Course Requirements

200-Level Categories

Asia and the Middle East

Africa and Latin America

Premodern Europe and the Mediterranean to 1453

Early Modern Europe to 1800

Modern Europe and the U.S.

300-Level Categories

Asia, Africa and Latin America

Premodern Europe and the Mediterranean to 1453 

Early Modern Europe to 1800 

Modern Europe and the U.S. 

Open Electives

Open elective credit also is required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours.

HAA 101

AFRICAN ART

This course is based around a series of important issues in the study of African art, such as medium and color, portraiture, the artist and innovation, relationships with language, royal patronage, divination, gender, aesthetics, Othering, and authenticity. The course will explore each of these concepts through a variety of artistic traditions from the continent. In this manner, students will gain basic theoretical tools which will enable them to work with art from across Africa.

HAA 115

ASIAN ART

An introduction to major developments of art and architecture across Asia including South Asia, Southeast Asia, the Himalayas, and East Asia. This course examines not only painting, sculpture, and architecture, but also gardens, ceramics, and prints. Special emphasis will be placed on religious arts of Buddhism and Hinduism, along with landscape and figural painting of China and Japan. Formerly ART 242.

HAA 130

EUROPEAN ART

This introductory-level course examines the art historical methods and their application to a broad chronological and select survey of European art and architecture from pre-history to the 20th century. Field trips to Chicago art institutions extend the visual traditions and critical methods taught in class lectures and discussions. Arts and Literature Domain credit. Formerly ART 102.

HAA 145

ARTS OF THE AMERICAS

What is distinctive about art created over time on the American continents? This class begins to answer the question by examining some of the principal developments in art history from the ancient indigenous cultures (particularly those of Meso- and South America), through the period of European colonialism (especially Spanish and English), to the modern art movements across the sovereign nations, including the United States and Canada. Since time permits only a sampling of artistic forms across time, lectures are often issue-oriented, with a focus on selected problems facing scholars. Periodic discussions allow students to weigh in on topics and offer their own critiques. This class argues that the distinctiveness of American visual forms springs from the heterogeneous cultural traditions that simultaneously divide and unify its inhabitants.

HAA 399

SENIOR CAPSTONE: ART HISTORICAL THEORY & METHODOLOGY

An overview of theory and methods preparing advanced students for graduate work. The course addresses iconography, psychological theories, the image's relation to its documentation, feminist and social history and other currently debated issues.

HAA 230

ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN ART

This course will explore the art of the ancient period (circa 30,000 B.C.E. - 330 C.E.) from a broad range of cultures and styles: from the Paleolithic cave paintings to the Roman Colosseum, from the pyramids of Egypt to the Parthenon in Greece. We will consider how art, religion, urbanism and writing profoundly affected the development of the ancient Mediterranean and Mesopotamian world. We will analyze major stylistic trends and explore the relationship between art, culture, and religion. We will also discuss the role of art in the hands of political leaders and the profound interconnectedness of ancient civilizations. Frequent discussions will analyze controversies in the study of ancient art and scrutinize topics such as gender, power, aesthetics and authenticity. Formerly ART 233.

HAA 231

EARLY MEDIEVAL ART

This course explores the art of the Medieval period from a broad range of cultures: Early Christian, Byzantine, Islamic, Carolingian, and Ottonian. We will discuss major stylistic trends and explore the relationship between art, culture, and religion. Works of art will be evaluated in terms of their social functions in the societies that produced them and our analysis will incorporate the perspectives of both the producers (patrons, artists) and consumers of art. Cross-listed with CTH 253. Formerly ART 240.

HAA 232

LATE MEDIEVAL ART

This course will explore the art of the late Medieval period from a broad range of cultures and styles: Byzantine, Romanesque, Gothic, and Islamic. We will discuss major stylistic trends and explore the relationship between art, culture, and religion. Works of art will be evaluated in terms of their social functions in the societies that produced them and our analysis will incorporate the perspectives of both the producers (patrons, artists) and consumers of art. Cross-listed with CTH 254. Formerly ART 244.

