Course Requirements

Individualized Concentration (5 courses)

In consultation with a faculty mentor, all international studies students devise a five-course concentration.  This concentration should provide students with a depth of knowledge on a particular theme, approach, region, and/or question of some international importance. Hence, a student might explore environmental movements (theme), Green Marxism (approach), Latin America (region), and/or theories of democratic transition (question). Concentrations must be approved by a faculty mentor in order to fulfill the major requirement.

  • Study Abroad: Up to two of the non-language courses you take during Study Abroad may be counted toward the concentration. These classes must be topical and fit with your concentration (for example no phonetics or grammar courses). Your faculty advisor will decide if any additional Study Abroad classes will be able to count towards the concentration.
  • Double Majors/Minors: Three classes can be taken from the double major or minor classes and applied to the concentration. The classes must have an International and Political/Social/Economic focus and relate to your concentration.
  • Foreign Language Courses: Topical language courses, such as courses focused on literature, civilization or genre can be applied to the concentration. Advanced language classes focused on phonetics or style cannot be applied.​

Language Requirement

Proficiency in a language other than English is required and can be demonstrated through passing grades in college coursework through the intermediate (second-year) level, up to and including 106. Students who enter the program with second language skills developed outside of formal college coursework may petition the director to demonstrate proficiency by examination in order to satisfy the language requirement. The assessment and proficiency tests can be taken on Campus Connection.

INT 201

THE EVOLUTION OF THE MODERN NATION STATE

This course focuses on the complex relationship between race, gender, ethnicity and nationality and explores how this relationship shapes the evolution of the modern state. The historical consolidation of the nation state and the development of national institutions are analyzed, using examples from both 19th- and 20th-century Europe and the contemporary Third World. This course is the first in the required three-course sequence. For that reason, it is open to declared majors and minors only. Other students may take the course on a space-available basis, with the permission of the director. PREREQUISITE(S): Sophomore major or minor status, or permission of the director.
Prerequisites:
Sophomore standing or above and status as an International Studies major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

​Open Electives

Open elective credit is also required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours. International Studies majors have 60 open elective credit hours. Courses taken to meet the second language proficiency requirement count as electives. 

 

INT 202

INTERNATIONAL CONFLICT AND COOPERATION

This course analyzes the nature of power in the international arena, conflicts that emerge among nations, and processes through which conflict may be resolved. It includes a critical perspective on realism and the other mainstream theories of international relations.
Prerequisites:
INT 201 and status as an International Studies major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

INT 203

INTERNATIONAL MOVEMENTS IN THE 20TH AND 21ST CENTURIES

This course evaluates the major social movements that have shaped international developments in the 20th and 21st centuries. Includes discussions of the varieties of socialism, race, colonization and decolonization of the Third World.
Prerequisites:
INT 201, INT 202 and status as an International Studies major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

INT 204

CULTURAL ANALYSIS

This course introduces the student to the models and logic of cultural analysis. Building on experiences from the previous courses, it offers students the opportunity to explore a problem of meaning in their everyday lives. Students acquire greater confidence in dealing with cultural issues. Cross-listed as ANT 386.

INT 205

INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

Topics discussed include the theory of comparative advantage, trade, immigration, alternatives to neoclassical trade theory, the third world debt crisis of the 1980s and 1990s, global financial institutions, and recurrent financial crises.
Prerequisites:
ECO 105 and ECO 106 are prerequisites for this class.

INT 206

IDENTITIES AND BOUNDARIES

This course explores how identity formation is shaped by cultural, historical, and political construction of barriers, borders, and boundaries, and how such formations are intertwined with ethnicity, race, nationality, gender and class.

INT 301

SENIOR SEMINAR

Combines formal class work and independent research. Raises philosophical questions about the nature of and prospects for a new international order, and discusses appropriate methodologies for the field. Culminates in a senior research paper.
Prerequisites:
Senior standing and declared International Studies major or minor are prerequisites for this course.

ECO 105

PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS

Principles of Microeconomics. Basic theories of micro (or individual) economic units; the theory of consumer demand, the firm, and distribution; pricing and production in competitive, monopolistic and oligopolistic industries.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or equivalent is a prerequisite for this class.

ECO 106

PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS

Principles of Macroeconomics. Fundamental theories of macro (or aggregate) economics: supply and demand, national income accounting and analysis, and international trade. Analysis of unemployment, and inflation, and policies designed to combat these and other current problems.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or equivalent is a prerequisite for this class.

PSC 150

INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS

This course focuses on the way in which political systems other than that of the United States operate. The common features of governments are identified and examined with special attention to such topics as political elites, political institutions, mass political behavior, political change and revolution. Examples are drawn from a wide range of political systems.

INT 368

TOPICS IN GLOBAL CULTURE

A course that offers students the opportunity to explore global cultural studies in greater depth. See schedule for current offerings.

GEO 241

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS I

An introductory-level course covering the fundamentals of GIS. Topics include GPS, remote sensing, data models (vector and raster), coordinate systems, and map design. Instruction is accomplished through lectures and hands-on computer lab exercises using ArcGIS.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this class.

GEO 242

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS II: COMMUNITY GIS

An intermediate-level course. Students conduct real-world GIS projects for community organizations in Chicagoland. Topics include data capture, manipulation, database design, data quality, and spatial analysis. Students will complete projects following best practices of GIS project management. Instruction is accomplished through lectures and hands-on computer lab exercises using ArcGIS.
Prerequisites:
GEO 241 is a prerequisite for this class.

GEO 243

REMOTE SENSING (FORMERLY GEO 343)

An introduction to the fundamentals of remote sensing, the analysis of the earth through air or space borne sensors. Special topics include image interpretation, image processing, change analysis, environmental monitoring, and photogrammetry. Instruction is accomplished through lectures and hands-on lab exercises using IDRISI. A small lab fee will be charged.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this class.

INT 201

THE EVOLUTION OF THE MODERN NATION STATE

This course focuses on the complex relationship between race, gender, ethnicity and nationality and explores how this relationship shapes the evolution of the modern state. The historical consolidation of the nation state and the development of national institutions are analyzed, using examples from both 19th- and 20th-century Europe and the contemporary Third World. This course is the first in the required three-course sequence. For that reason, it is open to declared majors and minors only. Other students may take the course on a space-available basis, with the permission of the director.
Prerequisites:
Sophomore standing or above and status as an International Studies major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

HON 201

STATES, MARKETS, AND SOCIETIES

This course focuses on the organization of economic, political and social relationships within the global system, including analysis of how these relationships affect the distribution of power, resources, well-being and cultural capital in different societies. It covers such topics as phases in the growth of global trade and investment; the role of economic incentives; the historical and conceptual relationship between markets; social stratification, culture, and forms of popular participation; and the development challenges posed by international inequality and social marginality.
Prerequisites:
Membership in the University Honors Program is a prerequisite for this class.

GEO 201

GEOPOLITICS

A survey of theories of geopolitics and international relations, the course explores issues of international security and organization, regional integration, and nationalism, state formation and conflict. Historic geopolitical cases from Europe (Northern Ireland, EU, Balkans), the Middle East and North Africa, and the Russian realm, provide opportunities to assess theoretical approaches and profile the security and foreign policy concerns of the U.S.in the new millennium.