Middle Eastern Islam Concentration

Choose any five courses from the following list:
 

Islam and World Politics Concentration

Choose any five courses from the following list:

History of Islam Concentration

Choose any five courses from the following list:

Islamic Thought Concentration

Choose any five courses from the following list:

Individually Constructed Concentration

Must be approved by Program Director and consist of 5 courses/20 credits.

Open Electives

Open elective credit also is required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours.
  

 

ANT 240

CULTURES OF THE MIDDLE EAST

Explores the cultures and societies of the contemporary Middle East. Focuses on everyday life and practices, such as religion, social organization, art and popular culture. Uses ethnographic sources to examines the historical influence of various civilizations and religions on contemporary Middle Eastern societies from North Africa to Iran.

HST 142

THE MUSLIM WORLD, 1000-1500

Sultans, Khans and Shaykhs: Medieval Islamic History (1000-1500). A survey of Muslim history from the decline of the Arab caliphate to the rise of the great gunpowder empires, addressing themes of political expansion, military slavery, devastation brought about by the twin plagues of the Mongols and the Black Death, and the growth of Islamic mysticism. Formerly HST 224.

HST 143

THE MUSLIM WORLD, 1400-1920

Great Empires (1400-1920). Examines the social, cultural and economic histories of the Ottoman-Turkish, Safavid Iranian and Mughal-Indian empires which dominated the Muslim world in the crucial centuries between the end of the Mongol empire and the advent of European dominance. Formerly HST 225.

HST 366

THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA

The history of the region since 1800. Topics covered include the end of Ottoman Empire, the impact of European Imperialism and the renewal of Islam.
Prerequisites:
HST 199 or HST 299 is a prerequisite for this class.

PSC 255

MIDDLE EAST POLITICS

This course explores contemporary political issues in the Middle East. It includes country profiles, a review of the Arab-Israeli conflict, analysis of opposing viewpoints about the revival of Islam and about Islamic fundamentalism, and the region's position in the emerging new world order.

IWS 263

RELIGION AND POLITICS IN THE MIDDLE EAST

An exploration of Judaism, Christianity and Islam as they develop and interact in the Middle East, historically and in terms of contemporary religious and political issues. Includes a study of personal narratives of people from Jewish, Christian and Muslim communities. Cross-listed as REL 263.

ANT 241

WOMEN IN MIDDLE EASTERN SOCIETIES

Explores the experience of women in the Middle East using ethnographic sources from North Africa, the Levant, Arabian Peninsula, Turkey, and Iran. Focuses on the cultural and historical influences on women's lives in this area, and the strategies Middle Eastern women use to negotiate and affect sociocultural change today.

IWS 272

MUSLIM WOMEN IN TEXTS (CROSS-LISTED AS REL 272)

Explores major current approaches to the study of Muslim women, focusing on the Qur'anic conversation on women, on the commentaries provided by men, and on the emerging voices of Muslim women and non-Muslims. Cross-listed as REL 272.

SOC 209

SOCIOLOGY OF WOMEN

Cross-cultural analysis of women's roles. How various social institutions the media, work, the family, education, religion treat sex-role distinctions and how the women's movement is attempting to confront them.

WGS 307

WOMEN IN THE MIDDLE EAST: BEYOND THE VEIL

This course explores how Middle Eastern Women have been represented in the media outside of the Middle East, by Arab women scholars, and "Third World" feminists and challenges these representations by focusing on issues such as veiling, the everyday lives of Middle Eastern Women, political activism, literary works, economics and social class, and media representations.

WGS 390

WOMEN ACROSS CULTURES (CROSS-LISTED AS MLS 441, WGS 490)

A critical analysis of the experiences of women around the world in diverse social contexts, examined through different disciplines, with a special emphasis on economics, politics and culture. Focus is on African, Asian and Latin American cultures and nondominant groups within western societies. PREREQUISTE(S): WGS 200, one WGS course and either junior/senior standing or permission of Women's and Gender Studies Director required. (Cross-listed as WGS 490 and MLS 441)

WGS 391

METHODS AND SCHOLARSHIP IN WOMEN'S STUDIES

An exploration of the transforming effects that feminist methodologies and scholarship have had in the social sciences and humanities. This course emphasizes interdisciplinary research approaches, feminist publishing, and the interplay of research and activism, as it prepares students to write a research proposal. Not recommended for non-majors. (Cross-listed as WGS 491)

IWS 265

REFORM MOVEMENTS WITHIN ISLAM

This course will deal with the idea of "reform" within Islamic political movements in the modern period. The course will analyze various Islamic reform movements such as the Wahahabis, the Muslim Brotherhood, the Modernists, the Traditionalists, seeking a pattern in these movements. Cross-listed as REL 265.