HAA 236

NORTHERN RENAISSANCE ART

This course features the most significant works of art, their artists & patrons, the social & economic aspects of artistic production, and the dominant cultural issues that flowed brilliantly in Northern Europe - above all, in France, the Netherlands, Bohemia, and German-speaking lands - between 1300 and 1600, that is, during the volatile period of the Renaissance & outbreak of the Protestant Reformation. And although Flemish oil painting offers the most evident legacy of the Northern Renaissance to the casual museum visitor, this course also introduces the most important outputs in printmaking; sculpture; and the industrial arts, as in tapestry weaving and the fabrication of luxury articles in metalwork. Cross-listed as CTH 258. Formerly ART 232.

HAA 237

ITALIAN RENAISSANCE ART

This course concentrates on the architecture & pictorial arts that flourished on the Italian peninsula between ca. 1300 and 1600, although selected forays are undertaken into comparative European and Asian cultures. Its content focuses on the most significant works of art & architecture, including the technical arts; the key personalities, above all, the artists & their patrons; and a broad range of cultural & political issues that affected artistic thinking and production. Cross-listed with CTH 256. Formerly ART 241.

HAA 238

BAROQUE ART

Starting in 1600, from the vantage point of the Counter-Reformation and the rise of modern European states, Baroque Art covers the principal works of art & architecture; artists and patrons; and a wide sweep of social, religious, and political, conditions that impacted cultural thinking and production in the 17th century. Attention is focused on the most prominent artistic centers in Italy, the Spanish Netherlands, England, Spain, the Dutch Republic, and France. The in-class lectures with discussion are accompanied by field work to the Baroque collections of the Art Institute of Chicago. Cross-listed with CTH 257. Formerly ART 237.

HAA 239

19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART

Introductory survey of major moments and movements in 19th-century European art, with some attention to U.S. developments, as warranted. The course analyzes major painters and sculptors of the early modern period and their influence in shaping cultural events, such as, for example, the Industrial Revolution. Formerly ART 238.

HAA 240

ART FROM 1900-1945

This course will examine the major artists, movements, and issues at play in the visual arts of Europe from 1900 to the outbreak of World War II. Lectures and class discussions will address how modern art, often oppositional and contradictory in nature, responds to, reflects, or builds on the effects of modernization (i.e. urbanization, industrialization, and global capitalism). Modern art objects will be read for both stylistic innovation and for connections to, and commentaries on, specific historical developments. Significant themes to be addressed include the character and history of the avant-garde, the relationship between high art and mass culture, the changing identities and aims of the modern artist, and the institutional basis of art production. Formerly ART 239.

HAA 242

ART FROM 1945 - 1975

This course will consider art and culture of Western Europe and the United States from World War through the Vietnam War. Beginning with the period of high modernism, major art historical movements and highly distinct aesthetic practices will be examined in order to foreground the complex relations that exist between art making and specific socio-historical contexts. Topics to be addressed include the development of the arts after World War II, the role of art in a consumerist and spectacle-driven society, the dematerialization of the art object, and the shift from late modernist to postmodern sensibilities. Students will be introduced to a range of theoretical models which foreground structural and formal investigations, as well as issues of social and historical analysis. Formerly ART 322/HAA 364.

HAA 201

ANCIENT AFRICAN ART: PREHISTORIC TO THE EUROPEAN ENCOUNTER

This course surveys a selection of artistic traditions from across the African continent beginning with the earliest attempts by humanity to visually represent complex thought until the Portuguese began trading along the coast of West Africa in the mid-fifteenth century. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating connectedness with a larger cultural environment, while also suggesting connections to future artistic traditions. Crosslisted with ABD 247

HAA 202

MODERN AFRICAN ART: EUROPEAN ENCOUNTER TO INDEPENDENCE

This course surveys a selection of artistic traditions from across the African continent beginning with the arrival of the Portuguese along the coast of West Africa in the mid-fifteenth century until the age of African independence in the 1960s. While the impact of a European presence helps define the boundaries of this course, artistic response to that presence is but one theme. Interactions between African cultures and the impact of Islam are equally important considerations. Crosslisted with ABD 248

HAA 203

CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN ART: INDEPENDENCE TO THE PRESENT

This course surveys African art from the age of African independence in the 1960s until the present day. The meaning of the term contemporary as it applies to African art is questioned in this course. The position of the artist between African artistic tradition and the global art market is also of vital importance. Crosslisted with ABD 249

HAA 215

CHINESE ART

This is a chronological survey of premodern Chinese art from antiquity to the nineteenth century. Special attention is given to sculpture and painting, but architecture and ceramics are also covered. There is an emphasis on prehistoric bronze vessels, Buddhist sculpture, and landscape painting of the Song through Qing periods. Formerly ART 342.

