The Community Service Studies (CSS) Minor is a multidisciplinary program that provides a framework for understanding and engaging in critical social issues at the level of community. While the notion of community is increasingly complex, the program explores the nuances of community as defined through the lens of groups with common affiliation, identity, or grievance that may be geographically or non-geographically based. The curriculum relies heavily on community-based service learning courses and is designed to provide students with a foundation of analytical, reflective, interpersonal, and leadership skills. Through supporting university partnerships with Chicago-area community-based organizations, students gain a local perspective on social justice issues, including those built on race, class, and gender inequalities and other forms of social, economic and political exclusion. 

The practice of service is often shaped by particular economic and cultural circumstances related to power, privilege, and identity. A central component of CSS is the importance of viewing communities through an asset lens and thus working to support existing community strengths rather than responding to needs. Students minoring in CSS therefore develop strong critical self-reflection skills that guide them as future leaders in making ethical and socially responsible decisions.   

Course Requirements

Approved Electives

Courses with an asterisk (*) are EL-CbSL courses

Study Abroad Courses

Several Study Aboard experiences may be used to fulfill one or more course requirements for the Minor. Approval of these trips for the Minor must be obtained in consultation with the Director.

CSS 201

PERSPECTIVES ON COMMUNITY SERVICE

This course explores the relationship between social justice movements and non-profit organizations in the U.S. by providing a structure within which students can learn about issues and theory and the organizational settings in which they are serving.

CSS 300

INTRODUCTION TO NON-PROFIT MANAGEMENT

This course provides students with an understanding of the functioning of the organizations that conduct the vital work of the non-profit sector. Students will complete the course with the knowledge base to be effective program managers and board members in these organizations.

CSS 395

COMMUNITY INTERNSHIP

Community Internship exposes students to career potentials in non-profit and government agencies through an intensive internship experience in a community organization.

ART 383

SERVICE LEARNING IN THE ARTS INTERNSHIP

This course seeks to expose the student to the workings of a professional artist or art historian in order for the student to both gain professional experience in the concentration area of their degree and to be of service to a community group that can use the student's help. Students will be assigned an internship in consultation with the instructor and meet several times during the quarter to reflect on their service experience with other interns.

ANT 322

COMMUNITY-BASED APPLIED PRACTICE

This laboratory course in the applied anthropology sequence introduces students to the range of anthropological practice in the public and not-for-profit sector. Students will earn about the ways that anthropology has been and can be applied to initiate practical change in communities. In addition to learning the professional and ethical responsibilities of practicing anthropologists, students will also gain a practical experience working on an applied project. Human Subjects Research certification is required for this class.
Prerequisites:
ANT 201, ANT 203 and senior standing are a prerequisite for this class.

CTH 247

ROMAN CATHOLIC SOCIAL THOUGHT IN CONTEXT

A study of Roman Catholicism's understanding of its relation to the social world, including such matters as the relation between Church and state, and the moral authority of the Church, and of its teaching on such issues as social ethics, politics and economics. Cross-listed with REL 283.

CTH 248

CONTEMPORARY MORAL ISSUES

A study of the relations between religious beliefs and moral action to be carried out through an examination of the ethical and moral response of Catholicism to selected moral issues such as war and peace, sexual behavior, etc.

CTH 282

GOD, JUSTICE AND REDEMPTIVE ACTION

A practicum and seminar combining student participation in social outreach programs with an examination of the theological and ethical issues raised therein. Students will volunteer at a field site for the quarter.

CTH 290

THE LIFE AND TIMES OF VINCENT DE PAUL

A study of Vincent de Paul in his cultural and religious context.

CTH 293

THE DAUGHTERS OF CHARITY

An historical study of the Daughters of Charity from their foundation to the present.

CTH 341

LIBERATION THEOLOGY: THEORY AND PRACTICE

Focuses upon the ideas and practices of a radical movement for the transformation of Christianity and for social justice that originated in the "Basic Christian Communities" of Latin America and spread from there to North America and the Third World. Cross-listed as REL 351.

