Course Requirements

Core courses:  8 quarter hours

Intermediate Courses:  20 quarter hours

  • One Political Culture course (PSC 210 through 219)
  • One American Politics course  (PSC 220 through 229)
  • One Political Thought course  (PSC 230 through 239)
  • One International Relations course (PSC 240 through 249)
  • One Comparative Politics course (PSC 250 through 259)

Advanced courses:  16 quarter hours

  • Four courses from at least two of the following areas:
    • Methodology  (PSC 300 through 309)
    • Political Culture  (PSC 310 through 319)
    • American Politics  (PSC 320 through 329)
    • Political Thought  (PSC 330 through 339)
    • International Relations  (PSC 340 through 349)
    • Comparative Politics  (PSC 350 through 359)
    • Public Law  (PSC 360 through 369)
    • Civic Engagement  (PSC 380 through 389)

PSC electives:  12 quarter hours

  • Three additional PSC courses at the 200 or 300 level

Open Electives

Open elective credits are required in order to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours.  These courses are to be selected in consultation with the student's faculty adviser and may include courses in fields such as economics, history, English, sociology, etc.  Students may choose to use their open electives as part of a minor or to complete a double major.

Course Listing by Category

Methodology

Political Culture

American Politics

Political Thought

International Relations

Comparative Politics

Public Law

Experiential Politics

Advanced Study

PSC 120

THE AMERICAN POLITICAL SYSTEM

A survey of the national political system, including discussions of the political beliefs and behavior of citizens, the constitutional structure, and national political processes.

PSC 140

INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Three main themes are dealt with: the nature of power in the international political system, conflict and conflict resolution in the system, and the basis of national foreign policy decisions. Issues of current importance, such as the likelihood of global war, conflict between rich and poor nations, and East-West relations, provide the substantive material to illuminate these main themes.

PSC 150

INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS

This course focuses on the way in which political systems other than that of the United States operate. The common features of governments are identified and examined with special attention to such topics as political elites, political institutions, mass political behavior, political change and revolution. Examples are drawn from a wide range of political systems.

PSC 200

POLITICAL INQUIRY

This course analyses the types of questions asked in political science and explores various ways in which political scientists try to address them. It introduces the student to both approaches that are widely shared in the field and to major debates about theory and method.

PSC 201

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

An introductory-level course covering the fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Topics include GPS, remote sensing, data models (vector and raster), coordinate systems, and map design. Instruction is accomplished through lectures and hands-on computer lab exercises using ArcGIS. Cross listed with GEO 241.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) is a prerequisite for this course,

PSC 205

STATISTICS FOR THE SOCIAL SCIENCES

Data description and interpretation; table construction; correlation, regression and ANOVA; introduction to multivariate analysis; statistical inference and hypothesis testing. Cross-listed with SOC 279.
Prerequisites:
MAT 100 or higher or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

PSC 300

POLITICAL ANALYSIS AND RESEARCH

An introduction to the scientific method as applied in political science research. Among the topics covered are distinctions between normative and empirical statements, techniques for gathering data, basic data analysis, and interpretation of statistical results. This course is strongly recommended for students considering graduate study.

PSC 305

WRITING IN POLITICAL SCIENCE

Good writers intensively revise their work. This class will improve students' writing through instruction and revision. The course is intended for students intending to go to law or graduate school or who struggle with writing papers in political science.

PSC 213

POLITICAL SOCIALIZATION

This course considers the social institutions important for the political development of individuals. The political significance of institutions such as the family, the school and the work place will be examined. (Please note that the catalog number for this course was changed from PSC 219 to PSC 213 effective Autumn, 2001)

PSC 214

POLITICS AND MULTICULTURALISM

This course examines the theoretical and practical dilemmas facing multicultural societies, with special emphasis on the United States. Special attention is paid to questions of identity, integration, and separatism.

PSC 216

AMERICAN POLITICAL CULTURE

An examination of the shared symbol systems that provide meaning and structure for political life. Key historic cultural concepts, such as individualism, materialism and mobility will be considered, and their connections to contemporary popular culture explored.

PSC 217

WOMEN AND POLITICS

This course explores the ways in which women interpret, gain access to, and use political power. It focuses on sex- and gender-based differences in the political socialization process, and their implications for the participation and organization of women. Gender-related legislation and "women's'' political issues are also evaluated. Particular attention is given to women and politics in the United States.

