Course Requirements

Concentration Core

Methods and Techniques

Choose two courses from the following list:

Systematic Surveys and Seminars

Choose one course from the following list:

Supporting Fields

  • ECO 105 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS
  • ECO 106 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS
  • Three urban-related courses selected from course offerings in Anthropology, Environmental Sciences, Geography, History, History of Art and Architecture, Political Science, Public Policy Studies, Real Estate, Sociology, or any other discipline or program selected in consultation with the student's advisor.

Open Electives 

Open elective credit also is required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours.​

GEO 133

URBAN GEOGRAPHY - EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

The course provides an in depth analysis of a Chicago neighborhood, connecting this to wider U.S. trends in urbanization and urban development. Students conduct a research project, through archival study and field work.

GEO 233

COMPARATIVE URBANISM

An exploration of non-U.S. urban and planning traditions, through the urban morphological and comparative study of the foundation, and social-political forces that shaped cities such as Paris, St. Petersburg, Istanbul, Bombay-Mumbai, Hong Kong, and Mexico City.

GEO 333

URBAN PLANNING

A seminar on the intellectual history and theories of urban planning and design, and their application in urban settings in the U.S. and abroad. Systematic study of case studies leads to the investigation of current urban planning issues in Chicago.

GEO 242

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS II: COMMUNITY GIS

An intermediate-level course. Students conduct real-world GIS projects for community organizations in Chicagoland. Topics include data capture, manipulation, database design, data quality, and spatial analysis. Students will complete projects following best practices of GIS project management. Instruction is accomplished through lectures and hands-on computer lab exercises using ArcGIS.
Prerequisites:
GEO 241 is a prerequisite for this class.

GEO 243

REMOTE SENSING

An introduction to the fundamentals of remote sensing, the analysis of the earth through air or space borne sensors. Special topics include image interpretation, image processing, urban change analysis, environmental monitoring, and photogrammetry. Instruction is accomplished through lectures and hands-on lab exercises using ArcGIS Desktop. A comprehensive final project using techniques learned from your work completes the course.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 491

ADMINISTRATIVE THEORY AND BEHAVIOR

This course concerns theoretical concepts and empirical research relating to administrative behavior in organizations with special reference to educational organizations. Concepts are examined within the typical decisional framework of supervisors, chief school business officers, principles, and superintendents, and similar positions in the helping professions. Assignments are individualized.
Prerequisites:
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

GEO 344

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS III: SPATIAL ANALYSIS FOR SUSTAINABLITY

An advanced-level course. Students conduct spatial analysis of sustainability issues of their interests. Topics include pattern point analysis, network analysis, spatial interpolation, and hydrologic modeling with GIS. Instruction is accomplished through lectures and hands-on computer lab exercises using ArcGIS. PREREQUISITE(S): GEO 242 or consent of instructor. Formerly GEO 244.
Prerequisites:
GEO 242 is a prerequisite for this class.

GEO 391

RESEARCH TECHNIQUES

An overview of research techniques in geography with a focus on a statistical approach. Students will get versed in quantitative reasoning by learning how statistical concepts and techniques are applied to geographic problems. Topics include research concepts, research design, descriptive statistics, and inferential statistics geared toward understanding geographic phenomena. Instruction is accomplished through lectures and hands-on exercises using calculators, SPSS and ArcGIS.
Prerequisites:
GEO 241 is a prerequisite for this class.

GEO 200

SUSTAINABLE URBANISM

This course focuses on the application and meaning of 'sustainability' to our discussion and understanding of cities, urban communities, and the urbanization process. The course conceptualizes sustainability as residing at the intersection of political, economic, social, and ecological thinking and examines its utility and flexibility towards urban form and function. The course pursues the topic of urban sustainability through the lenses of scale (e.g., local vs. global), justice (e.g., social vs. ecological), and diversity (e.g., cultural vs. biotic).

GEO 205

JUSTICE, INEQUALITY AND THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT

A theoretical and applied investigation of the social, political, and economic processes influencing the spatial distribution of environmental amenities and harms across the U.S. urban landscape, with particular focus on urban structure and the role of environmental justice struggles in shaping urban policy and the urban landscape.

GEO 215

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND REGIONAL INEQUALITY

This course charts the political, social and economic transformation of the developing countries, (Africa, Asia, Latin America, Caribbean, Pacific Islands) into a global economy dominated by the 'developed' countries (North America, Europe and Japan). This process, termed `GLOBALIZATION', results from the operation of the global market mechanism; the activities of Transnational Corporations (TNCs) and the programs of the International Financial Institutions (IFIs).

GEO 230

TRANSPORTATION GEOGRAPHY

The course is an introduction to the subfield of transportation geography. Studying transportation and transportation-related phenomena from a spatial-analytic perspective, the course builds upon theories and methods of transportation geography. Systematic study of select case studies at the local and regional level provide opportunities for application of principles.

GEO 266

THE WORLD ECONOMY

A study of the spatial effects of globalization. Topics include the geography of industrialization, spatial divisions of labor, global commodity chains, and industrial development in peripheral economies.

GEO 310

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

Green Infrastructure (GI) goes beyond the conventional conservation efforts of creating and maintaining national and state parks and wildlife refuges. Instead, GI promotes conservation that takes place at different spatial scales to create a network of open spaces out of existing open spaces and green corridors as well as offering strategies for constructing green spaces out of abandoned urban spaces.

GEO 331

CHICAGO: SPATIAL ANATOMY OF A METROPOLIS

An advanced exploration of Chicago's urban geography, focusing in detail on topics such as historical geography, industrial change, community development, housing, architecture, transportation and Chicago's status as a "global city."

GEO 339

TOPICS IN ARCHITECTURE AND URBANISM

Cities are changing dramatically as a result of the accelerated circulation of finance capital worldwide, the emergence of new information and data visualization technologies, the expansion of credit, the ceaseless retrenchment of population groups inside and around cities, and the emergence of new architectural and planning paradigms. The course explores and researches aspects of these transformative processes and their impacts on race, class, economic prosperity, and the contingencies of quality of urban life. A significant research and writing project is required in this specialist high-level course.

ECO 105

PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS

Principles of Microeconomics. Basic theories of micro (or individual) economic units; the theory of consumer demand, the firm, and distribution; pricing and production in competitive, monopolistic and oligopolistic industries.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or equivalent is a prerequisite for this class.

ECO 106

PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS

Principles of Macroeconomics. Fundamental theories of macro (or aggregate) economics: supply and demand, national income accounting and analysis, and international trade. Analysis of unemployment, and inflation, and policies designed to combat these and other current problems.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or equivalent is a prerequisite for this class.

GEO 343

REMOTE SENSING II

This course presents intermediate to advanced techniques in remote sensing, analysis of the earth through air or space borne sensors. Remote Sensing II provides 2nd level depth to some of the more advanced techniques of remote sensing and image interpretation. There is a special focus on urban/environmental applications of remote sensing, i.e. the detection, delineation, identification, and quantification of processes occurring in and around cities which affect the environment. Remote sensing technologies have, to an increasing extent, become integrated and deployed through geographic information systems (GIS) technology. Students learn to integrate techniques from this course to produce information products that are useful in the support of public and private decision-making. Techniques covered include advanced classification, georeferencing, LIDAR, and hyperspectral data analysis. The course will be taught through integrated hands-on activities, lectures and a comprehensive final project.
Prerequisites:
GEO 243 is a prerequisite for this course.