HAA 216

JAPANESE ART

This is a chronological survey of premodern Japanese art, from the prehistoric era to the Meiji period (1868-1911). Topics covered include painting, sculpture, and architecture, as well as decorative arts, prints, and garden design. Special attention is given to Buddhist and Shinto religious arts, along with screen painting and woodblock prints. Formerly ART 343.

HAA 217

ARTS OF INDIA AND THE HIMALAYAS

This is a chronological survey of premodern arts of the subcontinent of South Asia and the Himalayas. We start with the Indus Valley Civilization and move through the nineteenth century, including Mughal arts. Special attention is given to the emergence of figural imagery in Buddhist and Hindu sculptural arts, and the development of religious architectural forms from early stupas and cave temples to later shrines.

HAA 245

ART OF THE ANDES

This survey of art of the ancient Andes (circa 1000BC-1530AD) focuses on the most artistically significant civilizations of South America and some of the difficulties encountered in studying them. Lectures explore visual traditions as diverse as the people they reflect; cultures to be covered include the Nazca, Moche, Tiahuanaco, Wari and Inca of Peru. We consider the relationship between form and content, and the relationship between art and its social context, as we much as we can understand it; however, especially because of the scarcity of primary source texts for the material, the class will also regularly raise questions of methodology in what is often identified as "pre-Columbian" scholarship.

HAA 246

ART IN THE SPANISH AMERICAN EMPIRE

This course offers a critical survey of the art of colonial Latin America (circa 1520s-1820s), from the Caribbean to Mexico, Central America, and South America. Framed by the Spanish Conquest of the 16th century and Independence in the early 19th century, lectures will survey state-sanctioned arts of the Iberian colonizers, including the foundations of the Catholic Church across the 'New World' landscape. Race will be a frequent issue of discussion as we consider both indigenous American and African participation in social realities and artistic practice in this colonial context. Cross-listed with CTH 250 and LST 248. Formerly ART 248.

HAA 247

MODERN LATIN AMERICAN ART

This lecture class is a survey of Latin American art created since the Wars of Independence which helped to create the modern nations in the 19th century (i.e. 1820s through the present). Lectures consider the struggle of artists to articulate newly sovereign identities through visual production, even as complicated relationships with Europe and increasingly, the United States, continue. Topics covered include Latin American modernism, surrealism, radical arts, and social realism, with a special consideration of post-revolutionary Mexican mural painting. Cross-listed with LST 249. Formerly ART 249.

HAA 260

AMERICAN ART

This course examines American art (the British colonies and United States) from the colonial period to the mid-twentieth century. Works of art are examined both in relation to American social and cultural history and also as aesthetic objects. The overarching themes of the class include the "American-ness" of American art, the relationship between American and European art, the function and production of art, and the expanding definition of American expression through multicultural diversity. Formerly ART 335. Crosslisted with AMS 295

HAA 234

BYZANTINE ART

This course will explore the art of the Byzantine Empire from the founding of Constantinople in A.D. 330 to the fall of the city to the Ottomans in 1453. Lectures and readings will primarily focus on how contemporaries understood and interacted with a diverse group of monuments and objects now classified as Byzantine art. Significant attention will be devoted to how works of art functioned in the service of imperial and ecclesiastical ideology. Discussions will analyze how Byzantine art was appreciated and appropriated in both the medieval Mediterranean and in modern scholarship. Crosslisted with CTH 252

HAA 222

ISLAMIC ART

This course examines the visual culture of the Islamic world, selectively surveying some of the major artistic developments in regions of the world with a significant Muslim population. It will consider art and architecture as interplay between local culture and Islamic tradition. Topics covered will include the origins of Islamic visual culture in the Arabian Peninsula and the spread of Islamic art and religion across the Middle East. Local expressions of Islamic art may be explored in areas as diverse as North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, Spain, Sicily, Iraq, Iran, India, and Central Asia. Special attention is paid to architecture, painting, and decorative arts. Cross-listed with IWS 251. Formerly ART 251.