CTH 351

NATURAL LAW AND CHRISTIAN ETHICS

A study of the relevance of some Western and non-Western Natural Law traditions in view of arriving at a vision of a universal common good that can generate a Christian ethical discourse capable of intercultural and interreligious communication. (Taught at Catholic Theological Union.)

CTH 354

SPECIAL TOPICS IN CATHOLIC THOUGHT

Special topics in Catholic Thought; see schedule for current offerings.

CTH 386

THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN WORLD POLITICS

Catholicism as it affects (and is affected by) world politics. Various topics might include war and peace, global economy, immigration, nationalism, etc. Cross-listed with PSC 345.

CTH 389

SPECIAL TOPICS IN THE SOCIAL DIMENSION OF CATHOLICISM

SPECIAL TOPICS IN THE SOCIAL DIMENSION OF CATHOLICISM

INTC 205

COMMUNICATION, CULTURE AND COMMUNITY

Examines the relationships among culture, communication, institutions, and public and private life. Students explore the possibilities and problems of contemporary forms of community through service in community organizations. The course also fulfills the junior year experiential learning requirement through community based service learning. (Formerly CMNS 205)

INTC 323

SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

This course examines the rhetoric of social movements throughout American History. As a rhetoric class, the focus is primarily on the symbolic creation of movements in order to provide background of the political and social events that gave rise to the movement. Using readings from a variety of sources, we will investigate the discursive construction of power as it relates to society and politics. The class will take a case-study approach to examining social movement rhetoric, exploring the discourse that has served to resist oppressive, or perceptively oppressive, systems. (Formerly CMN 323)

INTC 361

GENDER AND COMMUNICATION

A review of the differences in communication patterns between women and men. Topics covered include language and language usage differences, interaction patterns, gender social movements, and perceptions of the sexes generated through language and communication. (Formerly CMNS 361)

JOUR 374

COMMUNITY JOURNALISM

Students will examine the work of major news chains that have begun experimenting with local coverage patterns that are informed by community leaders and community organizations identifying what matters in their community. Supporters of this approach claim it is the future for news organizations attempting to fulfill their social responsibility. Critics claim it undermines the independence of the press.
Prerequisites:
JOUR 275 is a prerequisite for this class.

CSS 101

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TEACHING AND REFLECTION

CCS 101 is a mandatory year-long course sequence for all students serving as tutors at San Miguel schools and Visitation Catholic Elementary through the Stean's Center Catholic Schools Initiative. Utilizing the pastoral cycle of "See, Judge, and Act" within the Catholic Social tradition, students will critically reflect on their tutoring experience as it relates to local economic, cultural and political issues surrounding the Englewood and Back of the Yards neighborhoods. In addition they will explore a variety of domestic and global justice issues through the lens of Catholic Social Teaching. Through this hermeneutic, they will gain a familiarity with terms and concepts to more thoroughly analyze and critique social systems. The students will also learn more about the Dominican and LaSallian charism towards marginalized populations and reflect on their own personal responsibility as members of a community bound to their religious mission. As a service-enhanced course, students will actively engage in critical reflection and dialogue on their tutoring experience through the use of readings, videos, guest speakers, group projects/presentations, and designated field trips to related organizations. Variable credit.

CSS 399

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Independent study. Enrollment by instructor and/or with approval by program director. Variable credit.

WRD 377

WRITING AND SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT

Using writing within community service. See schedule for current offerings.

HON 351

HONORS SENIOR SEMINAR IN SERVICE LEARNING

This senior seminar, which meets the capstone requirement for the Honors Program, brings students into the community as they develop skills for lifelong learning. Students in this course explore theories of service and the relationship between altruism and activism as they consider the role that service will play in their lives after DePaul. Outside of class, students will devote a minimum of three hours each week to service work at one of the sites offered through the course. This course also meets the university's Experiential Learning requirement for students who have not yet fulfilled this requirement. Open only to students in the University Honors Program.
Prerequisites:
Membership in the University Honors Program is a prerequisite for this class.