PSC 218

AFRICAN-AMERICAN POLITICS

This course discusses the nature and scope of African-American politics. Major topics include the radical, liberal, moderate and conservative wings of African-American political discourse, the civil rights movement and its aftermath, the rise of African-American mayors, and presidential politics. An historical survey of African-American politics, and the factors that have shaped them, may also be included.

PSC 219

TOPICS IN POLITICAL CULTURE

The course focuses on specific themes or concerns in politics and culture. Variable topics.

PSC 310

POLITICAL CULTURE AND DEVELOPMENT

Examines the theoretical and empirical linkages between development and culture. Development remains a hotly contested concept, as its relationship with "culture," or the norms, customs, practices and institutions that govern social relations in a particular society. The relationship between culture and development poses significant challenges to students of international and comparative political economy, especially in an era of unprecedented globalization.

PSC 311

DIASPORAS AND GENDER

Explores the politics of gender and identity as they unfold in the movement and displacement of peoples from one nation-state to others. Focuses the role of women in the exit, transit, entrance and settlement of diaspora communities. Questions are raised about the place of women in the family; labor markets, and in the construction of identities. The broader dilemmas of displacement, cultural conflict, destruction and reconstruction of identities as well as the role of memory are explored through critical readings of literary texts.

PSC 312

CREATING CHANGE: CONTEMPORARY GAY, LESBIAN, BISEXUAL & TRANSGENDERED POLITICS (CROSS-LST W/ WMS 332)

Explore the historical roots and contemporary realities of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered (GLBT) politics, nationally and internationally. Such issues as hate crimes, marriage, AIDS, and ballot initiatives over non-discrimination law and policy have entered the political mainstream since the 1970's. This course examines the GLBT movement, its political and social strategies, conflicts and issues, and the political roles played by its members as participants in political culture. (cross-list with WMS 332)

PSC 319

ADVANCED TOPICS IN POLITICAL CULTURE

Various topics in political cultures.

PSC 220

THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY

An examination of the structure of the presidency, its relationship to other political and social institutions, and the way in which that office is shaped by individual presidents.

PSC 221

CONGRESS AND THE LEGISLATIVE PROCESS

This course provides an analysis of congressional elections, the structure and operation of the United States Congress, the behavior of its members, and the relationship of the Congress to interest groups, the public, the President and the bureaucracy.

PSC 222

POLITICAL PARTIES AND ELECTIONS

The course explores the changing nature and function of political parties in the United States, factors that affect individual and aggregate vote choice, and the electoral process.

PSC 223

URBAN POLITICS

Communities running the gamut from small towns through urban neighborhoods to big cities are examined with reference to their structures of government, systems of political influence, and public policy issues.

PSC 224

BUREAUCRACY AND POLITICS

This course examines the ways that administrative organizations participate in and influence the policy-making process and the common forms of politics within bureaucracies.

PSC 225

STATE POLITICS

The formal structures of government and political behavior found among the fifty states and their local subdivisions are surveyed.

PSC 229

TOPICS IN AMERICAN POLITICS

This course discusses selected topics in American politics.

PSC 320

DYNAMICS OF PUBLIC POLICY

Competing theories of policy formulation and the application of these theories to current policy contexts. Problems of policy implementation will be considered.

PSC 321

MASS MEDIA AND AMERICAN POLITICS

The rise, fall and manipulation of public opinion and voting behavior, with special attention given to the mass media.

PSC 322

URBAN POLICYMAKING

U.S. urban policy is examined from the standpoints of program objectives, the mechanics of their evaluation, and the barriers to their effective implementation.

PSC 323

CHICAGO GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

The particular socioeconomic characteristics of Chicago are linked with its formal government structure, informal political style, and prominent public issues. To enhance this analysis, comparisons with other U.S. cities are employed.

PSC 324

INEQUALITY IN AMERICAN SOCIETY

This course examines the nature and extent of inequality in American society and explores various psychological, political, social, and economic theories which attempt to explain the existence of this phenomenon.

PSC 325

LATINO POLITICAL EMPOWERMENT

An in-depth, critical examination of the politics and identity of Latinos in the United States. Major topics include the emergence of Latino communities, the political economy of Latino communities, and institutions and processes of contemporary Latino politics.

PSC 326

AGENDA SETTING AND PUBLIC POLICY

This course examines theories of agenda setting and decision making in public policy. It offers empirical and theoretical analyses of linkages between the rise and fall of issues from the agendas of the United States Congress, President, media, interest groups, and public opinion.