HAA 220

BUDDHIST ART

This course explores the traditional visual culture of the Buddhist world, examining art as a reflection of religious belief and practice. The regions covered are South Asia, Southeast Asia, and East Asia. An emphasis is placed on painting, sculpture, and architecture made for or related to Buddhist practice. Formerly ART 250. Crosslisted with AAS 290

HAA 235

RUSSIA: MEDIEVAL MOMENTS, IMPERIAL DAYS & WHITE NIGHTS IN NOVGOROD & ST. PETERSBURG

This study abroad program in Russia allows students the opportunity to explore Novgorod, the medieval trading emporium and center of Orthodox spirituality and the Russian imperial gem of St. Petersburg, while studying medieval art and the history of Imperial Russia. Both cities have been designated UNESCO World Heritage Sites and showcase the best of medieval and modern Russia by providing one of the world's richest ensembles of urban planning, art, architecture, and historical treasures. (Foreign Study: can also be taken as HAA 397: Special Topics in Art History-Formerly ART 397)

HAA 263

HISTORY OF DESIGN

A survey of the history of modern design (1500-present) as expressed in graphic, industrial, and the decorative arts. The aim of this class is to understand why designed objects look the way they do considering their history, function, style, use, and materials. Of special interest will be design's relationship to culture, to art history, and to media. Students will learn to identify historic styles and the work of important designers and illustrators and to a certain extent, the history of material culture. Readings and the first-hand examination of objects lead toward a final research project. Formerly ART 373.

HAA 265

HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY

A survey of the major works, artists, and movements of photo history from photography's invention to the present day. Emphasis is placed on the major artists, subjects, and technical applications of the medium, as well as on the modernity of photography and its unique aesthetic qualities. This course will also consider the myriad purposes and social contexts for photography. The course examines a large range of techniques from the camera obscura to recent developments in printing. Actual photographs are studied in class, on campus, and in field trips to regional collections. The course involves major readings that ask students to consider the role of photography in relations to race, gender, and politics. Many of the photographs under consideration are American. Formerly ART 376.

HAA 280

HISTORY OF PREMODERN ARCHITECTURE

Social, economic and political history of European and Mediterranean architecture, from Paleolithic times to the 1789 French Revolution. Topics include: classicism, the status and role of the architect, social struggle, patronage and architectural technologies. Formerly ART 370.

HAA 281

HISTORY OF MODERN ARCHITECTURE

World architecture from the 1789 French Revolution to the present. Examines the influence of industrial, technological, political and social change in the development of modernist and post- modernist architecture. Formerly ART 371.

HAA 218

ARTS OF THE SILK ROAD

This course will examine the visual history of the Silk Road, focusing on works of art and architecture created in Central Asia. We not only consider the prehistoric, ancient and medieval arts of this region, but we also investigate the modern development of a romanticized notion of the Silk Road and the imperial interest in acquiring treasures from the Silk Road. Today we frequently hear about the legacy of the Silk Road in promoting multicultural exchange. However, the Silk Road has long been affected by the expansionist agendas of empires. From the time of Alexander the Great (356-323 B.C.E.) through the period of Genghis Khan (1162-1227) and on, there have been military leaders who have led their armies into Silk Road lands seeking territory, riches, and glory.

HAA 299

INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORICAL RESEARCH AND WRITING

The major must also take an introduction to research and writing in the field. This course will focus on one specific area of art history, as determined by the faculty member teaching. The faculty member will introduce the students to the methodological debates relevant to that research in the past and in the present. The focus of the course will be to introduce students to the theoretical language of art history and to work on the development of advanced critical thinking skills. This course prepares them for the advanced research work required at the 200- and 300-levels.
Prerequisites:
Declared major in History of Art and Architecture required.