LST 202

CONSTRUCTING LATINO COMMUNITIES

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to Latino Studies. It explores the socio-historical background of the major Latino groups in the United States, and the economic, political, and cultural factors that converge to shape Latino group identity. This course examines contemporary issues affecting Latinos including the evolution of Latino ethnicity, immigration, transnationalism and the formation of Latino communities, activism, and media representations of Latinos.

LST 306

LATINO COMMUNITIES IN CHICAGO

This course studies Latino Communities, focusing on their cultural and historical constructions from a community based learning experience.

LST 307

GROWING UP LATINO/LATINA IN THE U.S.

A critical as well as a community based examination of the experiences of growing up as a Latino/Latina person in the United States.

LST 308

MOTHERHOOD IN LATINO COMMUNITIES

This is an intellectual, as well as a community based exploration of motherhood in Latino communities and the theories of motherhood in feminist criticism throughout Latin America. Other topics: fatherhood, the extended family and the community as family.

PAX 200

PERSPECTIVES ON PEACE, JUSTICE , AND CONFLICT STUDIES

A survey of key issues in the study of violence, conflict and its peaceful resolution including an examination of nonviolence as a philosophy and as a technique of action and social change. The course treats aggression, oppression, and nationalism as particularly problematic in an increasingly global human community. The course introduces key concepts in peace studies (positive and negative peace, structural and direct violence, the analysis of conflict) and demonstrates the links with other parallel concerns (minority issues, women's issues, social change, international relations). In addition to traditional methods of instruction, this course will rely on students working at designated community service organizations which will be treated as one of the central learning resources in the course.

PSC 214

POLITICS AND MULTICULTURALISM

This course examines the theoretical and practical dilemmas facing multicultural societies, with special emphasis on the United States. Special attention is paid to questions of identity, integration, and separatism.

PSC 218

AFRICAN-AMERICAN POLITICS

This course discusses the nature and scope of African-American politics. Major topics include the radical, liberal, moderate and conservative wings of African-American political discourse, the civil rights movement and its aftermath, the rise of African-American mayors, and presidential politics. An historical survey of African-American politics, and the factors that have shaped them, may also be included.

PSC 223

URBAN POLITICS

Communities running the gamut from small towns through urban neighborhoods to big cities are examined with reference to their structures of government, systems of political influence, and public policy issues.

PSC 282

POLITICAL ACTION AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

This course combines community-based service learning with readings, lectures and classroom discussions to investigate the nature of social justice and the extent to which individual and community political action can promote it. (Please note that the catalog number for this course was changed from PSC 396 to PSC 282 effective Autumn, 2001.)

PSC 286

CAMPAIGNS AND SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT

This course examines political campaigns and participation in the United States, the role of civic engagement in a representative and democratic political system, and the ethics of political campaigns. Students engage in an experiential project including participation in a political organization.

PSC 324

INEQUALITY IN AMERICAN SOCIETY

This course examines the nature and extent of inequality in American society and explores various psychological, political, social, and economic theories which attempt to explain the existence of this phenomenon.

PSC 345

THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN WORLD POLITICS

This course seeks to familiarize students with major theories, research traditions, and issues regarding the role of Catholicism in the contemporary world. It will assess the role of various levels and actors with the Church--the Vatican, priests and nuns, lay groups and movements, activists, and others--in working as forces of social change/stability in matters of world politics, economics, and culture. The course will also consider the impact of globalization and other transnational processes on the activities and options of Catholic institutions and actors.

PSC 347

ETHICS IN WORLD POLITICS

Drawing on general theories of international relations and historical cases, this course examines both the forces that inhibit the development and effectiveness of ethical norms at the international level and the conditions under which such norms develop and affect the behavior of states and other actors.

PSC 362

THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

An overview of the important features of the American criminal justice system, including the role of police, courts and corrections. The course analyzes conventional and alternative definitions of crime and explanations for criminal behavior. An examination of race and class issues as they relate to criminal justice, and their implications for public policy, is also included.