PSC 327

PUBLIC OPINION

An in-depth look into how individuals form opinions, how researchers attempt to measure attitudes, what the public thinks about a variety of social and public policy issues, and the role that public opinion plays in American society, politics and our notions of democracy.

PSC 328

ADVANCED TOPICS IN AMERICAN POLITICS

Advanced topics In American politics.

PSC 329

ADVANCED TOPICS IN PUBLIC POLICY

Advanced Topics In Public Policy.

PSC 230

CLASSICAL POLITICAL THOUGHT

Political thought of the ancient, medieval and early modern period including Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, St. Thomas, and Machiavelli.

PSC 231

MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT

Political thought of the modern period including Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hume, Burke, Mill, and Marx.

PSC 233

POLITICAL IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES

An introduction to the enduring political issues confronted by major theorists and political traditions. (Please note that the catalog number for this course was changed from PSC 203 to PSC 233 effective Autumn, 2001.)

PSC 234

FREEDOM AND EMPOWERMENT

Considers different models for the distribution of power including forms of classic and modern elitism and representative and democratic theories. Explores issues of citizenship, community, participation, representation and constitutionalism. The dynamic of inclusion and exclusion within society are addressed as well as theories that point to political, economic, and cultural liberation.

PSC 235

EQUALITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

Considers how societies distribute social goods of power, status, wealth, and informal resources and models of just distribution utilized in classic and modern political theory. Shifts in the meaning of social justice over the course of history and the critical contests over this issue are addressed, as well as the emergence of new models focusing on regional and global concerns. The major concepts including capitalism, socialism and meritocracy are considered.

PSC 236

LEGITIMACY AND CRISIS

Considers how states achieve validation with their members and maintain that validation through such mechanisms as socialization, education, information flow, civil religion, and war. Theories of social crisis that challenge regime legitimacy are considered as well as issues of revolution, counterrevolution, and regime stabilization.

PSC 239

TOPICS IN POLITICAL THOUGHT

Variable topics.

PSC 330

AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT

An examination of the enduring problems of American political thought from colonial time to the present, including puritanism, constitutionalism, Calhoun, populism, socialism, Social Darwinism, and pragmatism.

PSC 331

CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THOUGHT

An intensive seminar discussion of selected political and social thought of contemporary significance drawn from main currents of liberalism, conservatism, socialism, fascism, anarchism, and existentialism.

PSC 333

MARXISM

An analysis of Marxist political and economic thought as represented by the writings of Marx, Lenin, Trotsky, Lukacs, Sartre. Primary texts will be examined, and their application to the contemporary setting considered.

PSC 334

LATIN AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT

An historical survey of important themes in political thinking in Latin America. The readings draw upon literature and the writings of political actors and theorists.

PSC 335

THEORIES OF THE CHURCH

This course deals with the theological, social, and political implications of ecclesiology, or "theories of the church". Students will explore ideas about the origins and purposes of the Church, notions of authority and membership, matters of church and state, and more. The impact of Marxist, feminist, and conservative ideologies on understandings of the church may also be explored. The course will integrate theological, sociological, and political methods of analysis. Cross-listed as CTH 209.

PSC 336

AFRICAN-AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT

Considers black political thought through a variety of ideological, political, legal and historical perspectives. First explores early efforts by blacks to challenge the racialized limitations of America's core principles of liberty, equality and democracy in the contexts of abolitionism, the women's suffrage movements, Manifest Destiny, and American industrialism. Then concentrates on the evolution of contemporary black political thought, with an emphasis on both conceptual diversity and continuity over time.

PSC 337

CHRISTIAN POLITICAL THOUGHT

An exploration of key themes, thinkers and movements in the Christian tradition's engagement with power, governance, authority, and allegiance. Students explore scriptural and early church sources, important pre-modern theologians like Augustine and Aquinas, Reformation figures including Luther and Calvin, and contemporary philosophers, theologians and topics.

PSC 338

POLITICS AND LITERATURE

This course investigates themes in politics through the perspective of major works of literature. The emphasis is on the ways in which writers utilize the imaginative process to represent and investigate the working of society, culture, the individual, the public and private realms, and relationships in order to convey a complex understanding of political values and processes in their eras.

PSC 339

ADVANCED TOPICS IN POLITICAL THOUGHT

Advanced topics in political thought.

PSC 242

AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY

An examination of the forces that shape the broad outlines of United States foreign policy, including historical background, and the effects of social forces and governmental structures. The challenges, opportunities and constraints presented by the international environment are also considered.