HAA 301

AFRICAN ARCHITECTURE

This course examines a wide variety of issues pertinent to the study of architecture in Africa, highlighting above all else the diversity of traditions across the continent. Weekly themes are defined at times by materials, technology, type, geographical region, culture, or specific architectural elements. Examples of subjects studied include: earthen mosques of Mali; subterranean residences in Burkina Faso; nomadic tents; impluvial and courtyard traditions of Nigeria and Senegal; mural painting in Burkina Faso, Nigeria, and South Africa; Ethiopian rock cut churches; imperialist exploitation of Great Zimbabwe's legacy; and coral architecture of the Swahili Coast.. Formerly ART 347.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 302

AFRICAN ISLAM: ISLAMIC ART & ARCHITECTURE IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

Focused study of the impact of Islam on the artistic traditions of sub-Saharan Africa. Rather than necessarily replacing previous art forms, this course investigates in what circumstances preexisting visual culture might be integrated with the requirements and needs of Islam. This approach necessitates an understanding that neither Islam nor African art are monolithic entities, but rather their interactions represent a wide variety of negotiations across the continent. Likewise, this course will consider specific historical circumstances to which Islamic art in sub-Saharan Africa has responded in terms of form and content.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 311

LATER JAPANESE PAINTINGS AND PRINTS

This course examines two main pictorial forms of Japan from the seventeenth century to the early twentieth century (the Edo, Meiji, and Taisho periods). Special attention is given to large-scale painting on folding screens and sliding doors for major temples, castles, and palaces, as well as the development of ukiyo-e (pictures of the floating world) in woodblock prints. In addition, we consider the transformation of painting and prints in the late nineteenth century with the opening of Japan and the introduction of Western influences. art history and related disciplines.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 373

KYOTO (WORLD CITIES)

Explores the art, architecture, and urban plan of Kyoto, the ancient capital of Japan. Kyoto became the seat of government and the home of the imperial court in 794, and it continued to serve as the cultural and religious center of the land until the nineteenth century. This course considers major artistic developments as they relate to main sites in Kyoto, especially palaces, temples, and shrines. The eras covered extend from the Heian to the Meiji period. (Cities Minor)

HAA 375

MEXICO CITY

From its origins as Tenochtitlan, the preordained capital of the Aztec Empire, through its identification as a "new Rome" dominated by the Spanish Crown in the Viceregal period, to its status as the largest metropolitan area in the Western Hemisphere (and the second largest in the world), Mexico City was born to impress the imagination. This class explores the development of the great city of Mexico in light of major historical events and cultural expressions. Discussions will focus especially on urban planning, key architecture, outdoor sculpture, and public spectacles over the centuries.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 325

OLD EMPIES AND NEW GODS: CULTURAL CONFRONTATIONS IN LATE ANTIQUITY

This course focuses on how a clash of cultures and the emergence of new religions impacted the arts of the eastern Mediterranean in late antiquity (300 to 700 A.D.). It explores interactions between the Byzantine and Sasanian empires, as well as the creation of local and religious identities through art. It also investigates how the diverse religious climate (Christianity, Judaism, Paganism, Zoroastrianism, Islam) contributed to visual expression in the region.

HAA 328

THE POWER OF PIETY: ICONS, RELICS, AND MIRACLES IN THE MEDIEVAL WORLD

This course examines the intersection of personal devotion, public spirituality, and performance of faith in the medieval world. Probing a range of objects that give material expression to the desire for tangible links to the sacred and reminders of supernatural presence in the medieval world, the course analyzes miraculous objects that we would now categorize as works of art. Objects under discussion include a category broadly defined as reliquaries, fragments of the True Cross, images "not made by human hands," and miraculous icons.

HAA 331

ART OF THE CRUSADES: CRUSADES AS MEDITERRANEAN EXCHANGE

This course will consider the Crusades from multiple perspectives (Byzantine, Latin, Muslim) and explore how politics, religion, and culture influenced the art of the medieval Mediterranean. The Crusades are analyzed in the broader context of pilgrimage, the search for the divine, and the desire to seize control of and purify holy sites. The course will focus on works of art created when the cultures of the Mediterranean came into both contact and conflict.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 332