PSY 220

LATINA/O PSYCHOLOGY

The purpose of this course is to examine the psychological research literature on the mental health and well being of Latina/o populations in the United States. A number of relevant topics will be examined, including the current state of Latinas/os in psychology, cultural characteristics and values, immigration, acculturation, ethnic identity, stereotypes and discrimination, health, and education. The goal of this course is for students to be better equipped in understanding the factors that influence the psychology of the Latina/o population.

PSY 305

PSYCHOLOGY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

This course is designed to provide students with both in-class and applied experience within the field of psychology, including an overview of psychology as an academic discipline. Offered every quarter.
Prerequisites:
PSY 105 or 106 is a prerequisite for this class.

PSY 306

SERVICE LEARNING

This course is designed to provide students with both in-class and applied experience in a specific area of psychology. Course focuses on one particular topic per term, such as Mental Health Problems in Contemporary Society, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, etc. Check course schedule for current offerings.
Prerequisites:
PSY 105 or 106 is a prerequisite for this class.

PPS 331

ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a historical background on environmental justice (EJ) in the US and an understanding of the current EJ movement. Policy debates surrounding EJ are highlighted from recent studies on determining 'disproportionate impact' to local EJ communities. In addition, students will experience the challenges of EJ organizations in Chicago through the service-based leaning component of the course. Twenty-five hours of service learning is required for completion of this course.

IWS 104

RELIGIONS IN CHICAGO

An experience-centered introduction to the varieties of religious thought and expression manifest in the greater Chicago area. Includes site visits.

REL 222

CONTEMPORARY MORAL ISSUES

A study of the relations between religious beliefs and moral action to be carried out through an examination of the ethical and moral response of various religious traditions to selected moral issues such as war and peace, sexual behavior, etc.

REL 259

RELIGION AND SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT

An investigation of the ways in which various religious traditions engage the social order. Traditions, persons and movements that form the focus of the course will vary from section to section. The course will integrate theory and practice in studying forms of religious engagement. All students will perform some service to a community or within a community organization or agency.
Prerequisites:
Sophomore standing is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 491

EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP OF SCHOOLS

This course introduces students to the research base of organizational theory, the politics of education, and foundations of building level instructional leadership. Multiple theories are examined in light of the students? experience in educational settings. This examination of theory in light of experience provides the students with a framework for analyzing both familiar educational institutions and the theories that support educational institutions. Through a study of administrative and organizational theory using those settings with which students are most familiar, students will become more reflective of the theoretical base that will inform their future practice as administrators.
Prerequisites:
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

REL 283

ROMAN CATHOLIC SOCIAL THOUGHT IN CONTEXT

A study of Roman Catholicism's understanding of its relation to the social world, including such matters as the relation between Church and State, the moral authority of the Church, and of its teaching on such issues as social ethics, politics and economics.

REL 322

FEMINIST ETHICS

An investigation of theoretical issues regarding women's moral experiences and of feminist ethical arguments combatting various forms of oppression. Cross-listed with WGS 310/410 and MLS 477.

REL 351

LIBERATION THEOLOGY

Focuses upon the ideas and practices of a radical movement for the transformation of Christianity and for social justice that originated in the "Basic Christian Communities" of Latin America and spread from there to North America and the Third World. Entails either an Applied Research or Service Learning component.

SOC 200

SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL WELFARE

The nature of social work with a focus on the delivery of a variety of human services like health care and welfare; emphasis on professional-client relationships; examination of government agencies and voluntary associations.

SOC 212

COMMUNITY AND SOCIETY

An analysis of neighborhoods, cities, suburbs and utopian communities; the examination of major trends in urbanization and the evaluation of urban and community policies.

SOC 230

SEX AND GENDER IN THE CITY

Examines the role of sex, sexuality, and gender in urban life, their interaction in urban spaces, and the formation of related private and public social policies.

SOC 231

RACE AND ETHNICITY IN THE CITY

The social and cultural importance of urban ethnic communities and their interrelationships are investigated through a study of neighborhood development and change. Special emphasis on the major ethnic communities of Chicago.

