Course Requirements

Core

Arabic Language Requirement

Concentration Requirements:​

Students must also complete the requirements from one of the following concentrations: Middle Eastern Islam; Women in Islam; Islam and World Politics; Islam in the United States; or Individually Constructed.
 

​ 

 

IWS 191

ISLAMIC WORLD STUDIES

This course is the introductory course to the program. This course is to familiarize the students with the study of Islam by introducing them to the central texts - the Qur'an, Hadith literature (reports of the actions and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad), and Sira (the biography of the Prophet)- and methodologies in studying these and other primary sources (although the course will limit its scope to translated texts, students will become aware of the vast resources that are available in Arabic). Students will also learn the mechanics of research in the field. They will become aware of the Encyclopedias, Indexes, and Journals, etc., that are available to conduct proper research in the field. Formerly IWS 100.
 

IWS 192

WESTERN APPROACHES TO ISLAMIC STUDIES

This course is the second of two introductory courses to the Islamic World Studies Program. Students will concentrate on the state of the field of Islam in the Academic world. Students will become grounded in the history of the field, from its beginning in the late 18th century until the present time. Students will become familiar with the most up to date theories that are at present governing the study on the rise of Islam and the sacred texts in the Western and Islamic Academia. Formerly IWS 101.
 

IWS 217

ISLAM IN GLOBAL CONTEXTS

A study of Islam's developments in various global contexts, including Arabian beginnings, the Middle East, Central, Eastern and Western Europe, China, the former Soviet States and South Africa, with a focus on the impacts that these cultures and Islam have had on each other. Cross-listed as REL 217.
 

IWS 200

RESEARCH TOOLS

IWS 200 is a skills course aimed at improving the student's ability to read and write with clarity and precision. It is meant to prepare students for other IWS courses that stress text reading, responsive writing and research. IWS 200 students will use source material relevant to Islamic World Studies from disciplines that include religious studies, history, political science and international studies. The class meets once a week for three hours. The first 60-75 minutes of each session will be devoted to discussion of weekly reading assignments. Students will complete six short response papers as weekly homework assignments and three longer writing assignments: a book review, a comparative analysis and a research paper. Formerly IWS 190.
 

HST 141

THE MUSLIM WORLD, C. 600 CE TO 1100

Foundation of First Global Civilization (600-1100). A study of the emergence of Islam and the growth of the Islamic community from the time of the Prophet Muhammad until the end of the eleventh century. Formerly HST 223.
 

HST 142

THE MUSLIM WORLD, 1000-1500

Sultans, Khans and Shaykhs: Medieval Islamic History (1000-1500). A survey of Muslim history from the decline of the Arab caliphate to the rise of the great gunpowder empires, addressing themes of political expansion, military slavery, devastation brought about by the twin plagues of the Mongols and the Black Death, and the growth of Islamic mysticism. Formerly HST 224.
 

HST 143

THE MUSLIM WORLD, 1400-1920

Great Empires (1400-1920). Examines the social, cultural and economic histories of the Ottoman-Turkish, Safavid Iranian and Mughal-Indian empires which dominated the Muslim world in the crucial centuries between the end of the Mongol empire and the advent of European dominance. Formerly HST 225.
 

IWS 266

ISLAM IN THE UNITED STATES

An examination of the story of Islam in the United States in three historical periods: antebellum America, the first half of the 20th century, and the latter half of the 20th century. Explores Muslim slave life; the possibilities of retentions of Islam in slave culture; the religious, social/economic, and political life of Muslims at the beginning of the 20th century; the emergence of Islamic thought in the U.S. through an overview of the works of Ismail as-Faruqi, Seyyed Hossein Nasr and Fazlur Rahman. Cross listed as REL 266.
 

IWS 395

SENIOR CAPSTONE SEMINAR

This is a seminar for Islamic World Studies majors. It is both an opportunity to reflect on what has been gained from studies and experiences in Islamic studies and an opportunity to strengthen that learning and expand those experiences with direct contact with Muslim communities in Chicago and overseas through the Soliya Program. Students will meet with leaders and members of Chicago's Muslim communities and through Soliya meet with their peers in universities here and abroad. Soliya, through a partnership with the United Nations Alliance of civilizations aims to reduce tensions across cultural divides. This aspect of the course will be integrated throughout with the assistance of Jennifer Von Diehle, Assistant director for International Collaborations at DePaul.
 

ARB 101

BASIC ARABIC I

Listening to, speaking, reading and writing Arabic in a cultural context for the beginning student.
 

ARB 102

BASIC ARABIC II

Continued emphasis on the four skills in culturally authentic situations.
 

ARB 103

BASIC ARABIC III

Further work on the basic elements of the Arabic language, spoken as well as written, with due regard to the cultural context of Arabic expression.