PSC 243

RUSSIAN FOREIGN POLICY

This course will probe the institutions, objectives and techniques which are reflected in contemporary Russian external policy. Economic, military and cultural dimensions will augment the primarily political focus of the course. One segment of this course examines Russian - American relations today.

PSC 244

LATIN AMERICAN-UNITED STATES RELATIONS

This course analyzes the dual thrust of Latin American foreign relations: toward autonomy and "third world" nationalism on the one hand, and interdependence and integration on the other. The course analyzes the background of Latin American-United States relations in the 20th century, and also gives attention to the new relationships and issues emerging among Latin American states.

PSC 245

FOREIGN POLICIES OF WESTERN EUROPE

This course examines the content and domestic and international contexts of the foreign policies of Western European nations, NATO, and the European Union.

PSC 246

ASIAN FOREIGN POLICY

This course surveys the international relations of selected Asian countries. For each country, the course presents the basic historical background shaping foreign relations, introduces the external and domestic influences on foreign policy, and identifies emerging international challenges. It examines both the economic and military-security dimensions of Asian foreign relations.

PSC 249

TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

This course discusses selected topics in the area of international relations.

PSC 340

THE EUROPEAN UNION

This course examines the history, institutional structures and processes, and policies of the EU. It will look at how the EU is unique, sharing characteristics of states and of international organizations.

PSC 342

ARMS, SECURITY, AND WAR

Focus is on the military dimensions of international politics, such as nuclear and conventional deterrence, arms races, arms control, alliances, and American defense policy, and how those affect war and peace.

PSC 344

WORLD POLITICAL ECONOMY

Political conflicts over trade relations, global inequality, development, growth, inflation, and scarcity are analyzed, with special emphasis placed on a description of the institutions and processes that shape international economics.

PSC 345

THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN WORLD POLITICS

This course seeks to familiarize students with major theories, research traditions, and issues regarding the role of Catholicism in the contemporary world. It will assess the role of various levels and actors with the Church--the Vatican, priests and nuns, lay groups and movements, activists, and others--in working as forces of social change/stability in matters of world politics, economics, and culture. The course will also consider the impact of globalization and other transnational processes on the activities and options of Catholic institutions and actors.

PSC 346

THE UNITED NATIONS AND WORLD PROBLEMS

This course will examine the historical and theoretical foundations of the United Nations, particularly in light of the changing problems and issues that confront the global community, such as international peace and security, global economic inequality, and environmental and human rights norms.

PSC 347

ETHICS IN WORLD POLITICS

Drawing on general theories of international relations and historical cases, this course examines both the forces that inhibit the development and effectiveness of ethical norms at the international level and the conditions under which such norms develop and affect the behavior of states and other actors.

PSC 349

ADVANCED TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Advanced topics in international relations.

PSC 250

WEST EUROPEAN POLITICS

An overview of select Western European political and economic systems (including those of Britain, France and Germany); examination of the European Union and relations between Western Europe and the international community.

PSC 251

RUSSIAN POLITICS

This course offers an overview of the fundamental premises, structures and political developments in Russia. Special attention is given to issues of transition from Communism to the new reality, and the emphasis is on contemporary politics. Key issues include the place of the military, economic and business patterns, health, education, and gender.

PSC 252

LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS

An examination of the history of Latin America and the major institutions, social sectors, and actors that shape the political life of the region. The course focuses on the development of revolutionary regimes and movements as well as military regimes and their demise during the transition to democracy.

PSC 253

ASIAN POLITICS

An introduction to contemporary government and politics in Asia, focusing on China and Japan, with comparative reference to other Asian and non-Asian political systems. Special attention will be made to the emerging political and economic role of the Pacific Rim.

PSC 254

AFRICAN POLITICS

An introduction to African politics. The course will focus on the basic concepts, issues, and theoretical models used in studies of the dynamics of government and politics in Africa from the precolonial era to the contemporary period.

PSC 255

MIDDLE EAST POLITICS

This course explores contemporary political issues in the Middle East. It includes country profiles, a review of the Arab-Israeli conflict, analysis of opposing viewpoints about the revival of Islam and about Islamic fundamentalism, and the region's position in the emerging new world order.

PSC 256

SOUTHEAST ASIAN POLITICS

A comparative examination of political institutions, processes, and contemporary problems in select countries such as Laos, Kampuchea, Burma, and Thailand. Issues such as insurgency, modernization, democracy, and political development are featured.