SOC 248

WHITE RACISM

This seminar is an introduction to white studies and white racism. White racism is a set of socially organized attitudes, behaviors and beliefs about differences between Blacks and other groups of color in the United States. The focus is on how the color White is constituted as dominant in social life throughout the United States and Western Europe.

SOC 340

SOCIAL INEQUALITY

Examination of inequalities in wealth and power and their consequences for individuals and the society; for example, the institutions of law, health care, education and politics.

SOC 398

INTERNSHIP

Placement of students in work-study situations relevant to careers in health and human services, social work, juvenile justice, law and society, urban and community services. Clinical and Experiential (can fulfill jr. yr. requirement). (1 to 4 credit hours).

SPN 124

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH l: SERVICE LEARNING

Intensive practice in the use of Spanish through listening, speaking, reading and writing, and continued enhancement of the cultural awareness intrinsic to those skills. Provides Experiential Learning credit through Community Based Service Learning: includes at least 25 hours of required work off-campus.

SPN 125

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II: SERVICE LEARNING

Continuing practice in spoken and written Spanish and further development of reading and listening abilities in an authentic cultural context. Provides Experiential Learning credit through Community Based Service Learning: includes at least 25 hours of required work off-campus.

SPN 126

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH III: SERVICE LEARNING

Developing more fluency in speaking, understanding, reading and writing Spanish with a concomitant heightened awareness of the cultural dimensions of the Spanish language. Provides Experiential Learning credit through Community Based Service Learning: includes at least 25 hours of required work off-campus.

WGS 300

FEMINIST THEORIES

Disagreements about what counts as feminist theory have raged as the borders of feminist discourse have shifted over the past two and a half decades. Yet most feminists continue to insist that sex/gender be considered basic categories of analysis and theory. Broadly conceived, feminist theory--historical or contemporary--represents an attempt to understand and interpret the roots and causes of women's place in the world. This course examines how different theoretical perspectives address gender, class, racial, and sexual inequalities and the method(s) proposed for social change. Students will be required to critically engage these theories in terms of how they address the commonalities and differences among women, especially insofar as these are grounded in race, class, and sexual identifications and dissonances. This course is a core requirement for the Women's & Gender Studies major.
Prerequisites:
WMS 250 is a prerequisite for this class.

WGS 303

GENDER, VIOLENCE AND RESISTANCE

This course explores the social and cultural contexts of interpersonal violence in women's lives, with a focus on domestic violence, rape, harassment. The course seeks to understand how gender, race, class, sexuality, and national differences and inequalities shape the experiences of violence, the social and institutional responses to violence, and strategies for resistance and change.

WGS 387

TEEN VIOLENCE PREVENTION

This course is an interdisciplinary experiential/service learning seminar in which students will participate in, and critically reflect upon, a relationship violence prevention program in Chicago area high schools. This class will explore adolescent development, considering the ways in which economic, social, political and cultural contexts influence that development. In addition, we will focus on adolescent relationships, group work with teens, aggression and violence in intimate -- in particular teen -- relationships, and evaluation of programs to prevent teen violence. Each week students will address a set of theoretical and/or practical themes that in some way relate to teen violence and aggression, as well as prevention of such violence. Discussions of each theme will draw on course readings, lecture materials, and perhaps most importantly, students' experiences working with teens in schools.

WGS 394

WOMEN, SELF, AND SOCIETY SEMINAR

Women, Self and Society Seminar (cross-listed as Women's and Gender Studies 480 and Master's of Liberal Studies 468). Variable Topics. See course schedule for current offerings.

ART 291

MURAL PAINTING

This class has a central focus on the art of mural making. Students will have a hands on experience as they design and execute a mural at a predetermined site. The students will also learn the strategy and design factors of planning a mural piece of their own. This piece will be at a real venue, executed as a small scale illustration brd. piece. This will be done in the classroom in the last part of the qtr. The class functions as a studio class as it meets for 6 hrs. weekly. A minimum of 25 service hours is required. And having either drawing or painting experience on the collegiate level is recommended highly for this class. This class is certified for cbSL and JYEL credit.