ROMANESQUE ART AND ARCHITECTURE

Scholars in the nineteenth century designated Western European monuments, especially architecture and sculpture, created between the eleventh and twelfth centuries, as "Roman-like" in character or "Romanesque," in order to acknowledge certain linkages they perceived between the characteristics of this era's architectural and visual language and that of the distant Roman past. Recent scholarship has emphasized not only large-scale works of art, architecture and sculpture, crucial in an age of Pilgrimage and Crusades, but also small-scale works, such as illuminated manuscripts, metalwork, and coins and seals, as essential for an understanding of medieval visual culture. This class considers the broad spectrum of significant works of art produced during this period from shifting points of view, aesthetic or formalist toward function, agency, presentation and reception.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 333

GOTHIC ART AND ARCHITECTURE

This course examines the art, architecture, history and culture of the so-called Gothic era (12th-15th centuries), the age of the great European cathedrals. Reigning supreme in most of Europe in the 13th and 14th centuries, the Gothic style marks an era of unparalleled building activity and one of the most fertile and productive periods in the history of Western art. Special emphasis will be given to the aesthetic, structural, and spiritual aspects of cathedrals and other great churches and their contents, primarily in France and England, as reflections and embodiments of the sacred aspirations and devout character of the era. The artistic and architectural production (buildings, sculptures, illuminated manuscripts, paintings, sacred or liturgical objects, stained glass, etc.) of the period will be studied in its original context, with close attention paid to questions of social and political function, cultural meaning, and historical circumstance.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 334

ENGLISH ART AND ARCHITECTURE

This course considers painting, sculpture and architecture in England from Stonehenge to the modern period. It explores national identity, the monarchy, contested notions of church and state, colonization, and the influence of other nations' art. Until a few decades ago, Britain oversaw the largest empire the world had ever known (America itself was a colony, and speaks the language of the British). The oldest continuous monarchy in the world also witnessed the birth of a parliamentary system of government. The Industrial Revolution was born there. Throughout its history, though, the arts have had a complex existence. Reformation iconoclasts destroyed churches and sacred art, and native masters such as Hogarth, Turner, and Barbara Hepworth, stand beside emigre artists such as Holbein, Rubens, Van Dyck, and Whistler. Critical reading and writing lead to a substantial final research project. Formerly ART 365.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 376

ROME

Few cities in the world match Rome for its antiquity, imperial heritage, historic, religious and cultural importance, spectacular art and architecture, and rich urban landscape. Traditionally believed to have been founded by Romulus and Remus, descendents of Aeneas, in 753 BCE, and subsequently ruled by Etruscan kings, Rome's public buildings, communal baths, and fortifications suggest that Rome was urbanized as early as the 6C BCE. After the expulsion of their Etruscan monarchs, Romans established the Republic, which evolved into the Roman Empire when Octavian, grand nephew of Julius Caesar, became Augustus, Rome's first emperor, princeps or first citizen. Along with subsequent emperors determined to turn Rome into a magnificent city worthy to be the capital of a great empire, Augustus used architecture and the built environment as massive symbols of power, authority, and legitimacy, a lesson in public education embraced by the Catholic Church when the imperial pagan capital became the capital of Western Christendom and the seat of the papacy. This class explores the city of Rome from its ancient origins through the 17th century and focuses on the major art and architectural developments that define this unique urban space.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 378

HEAVENLY AND EARTHLY JERUSALEM (WORLD CITIES)

This class focuses on the city of Jerusalem. The uniqueness of Jerusalem stems from its status as a sacred place in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. In this class we will explore the physical city of Jerusalem with its monuments, contested holy sites, and changing architecture. We will also analyze representations of the imagined heavenly Jerusalem, for which many believers intensely yearned. The class will focus on Jerusalem from the 2nd through the 16th centuries: from its destruction by Roman armies to its last pre-modern construction phase during the Ottoman period. We will discuss how different religious groups mapped meaning and marked holiness in the urban fabric of Jerusalem. This class will consider some of the following issues: art and architecture, politics, religion, urban planning, and patronage. (Cities MInor)
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 397

SPECIAL TOPICS/HISTORY OF ART & ARCHITECTURE

Focused study on a specific topic from the history of World art. Formerly ART 397.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 335