PSC 259

COUNTRY STUDIES

Intensive study of the politics of one foreign nation.

PSC 351

REVOLUTION AND TERRORISM

Aspects of revolution, emphasizing contemporary cases, including units on ideology, leaders, followers, organization, techniques, weapons, causes and theories of revolution.

PSC 353

COMPARATIVE DEMOCRACY AND DICTATORSHIP

This course compares democracies and dictatorships in order to ascertain how they differ and what are the requisite conditions for each type of political system. Among the concepts to be examined are elections, participation, distribution of resources, corruption, and transparency.

PSC 354

POLITICAL REPRESENTATION IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE

A comparative treatment of those processes and institutions that comprise the representative system, including executives, legislatures, political parties, coalitions, and elections.

PSC 355

STATE AND NATION BUILDING

This course examines the origin, nature and strategies of state formation in general, with particular emphasis on African state processes.

PSC 356

ETHNIC CONFLICT IN THE THIRD WORLD

This course examines the nature, causes, and consequences of ethnic conflict in "Third World" nations, including conflict resolution in the presence of ethnic and racial cleavages.

PSC 357

EASTERN EUROPE IN TRANSITION

This course covers the causes of the "democratic'' revolutions in 1989 and the processes of change in Eastern Europe as those countries transform from Soviet-model political systems to other forms of politics. The course will cover economic and social developments within those nations as well as relevant changes in their international environments.

PSC 358

GLOBAL GENDER ISSUES

This course examines how inequalities between women and men are connected to the global politics of power, security, the political economy, and ecology. It focuses on the theoretical and practical linkages between "women's issues" and political matters such as wars of secession, arms proliferation, global economic recessions, and environmental degradation. Questions of the nature of power, abuses of human rights, the human costs of global inequality, and the meaning of a just world order are explored.

PSC 359

ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS

Advanced topics in comparative politics.

PSC 260

LAW AND THE POLITICAL SYSTEM

An examination of the American judicial system with special attention to the role of the Supreme Court in American politics, the personnel of the American legal system, the problem of crime and the nature of the criminal justice system, and selected issues in constitutional law, including discrimination, privacy, family life, and freedom of speech, press, assembly and religion.

PSC 261

FIRST AMENDMENT RIGHTS

A discussion and analysis of Supreme Court decisions interpreting the meaning of the First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech, press, assembly and religion.

PSC 262

RIGHTS OF DEFENDANTS

A discussion and analysis of Supreme Court decisions interpreting the meaning of the phrase "due process of law'' and the various specific provisions protecting the rights of criminal defendants.

PSC 263

EQUAL PROTECTION OF THE LAWS

A discussion and analysis of Supreme Court decisions interpreting the meaning of the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment and resolving issues of race and sex discrimination, school segregation, and the status of indigents in American law.

PSC 269

TOPICS IN PUBLIC LAW

This course discusses selected topics in the area of public law.

PSC 361

INTERNATIONAL LAW

The nature, sources, and applications of international law in the international community, including issues of recognition, territory, jurisdiction, settlement of international disputes, diplomatic agents, intervention and the use of force.

PSC 362

THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

An overview of the important features of the American criminal justice system, including the role of police, courts and corrections. The course analyzes conventional and alternative definitions of crime and explanations for criminal behavior. An examination of race and class issues as they relate to criminal justice, and their implications for public policy, is also included.

PSC 363

WOMEN AND THE LAW

This course investigates the variety of ways in which women come into relation with the law, focusing on laws and judicial decisions dealing with equal opportunity. Cross-listed as WGS 326.

PSC 364

COMPARATIVE PROTECTION OF INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS

This course will compare the status of individual rights in Britain, the United States, and Canada, and under the European Convention on Human Rights. Course materials will consist of judicial decisions and other materials on specific areas of civil liberties.

PSC 365

VOTING RIGHTS AND THE LAW

Explores the legal and political struggles of two originally disenfranchised groups-women and African Americans-to gain access to the ballot, and what their struggles reveal about American law, politics and society. This course is also intended to familiarize students with dominant legal theories, as well as introduce them to alternative approaches such as Critical Race Theory and Critical Feminist Theory. The readings include Supreme Court opinions, legal theories of voting rights jurisprudence, political theories of representation, and historical narratives.

PSC 366

NATIONAL SECURITY AND THE U.S. CONSTITUTION

Explores the relationship between the U.S. Constitution and the government's responsibility for the protection of national security. The course examines the constitutional doctrine of separation of powers and the respective roles of Congress, the President, and the courts in the conduct of foreign policy and the use of military force. It also examines the relationship between national security and protection of various rights, including freedom of speech, freedom of the press, privacy, and personal liberty.