ABD 275

BLACK FEMINIST THEORIES IN A U.S. CONTEXT

This course surveys the major figures, statements, and movements that shape Black feminist thinking, writing and activism in the United States. Figures examined include: bell hooks, Ida B. Wells Barnett, Mary Church Terrell, Angela Davis, Michelle Wallace, Audre Lorde, and Mark Anthony Neal, among others. Cross-listed with WGS 275.

ART 382

INTEGRATING ART INTO THE CURRICULUM AND THE COMMUNITY

This course brings DePaul students into a Chicago grade school to incorporate art into the curriculum. It is a hybrid course that involves some Independent Study in which the students organize their schedule in conjunction with a grade school classroom teacher, and some required classes that they must attend on campus at a prescribed time and day. Students are off campus for approximately 10 class sessions. At the start of the quarter, students are given a theoretical background in community-based art education, ethical issues, and social engagement. Working in teams, students will observe in the classrooms to gain a sense of the grade school community and the existing curriculum. DePaul students will then develop and teach a specific lesson plan in collaboration with the classroom teacher. The objective will be to produce a creative learning experience that co-mingles art and a core subject such as science or social studies. Teaching this art integrated lesson will be an essential aspect of the learning experience. Students will meet back at the DePaul classroom at designated intervals for information, reflection, and the analysis of their experience and their impact on the grade school community, in relations to the theoretical examples from the beginning of the course. These reflections take varied forms: discussion, role-playing exercise, presentation, and papers. Approved for JYEL and cbSL credit. Formerly ART 283.

ART 292

COMMUNITY VIDEO PRODUCTION

The heavy emphasis on experiential learning of this course will combine classroom instruction on documentary video production with student fieldwork. Over the course of the term, students will plan, produce and substantially complete a videotape project for a community client. Through the production of a video project specifically designed for a community organization, students will be able to practice production techniques that they learn in the classroom while gaining insight about how video can bring attention to community needs and thus make an impact on communities (outside the classroom). Our goal for this course is to bring students to the point of understanding and mastering the technical elements of video production and understanding these processes within an experiential and service learning context, such that through working on documentary projects, students will come to a point of understanding the history and contemporary needs of a particular community group and how the creation of a finished video can address some of those needs. Students will work to produce projects that are thoughtful, important and technically polished. This class is certified for cbSL and JYEL credit.

CSS 310

RESTORATIVE JUSTICE: ENGAGEMENT WITH THE PRISON

This course will provide an opportunity for students to 1.) reflect deeply on the meaning of justice, 2.) examine institutionalized forms of justice, and, above all, 3.) explore alternative models of justice. Using a dialectic process, students will actively scrutinize theories of justice and investigate issues and movements of social justice. Additionally, they will be asked to consider how each of these areas informs the other, since theories often influence as well as emerge from issues and movements. Assumptions about crime and justice will be considered by comparing and contrasting retributive and restorative paradigms. The role of offender, victim and community will be analyzed in the context of crime and justice. Students will also look into programs in restorative justice to discern their outcome effectiveness.

CSS 320

COMMUNITY FOOD SYSTEMS

This course offers a critical analysis of the concept of community food systems as it has been employed as an alternative to the global agro-food system. Readings, lectures, films, guest speakers, site visits, and field projects will provide students with an overview of emerging community-driven efforts at producing, distributing and consuming food. Emphasis will be placed on (1) local, community-based food projects within urban contexts in North America; (2) whether or not these projects constitute more environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable approaches to provisioning households, neighborhoods, towns and cities; and (3) the degree to which such projects enhance the control over, accessibility to, and healthiness of food. Students will gain an understanding of the current global food system in relation to producing, processing, packaging, transporting, marketing, eventually discarding of food. Comparisons will be drawn with emerging local production, distribution and procurement processes driven by the interests of community groups and organizations concerned with health and nutrition, the environment and social justice. There will be a specific focus on the application of community food systems in urban sectors where access to fresh food is challenged, for example, as a result of historical patterns of racial segregation and social exclusion. Students will gain an understanding of such challenges through engaging in field projects in support of local food production and distribution within Chicago communities.