MICHELANGELO

This course examines the extraordinary life, times and creations of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564), one of the most significant figures in the history of Western art. Sculptor, painter, architect and poet, Michelangelo lived during the Italian Renaissance, an age that witnessed a flourishing artistic, scientific and humanistic culture. During a career that spanned over seven decades, Michelangelo created famous lasting masterpieces, including the Vatican Pieta, David, Moses, the Sistine Chapel ceiling, and the papal church of St. Peter's. Who is this irascible and solitary genius, this devout Catholic and fierce Republican Florentine, who cavorted and lived with popes and princes, and fashioned works that profoundly influenced Western civilization? How do his brilliant achievements define, express and illuminate the time, place and culture in which he lived? Drawing on a variety of primary and secondary sources, this course seeks to understand an eccentric artist whose dazzling aesthetic productivity left a lasting mark on the art of future generations up to the modern period. Formerly ART 308.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 340

PRINCIPAL THEMES IN 18TH-CENTURY ART

This course is intended to enrich the student's understanding of a fascinating and cosmopolitan period that tends to slip through the cracks of traditional Art History - namely, the transition zone between the Late Baroque and the emergent modernism of the 19th century, which takes place just before and after the "Great Divide" of the French Revolution of 1789. Building from a platform of European traditions that flowered in the 17th century, the course material explores an impressive body of painting & printmaking, sculpture & industrial arts, and architecture & planning, that was produced from the British Isles to imperial Russia, even, by way of addressing cross-disciplinary issues, for example : the diverse stylistic developments that start with the Rococo & Neoclassicism; artistic regionalism vis-a-vis internationalism; and the larger social & political arenas for which visual culture was produced in the Ages of Enlightenment and Revolution. Formerly ART 352.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 379

PARIS AND VICINITY TO CIRCA 1870 (WORLD CITIES)

This course is designed to explore the arts & architecture, and urban planning of Paris & vicinity, from the period of the Old Regime to ca. 1870. This span more or less coincides with the art historical periods from the Renaissance to early Impressionism. The course material weaves artistic works and projects into the greater cultural, political, and social fabric of the realm --- and includes, among other outstanding personalities, the towering impact of Vincent de Paul --- in order to expose the student to a variety of cross-disciplinary perspectives. Several class sessions are scheduled at the Art Institute of Chicago.(Cities Minor) Formerly ART 366.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 384

BERLIN: UNIFICATION/REUNIFICATION (WORLD CITIES)

The influence of art and architecture on the development of Berlin from 1871 to the present. How major figures (from Bismarck to Kohl) and major events (from World Wars to the fall of the Berlin Wall) affected the city and its culture. (Cities Minor) Formerly ART 367.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 360

DUCHAMP AND DADAISM

With Picasso and Matisse, Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968) was among the most important artists of the modern era. Certainly, no other artist influenced contemporary art so significantly, and this class will examine his art, biography, and influence. Another focus will be the cultural movement known as Dadaism (1916-24), a delirious anti-art movement begun in Zurich, Switzerland, during the absurd, bloody First World War. After contextualizing Dada in relation to modern art, we will examine its manifestations in various world centers. Along the way, we will encounter the works of many of its most important figures. Besides the inherent value of looking closely at cultural moment of an important historical figure, the study of Dadaism has special relevance because of its timeless iconoclasm and spirit of creative experimentation. Close readings of primary and secondary texts, as well as trips to area museums, culminate in a significant research project.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 363

ART & THE HOLOCAUST

This course explores the relationship of art and architecture to the development of National Socialist Germany and Nazi policies of genocide towards the European Jews. It deals with artists that resisted the Nazi rise to power, those that supported it, and those that were persecuted by the new state. In addition, we will look at a wide range of art, architecture and film produced from 1933-1945 which were mobilized as part of the radicalizing anti-Semitic policy. The central questions will be how does art intersect with one of the most criminal regimes in the modern period and what can we learn from an understanding of the political history of art during the period? The course will be lecture/discussion format and include a research paper. Formerly ART 356.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 365

ART SINCE 1975

This course will address visual art production of a global context from the end of the Vietnam War to the present. Taking postmodernism as its starting point, the nature of contemporary art practice will be examined as it is redefined by new technologies and media (such as video, installation, performance, and digital art), and through an investigation of critical theoretical models. Traditional media, such as painting and sculpture, will also be assessed as a crucial part of this shifting terrain. Major themes to be considered include questions of identity and subject formation, the relationship between art and its audience, changing notions of artistic value, and the impact of globalization. Throughout, students will be exposed to the issues and ideas relevant to cultural production today, while simultaneously developing the visual and conceptual tools for critically analyzing contemporary art.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 366