PSC 367

IMMIGRATION LAW

Examines the various legal categories under the U.S. Immigration and Nationality Act that permits persons to be admitted to the United States either temporarily or permanently. It also examines U.S. policies toward illegal immigration and the rights of aliens after the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

PSC 369

ADVANCED TOPICS IN PUBLIC LAW

Advanced topics in public law.

PSC 282

POLITICAL ACTION AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

This course combines community-based service learning with readings, lectures and classroom discussions to investigate the nature of social justice and the extent to which individual and community political action can promote it. (Please note that the catalog number for this course was changed from PSC 396 to PSC 282 effective Autumn, 2001.)

PSC 284

MOCK TRIAL: CIVIL LAW

Mock Trial is a co-curricular activity involving intercollegiate competitive simulation of court cases. This course is taught by attorneys and gives students a chance to learn first hand about the work of trial attorneys, understand the judicial system, examine the anatomy of the litigation process, develop critical thinking skills, enhance their communication skills, and participate in simulated trial experiences. Students will learn and practice the basic elements of trial advocacy, including opening statements, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, objections, and closing arguments. PSC 284 focuses on civil law, cases, and procedures.

PSC 285

MOCK TRIAL: CRIMINAL LAW

Mock Trial is a co-curricular activity involving intercollegiate competitive simulation of court cases. This course is taught by attorneys and gives students a chance to learn first hand about the work of trial attorneys, understand the judicial system, examine the anatomy of the litigation process, develop critical thinking skills, enhance their communication skills, and participate in simulated trial experiences. Students will learn and practice the basic elements of trial advocacy, including opening statements, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, objections, and closing arguments. PSC 285 focuses on criminal law, cases, and procedures.

PSC 286

CAMPAIGNS AND SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT

This course examines political campaigns and participation in the United States, the role of civic engagement in a representative and democratic political system, and the ethics of political campaigns. Students engage in an experiential project including participation in a political organization.

PSC 288

BIKING, POLITICS AND POLICY

This class focuses on biking, politics and transportation policy. Through reading, riding, and reflection, students will examine and experience policies that generate bike friendliness. They will also meet with political actors and interest groups that contribute to continuing policy development. The bike's potential contribution to a green future and to alleviating the political problems of allocating scarce finite resources will also be assessed.

PSC 289

GROUP INTERNSHIP SPECIAL TOPIC

Various internships.

PSC 381

THEORY AND PRACTICE OF PUBLIC POLICY

This course provides an understanding of the public policy process and integrates classroom learning with developments in our community. Volunteer service in an off-campus organization or agency working on a public policy issue is required as part of the course.

PSC 299

SPECIAL TOPICS

SPECIAL TOPICS

PSC 390

CAPSTONE SEMINAR

Senior capstone seminar.
Prerequisites:
Senior standing is a prerequisite for this class.

PSC 392

INTERNSHIP

By arrangement.

PSC 393

HONORS SEMINAR

Variable credit.

PSC 394

SENIOR THESIS

Variable credit.

PSC 395

TRAVEL/STUDY

By arrangement with sponsoring faculty, foreign and domestic tours or residence programs may be combined with lectures, readings, and research assignments. Variable credit.

PSC 399

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Variable credit.

PSC 232

LIBERALISM, CONSERVATISM, AND DEMOCRACY

This course seeks to give students a solid underpinning on which they can understand liberalism and conservatism and in turn sharpen their own arguments while gaining an appreciation for those held by others. The goal is to gain a better philosophical understanding of politics but also to see the political relevance of philosophical thinking.

PSC 247

U.S. - AFRICA RELATIONS

This course examines the foreign policy of the United States toward Africa. The course focuses on the historical, civilizational, political, economic, ideological and strategic forces that shape U.S.-Africa relations over time.

PSC 315

INTERNET, TECHNOLOGY AND POLITICS

This course explores the evolving relationships that reside at the intersection of the internet and politics. Some of the themes covered in this course include the ways in which politicians and organizations use the internet, and how the internet is changing the relationship between governments and citizens.

PSC 326

IDEOLOGY, ECONOMICS AND POLICY

This course examines the economic theories and political ideologies behind the policies advocated by the major political parties in America. The course also examines the social and economic consequences of policies advocated by Democratic and Republican Administrations.