IWS 295

SECTARIAN MOVEMENTS WITHIN ISLAM

This course will look at the various sects within Islam such as Shi'ism, Kharjism, etc. The course will also look at theological sects such as the Mu'taziliets. The course will be concerned with the history, the beliefs, and the present circumstances (if they still exist today) of these sects. Cross listed as REL 295.

PSC 349

ADVANCED TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Advanced topics in international relations.

PSC 359

ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS

Advanced topics in comparative politics.

REL 205

RELIGION AND ETHICS II

Analytic and normative approaches to ethics in a non-Christian tradition, such as Judaism, Islam or African traditional religions.

IWS 270

ISLAMIC ETHICS

Ethics is concerned with the character, customs, principles or standards of human conduct. Ethics is also concerned with the norms of human conduct. Islam is considered an essentially ethical religion meaning that it is fundamentally concerned with establishing the norms of human conduct in a relationship with God. Islamic conceptions of ethics/morality derive directly from the Qur?an. The lives of Muslims should ideally reflect the spiritual characteristics preferred by the Qur?an. In Islam there is no real distinction between being religious and ethical. In this course students will explore the ethical world of Muslims through glimpses of Islamic thought on pluralism, politics, abortion, war, euthanasia, and social justice.

HST 226

ISLAM AND THE WEST: A SURVEY OF ORIENTALISM

From "heresy" to "the Green Threat," this course studies the changing perceptions of Islam and the Islamic world held by those in "Western" societies from the time of the Crusades down to the contemporary era.

PSC 347

ETHICS IN WORLD POLITICS

Drawing on general theories of international relations and historical cases, this course examines both the forces that inhibit the development and effectiveness of ethical norms at the international level and the conditions under which such norms develop and affect the behavior of states and other actors.

SOC 204

THE IMMIGRANT EXPERIENCE

This course deals with the immigrant experience in the United States examining immigration and its effects on both this immigrants and the larger society, from the earliest days of this nation to the present. Students consider the demographic aspects of immigration, patterns of societal inclusion and exclusion, institution building, existential issues, cultural issues, economic issues, legal issues, educational issues, political issues and the nature of multiculturalism in the U.S.

IWS 327

MEDIA AND ISLAM

Media and Islam examines the journalistic techniques and communication theories behind how mainstream U.S. news media , print, broadcast and online bring news and information about the Arab and Muslim worlds to the American public. The course pairs media pieces with academic writing to stimulate critical thinking on media coverage of 1) characterizations of Muslims and Islam, including Islamic diversity, 2) contextual links between political Islam and Western/U.S. policies in the Muslim world, 3) the concept of jihad, 4) the status of Muslim women, and 5) the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The course is presented in a three-hour, weekly seminar format and stresses reading, discussion and class participation. Written requirements are a midterm essay (assigned two weeks before due date) and a final media research paper on an approved topic of choice. There are no exams or quizzes.

IWS 302

MODEL ARAB LEAGUE

This course is centered around students' participation in the Model Arab League as delegates from member-states chosen by IWS. Students engage with others from universities in the Mid-West region on the most important social, economic, environmental, cultural and political issues facing Arab leaders and ordinary citizens. The in-class component will include pertinent background information in these areas along with a specific focus on parliamentary procedure of the states they will represent.

HST 152

SOUTH ASIA, C. 900 CE TO 1707

The course begins with the transformation of society from the 'ancient' to the 'medieval', and compares it to developments in Europe in the feudal age. It then incorporates specific developments in South Asia: political, social, cultural; that came about with the establishment of powerful Islamic states in a region where Muslims were a minority. These issues will inform the analysis of the Ghaznavid and Ghurid invasions, the Delhi Sultanate, the Vijayanagara empire and the Mughal empire. The course will end with the Marathas and the decline of the Mughal empire, and the rising influence of the British. The central themes concern how the state, economy, culture, and society developed in the period when Islam became firmly embedded in South Asia.