TOPICS ON WOMEN AND ART

This class considers both the history of women artists and representations of women from cultures around the world, from prehistory to the contemporary era. In addition, it will introduce feminist methodologies that can be applied to specific case studies, such as problems of biography for women artists, depictions of sexual violence in art, performing gender in visual images, feminist activist collaborations and gendered spaces (the museum, cyberspace, architecture, etc.) Topics may vary term to term, depending on the instructor's area of expertise. Formerly ART 381.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 367

FEMINISM & VISUAL CULTURE

This course addresses how gender is inscribed in visual culture, whether in "fine art" or popular representations. Students will be introduced to a broad range of feminist methodologies, such as Marxism, Post-Colonial, Queer and Transnational theories, as well as semiotics, in order to interrogate representations of gender and investigate strategies of intervention.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 370

CONTEMPORARY ARCHITECTURAL THEORY AND PRACTICE

Study of contemporary debates in architecture and urban planning. The student explores economic, social and political aspects of architectural theory through a case study of a contemporary monument or city plan. Formerly ART 372.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 371

HISTORIC CATHOLIC CHURCH ARCHITECTURE OF CHICAGO

This course covers a selection of the jewels among the city's architecturally significant Catholic churches and related sites of interest that date up to circa 1920. The class meets in a non-traditional time slot (in 3-hour afternoon sessions) in order to undertake the necessary field work, which is administered through the Catholic Studies Program and in partnership with CTH 201: Catholicism in Chicago. This approach encourages us to think about the sacred buildings as extensions of the city's history, while emphasizing the contributions of its various immigrant groups. By thus using architecture & architectural history as the armature of this course, the student is able to explore the fascinating interplays between art, history, religion & society, and come to terms with what culture does and signifies in one's own milieu. (Offered jointly with Catholic Studies). Formerly ART 374.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 380

CHICAGO ARCHITECTURE AND URBANISM (WORLD CITIES)

This course investigates contemporary historiographic debates and new archival evidence surrounding research on Chicago architecture and urbanism. In addition to participating in lectures/discussions of HAA 380, students also meet separately to discuss scholarly debates as well as their individual research proposals, as appropriate for graduate level work. (Cities Minor) Formerly ART 339.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 391

MUSEUM STUDIES

Introduces art historians to the theory and practice of exhibition management and curatorial principles. Stresses organization, research, care and presentation of exhibitions through project-oriented study.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 385

LONDON (WORLD CITIES)

Examines London as a nexus of English artistic and architectural activity and emphasizes the role of the monarchy, such art world institutions as patronage or the foundation of the Royal Academy, and the city's historic growth. (Cities Minor) Formerly ART 368.
Prerequisites:
100/200-level History of Art and Architecture course or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

HAA 219

JAPANESE FILM ARTS

This course examines the development of cinema as an artistic form in Japan, from its inception in the early twentieth century to its explosion as an international phenomenon in recent decades. The Japanese cinematic experience is considered as visual expression that parallels key Japanese arts of handscroll painting and woodblock prints. We discuss such genres as samurai films, fantasy tales, monster movies, yakuza thrillers, and science fiction anime. Among the masterpieces studied are Ozu?s Tokyo Story, Kurosawa?s Rashomon, Itami?s Funeral, and Miyazaki?s Spirited Away. Issues addressed in relation to these films include artistic expression, technological progress, national identity, social unrest, and religious concern.

HAA 297

SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY OF ART & ARCHITECTURE

This class focuses study on a specific topic from the history of world art.

HAA 244

ART OF MESOAMERICA

This survey of art of the ancient Mesoamerica (circa 1000BC-1520AD) focuses on the most artistically significant civilizations of Middle America and some of the difficulties encountered in studying them. Lectures explore visual traditions as diverse as the people they reflect; cultures to be covered include the Olmec, Maya, Teotihuacan, and Aztec. We consider the relationship between form and content, and the relationship between art and its social context, as we much as we can understand it; however, especially because of the scarcity of primary source texts for the material, the class will also regularly raise questions of methodology in what is often identified as "pre-Columbian" scholarship.