-337 CE). Both textual and archaeological sources will be used to understand political, economic, and social developments.

HST 294

ANCIENT GREECE

Traces the development of Greek civilization through an examination of material culture. Emphasis will be on the major monuments and artifacts of the Greek world from prehistory to the Classical Age. Students will also be introduced to techniques and methods of classical archaeology.

HST 296

ANCIENT ROME: ORIGINS TO THE END OF THE REPUBLIC

This course traces the development of Rome from a small settlement on the banks of the Tiber in the eighth century BCE to a Mediterranean power in the first century BCE. Both textual and archaeological sources will be used to understand political, economic, and social institutions of the Archaic and Republican periods.

LAT 101

BASIC LATIN I

Basic Latin I is the first Latin translation course. This course introduces students to the basics of the language of the Romans, which includes the Latin alphabet, pronunciation, the beginnings of Latin grammar and Latin composition.

LAT 102

BASIC LATIN II

Basic Latin II is the second Latin translation course. Students continue LAT 101 by completing their introduction to Latin grammar. Emphasis is on morphology, complex syntax, English to Latin composition, Latin dictation, reading and translation of longer sections of Latin prose.

A&S 491

EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP OF SCHOOLS

This course introduces students to the research base of organizational theory, the politics of education, and foundations of building level instructional leadership. Multiple theories are examined in light of the students? experience in educational settings. This examination of theory in light of experience provides the students with a framework for analyzing both familiar educational institutions and the theories that support educational institutions. Through a study of administrative and organizational theory using those settings with which students are most familiar, students will become more reflective of the theoretical base that will inform their future practice as administrators.
Prerequisites:
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

LAT 103

BASIC LATIN III

Basic Latin III is the third Latin translation course. Students continue LAT 102 and refine their knowledge of Latin empirically by reading extended passages from selected classical Latin authors. Emphasis is on morphology, review of syntax and prosody.

LAT 113

LATIN FOR READING IV: INTRODUCTION TO LATIN POETRY

Latin for Reading IV (Introduction to Latin Poetry) is the fourth Latin translation course. Students concentrate on translation of classical Latin poetic authors, together with a grammatical review, attention is given to prosody and metrics.

LAT 114

LATIN FOR READING V: INTRODUCTION TO LATIN PROSE

Latin for Reading V (Introduction to Latin Prose) is the fifth Latin translation course. Students concentrate on translating classical Latin prose authors, together with a grammatical review, attention to prosody and rhetorical figures.

LAT 115

LATIN FOR READING VI: LATIN PROSE COMPOSITION

Latin for Reading VI (Introduction to Latin Composition) is the sixth Latin translation course. Latin to English translation of selected Latin prose authors is balanced with English to Latin translation. Attention to style, idiom and rhetorical figures as a means toward further mastery of Latin reading skills.

LAT 197

SPECIAL TOPICS IN LATIN

See schedule for current offerings.

LAT 297

SPECIAL TOPICS IN LATIN

See schedule for current offerings.

LAT 397

SPECIAL TOPICS IN LATIN

See schedule for current offerings.

LAT 497

SPECIAL TOPICS IN LATIN

See schedule for current offerings. Graduate standing required.

MOL 210

CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY

Classical Mythology is an interdisciplinary blend of the classical traditions of myth and literature, concentrating on myth. It endeavors to place Classical myths into their historical, social and cultural contexts. Students will learn significant myths and the names and functions of the most important characters in them along with primary myth theories.

MOL 211

HEROES AND EPICS

Heroes and Epics is a literature course is centered around Homer's Iliad and Odyssey and Vergil's Aeneid; it endeavors to place these epic poems into their geographical, historical, social, and cultural contexts. Students will learn the definition of Epic as a literary genre and discover how this genre evolved, through ancient Greek oral tradition, to reflect audiences and times.

MOL 212

CLASSICAL TRAGEDY

Classical Tragedy is a literature course that introduces students to the authors, social contexts and performances of ancient Greek drama. Students will learn how to interpret the "myth" presented on the ancient Greek stage, and how to apply what they have learned to detect and interpret the moral, social and political issues raised in this timeless, yet keenly particular, literature.

MOL 213

ANCIENT GREEK AND ROMAN COMEDY

Ancient Greek and Roman Comedy. Selected landmarks of Greek and Roman satirical literature. Students learn mportant theories of interpretation, theories of humor as well as secondary interpretive opinions about ancient Comedy. This course endeavors to train intelligent critics of modern satire.

MOL 214

THE CLASSICAL FEMININE

Close reading of translations of ancient Greek, Latin, and Semitic texts that pertain to or are written by women. We will investigate the nature and the roles of the "feminine" in Antiquity, studying the day-to-day lives of women, with emphasis on the textile arts that comprised their primary daily activity. Although students will visit these texts through English renderings, the course will yield a lively sense of the ancient languages in which they were written -- and, thereby, the living conversations with which women of these time-honored cultures expressed, and wove, themselves.

PHL 293

ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

A study of selected thinkers and issues from ancient Greece.

PHL 294

MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY

A study of selected thinkers and issues from the Medieval period.

PHL 360

GREEK PHILOSOPHY

PHL 361

PLATO

PHL 362

ARISTOTLE

PHL 381

DRAMATIC THEORY: TRAGEDY

A study of some of the main philosophical theories of tragedy together with readings of some of the most important ancient and modern tragedies. Cross-listed with THE 224.

PHL 382

DRAMATIC THEORY: COMEDY

A study of some of the main philosophical theories of comedy together with readings of some of the most important ancient and modern comedies. Cross-listed with THE 225.

PHL 383

PHILOSOPHICAL THEMES IN LITERATURE

An investigation of philosophical topics as they appear in fiction, drama, and poetry.

PSC 230

CLASSICAL POLITICAL THOUGHT

Political thought of the ancient, medieval and early modern period including Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, St. Thomas, and Machiavelli.

PSC 231

MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

Political thought of the modern period including Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hume, Burke, Mill, and Marx.

PSC 239

TOPICS IN POLITICAL THOUGHT

Variable topics.

REL 213

CHRISTIAN THOUGHT IN CLASSICAL AND MEDIEVAL TIMES

A study of the development of Christian theologies in Western civilization from post-New Testament times to the Renaissance, with emphasis on St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas.

REL 236

VARIETIES OF JUDAISM IN THE GREEK AND ROMAN WORLD

An examination of Judaism from the Jews' return from Babylonian exile in 538 BCE to the promulgation of the Mishnah in 200 CE, with a focus on the Roman period. The Dead Sea Scrolls, as well as concepts of the Messiah, the resurrection of the dead, the final judgment and the idea of the "Bible" will be studied.

SOC 254

ANCIENT GREECE AND ROME

The course explores the society and culture of ancient Greece and Rome, including mythology, art, and social institutions. The impact of these cultures on contemporary popular culture and social thought is considered. Emphasis on primary materials.