ENV 245

URBAN AND COMMUNITY AGRICULTURE

This course will acquaint students with the challenges, opportunities, practices, and transformative potential of urban agriculture. Taking an interdisciplinary, case-study approach, this course will explore issues such as food security, community gardening, farmers markets, the locavore food movement, entrepreneurial aspects of urban agriculture, methods of urban food production, and food consumption patterns. The course will meet in the classroom and on-site at the DePaul urban farm and greenhouses. In addition, students are expected to spend several hours each week outside of class time engaged in hands-on experience in urban farming at DePaul or at local sites arranged with the instructor.

PAX 212

SOCIAL JUSTICE AND SOCIAL CHANGE

An exploration of the mutual interdependence of social justice and non-violence, understanding it as a strategy for social change and a vision for social concord. Formerly PAX 230.

PAX 220

ACTIVISM

This course will look at the various ways in which people across the globe organize to fight for better living conditions, social justice, human rights, environmental protection, labor issues, sustainable development alternatives, political representation, and gender issues, among others.

PAX 231

ANALYZING POVERTY, ITS CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES

This course investigates a variety of viewpoints on the causes and effects of poverty. Poverty is a complex and multidimensional condition often difficult to measure, comprehend and change. It includes lack of or limited access to material needs (food, water, shelter, health care, etc.), social relations (participation, inclusion, rights, etc.), income and wealth (unemployment, resources, etc.) and moral, psychological, or spiritual well-being. This course reviews the current poverty debates from the economic, policy, social, political, cultural and moral perspectives that influence the implementation of poverty reduction programs.

PHL 250

PHILOSOPHY AND SOCIAL CHANGE

Junior Year Experiential Learning

PSY 310

CONNECTING WITH YOUTH THROUGH RESEARCH, ADVOCACY, AND SERVICE: QUARTER I

This course is the first in a three-quarter service learning sequence designed to teach students the latest research on stressors affecting low-income urban communities and effective strategies for making a difference in those communities. Students will put their learning into practice by connecting as mentors and advocates with low-income urban adolescents.

PSY 311

CONNECTING WITH YOUTH THROUGH RESEARCH, ADVOCACY, AND SERVICE: QUARTER 2

This course is the second in a three-quarter service learning sequence designed to teach students the latest research on stressors affecting low-income urban communities and effective strategies for making a difference in those communities. Students will put their learning into practice by connecting as mentors and advocates with low-income urban adolescents.

PSY 312

CONNECTING WITH YOUTH THROUGH RESEARCH, ADVOCACY, AND SERVICE: QUARTER 3

This course is the third in a three-quarter service learning sequence designed to teach students the latest research on stressors affecting low-income urban communities and effective strategies for making a difference in those communities. Students will put their learning into practice by connecting as mentors and advocates with low-income urban adolescents.

SOC 394

COMMUNITY BASED SOCIOLOGY

Combines basic understanding of sociological principles with field experience.

SPN 391

SOCIOLINGUISTICS OF HERITAGE LANGUAGE LITERACY

This course explores the sociolinguistic issues related to gaining literacy in a heritage language, specifically, Spanish. This is a Junior Year Experiential Learning (JRYR) course, and as such requires 25 hours of service.

SPN 393

LATINO MEDIA AND DIGITAL CULTURE LITERACY

This course explores Latino media literacy from a local, national, transnational and bilingual perspective. This is a Junior Year Experiential Learning (JRYR) course, and as such requires 25 hours of service.

SPN 394

LATINO CULTURAL LITERACY AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

This course explores local Chicago histories and institutions and their engagement in politics and advocacy for Latinos. This is a Junior Year Experiential Learning (JRYR) course, and as such requires 25 hours of service.

WGS 320

TRANSFORMATIVE JUSTICE: THEORY AND PRACTICE

This course introduces students to transformative justice responses to violence that do not rely on state institutions. These include collective processes for support and healing, intervention, accountability, and prevention. The pedagogical praxis of learning will be through communal peacemaking circles and collectiev strategy sessions to create community responses to violence. Cross-listed as WGS 420.