HST 153

SOUTH ASIA, 1707-1947

The course begins with the decline of the Mughal Empire, and then moves to examine the British empire, the nationalist movement and finally to independence and partition in 1947. The central questions of this course continue to be relevant in the post-colonial period: how we understand the distinctive form of modernity that has developed in South Asia. Taking a comparative approach as often as possible, the course examines the fundamental ways that Britain was as transformed by the development of its empire as was colonial India. The course constantly deconstructs easy binaries of self and others/ East and West by examining the differences within Indian and British society. Formerly HST 257.

HST 353

MODERN INDIA AND PAKISTAN

Examines the modern history of India, giving special attention to India as a prototype of economic and political change in the Third World.
Prerequisites:
HST 199 or HST 299 is a prerequisite for this class.

HST 364

PALESTINE UNDER THE BRITISH MANDATE

This course examines the foundation and evolution of the British Mandate of Palestine from 1914 to 1948 in its British imperial, Middle Eastern, and world historical contexts. Students will engage primary and secondary sources associated with controverted issues, including Zionism, creation of the Mandate, immigration, and inter-communal confllict.
Prerequisites:
HST 199 or HST 299 is a prerequisite for this class.

HST 391

LOCAL AND COMMUNITY HISTORY

Collaborative learning groups will work with community partners in order to produce a tangible end-of-quarter public history project whose audience will be the greater Chicago community. This course carries a junior year experiential learning credit.
Prerequisites:
HST 199 or HST 299 is a prerequisite for this class.

IWS 278

INTRODUCTION TO THE HADITH

This course will introduce students to the hadith (the tradition of the Prophet Muhammad). The course will look at the historical development of the collection, study, and criticism of the hadith. Students will learn the utilization of the hadith in the establishment of Muslim religious practices, law, political and cultural norms. Students will become familiar with the technical terms that are utilized by the scholars of hadith. Students will also come to understand the modern debates about hadith study and hadith utility (or lack there of) in the modern world.

IWS 341

MUSLIM INTELLECTUAL TRENDS 1900-PRESENT

Modernization and its attendant demands for economic, political and sometimes religious change ignited Muslim thought in the 20th century. Various western theories on modernity and modernization are perceived in the Muslim world as imperialistic and directly linked to threats of neo-colonialism. This course engages a variety of scholars in an exclusively textual approach, seeking to 'strike a balance' between analysis of their seminal texts and philosophical frameworks. We will examine the works of six scholars and the contexts that define them such as race, class, and gender.

IWS 271

THE QUR'AN AND ITS INTERPRETERS

A study of the origin, transmission, and interpretation of the Qur'an. Cross listed as REL 271.

IWS 345

ISLAMIC PHILOSOPHY

This course looks at one of the main intellectual outgrowths of the Islamic tradition: Falsafa (Philosophy), the translation movement it spawned, and its interaction with Greek and Hellenistic philosophy. As we look at this historical development we will read important Islamic philosophers such as: al-Kindi, al-Farabi, Ibn Sina, Ghazali, Ibn Rushd, Ibn Hazm, Ibn Tufayl, Ibn Bajjah, Suhrawardi, Nasir al-Din Tusi and Mulla Sadra.

IWS 330

ISLAMIC LAW, ITS HISTORY AND MODERN APPLICATIONS

This course is a brief introduction to Islamic Law and its history including case studies of its modern applications. Students will trace the history of Islamic legal theory from its beginnings until the modern period. The focus is on the early formation of theory-its major themes and arguments along with the variety of doctrines that contribute to it. Students will examine how the socio-religious realities interface with the production of legal discourse as they build on previous coursework on modern reformers and the sources of law. This course will also explore the ongoing conversations over religious faith as the basis of a legal system. Last, we transition to the contemporary period through case studies where we will consider how the case connects with or departs from these larger debates and the different contemporary methodologies and arguments used.

REL 324

ISLAMIC LAW (SHARIAH) AND AMERICAN CULTURE

An intensive study of the many dimensions of religious liberties in a pluralist society. Explores the language of constitutional and political discourse generally, and the ways in which language affects an understanding of the First Amendment. Includes case studies on particular religious communities and their encounters with American law.