​The combined Bachelor's/Master's degree programs allow students to complete 12 graduate credit hours while still undergraduates. These three graduate level courses will count toward both the undergraduate and graduate degree programs.

The Writing, Rhetoric and Discourse (BA) offers two options:

  • Writing, Rhetoric and Discourse (BA)/Writing, Rhetoric and Discourse (MA)
  • Writing, Rhetoric and Discourse (BA)/Secondary Education English (MED) 

​Writing, Rhetoric and Discourse (BA)/Writing, Rhetoric and Discourse (MA)

Writing, Rhetoric, & Discourse offers undergraduate majors the opportunity to begin earning an advanced degree as seniors.  The program allows approved B.A./M.A. students to take one graduate course in each quarter of the senior year, allowing for the completion of the M.A. in nine subsequent graduate courses rather than 12.  Applicants must have a minimum GPA of 3.50 in the major and 3.20 overall at time of application, and they should have completed two of the undergraduate Core courses and at least one other 300-level course counting toward the major.  Students must apply for this program no later than March 1 of their junior year.   

​Writing, Rhetoric and Discourse (BA)/Secondary Education English (MED)

The TEACH Program combines a Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (LAS) undergraduate English major with a graduate level College of Education (COE) Master’s in Education Program.  Students graduate with a BA in Writing, Rhetoric and Discourse and a MEd in Education with State of Illinois Secondary English Language Arts licensure.  This combined degree program of the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences and the College of Education was collaboratively developed, and is governed and taught by faculty from these units.

Students may apply to the Program during the spring of their junior year.  They must complete the Junior Year Experiential Learning course, TCH 320, and meet other application criteria prior to applying; these include completion of at least 16 quarter credit hours at DePaul and a 3.0 GPA.  During their senior year, students are required to complete a Program capstone course, TCH 390and three 400-level courses that count toward both their undergraduate and graduate degrees:

​English  Content Area (grades of C or better required for licensure):
The following English content area requirements are required.  These can be taken as part of liberal studies, major and/or open elective requirements:

The Master’s year comprises teacher-preparation coursework that culminates with student teaching during Spring quarter.  Upon graduation and the fulfilling of State of Illinois Certification requirements (which may require some additional course work in the student’s major and related fields), students are eligible to be certified to teach English at the 6th-12th grade levels. 
 
A full description of the Program can be found on the College of Education website in the graduate course catalog.  Students interested in the Program should consult with the designated TEACH Program advisor in their home department. 

 

  

 

 
 

 

TCH 320

EXPLORING TEACHING IN THE URBAN HIGH SCHOOL

(JYEL CREDIT) This course is an invitation to secondary education as a profession, an opportunity for students considering education as a career to explore the reality of teaching and learning a disciplinary content area in a variety of Chicago-area schools. Students will become familiar with different narratives of teaching through teacher and student biographies, testimonials, literature, film, and classroom observations. They will explore the interrelationships between, for example, popular cultural beliefs about schooling; teacher and student identities; and classroom interaction. The instructor will coordinate observations in several classrooms as the basis for intensive, guided reflective work, aimed at supporting students' initial and subsequent efforts of developing identities as disciplinary content educators (25 hours of high school classroom observation required). Course is also an introduction to the TEACH Program. Offered during Fall, Winter, and Spring terms.

TCH 390

CAPSTONE: INTEGRATING EDUCATION & DISCIPLINARY FOUNDATIONS

This course is designed to help students conceptualize issues and opportunities in teaching their disciplinary content to diverse students and in different classroom contexts. Up to ten hours of community-based service/observation required. In this course, students will analyze and reflect on how teaching in their disciplines is informed by diverse cultures of schooling and youth, including the influences of economic, social, cultural, political, gender, and religious factors on schooling, educational policy and opportunity. Students will use disciplinary content to critically and creatively reflect on the teaching of that content in secondary schools. Students will be introduced to issues and ways of presenting essential disciplinary content in ways that engage diverse learners, including learners who have not been served well by formal education. Students will also develop a theory of teaching that emphasizes the intersection of disciplinary content with multicultural perspectives. Offered during Spring term only.

TCH 401

TEACHING AS A PROFESSION IN SECONDARY SCHOOL

This course is an introduction to the TEACH Program, including the College of Education's conceptual framework and teacher dispositions, and to the professional world of secondary school teaching, including the policy bodies and stakeholders that impact teaching. Within this developing understanding of the larger context of secondary education, students will begin to articulate clearly professional identities and the behaviors inherent in those identities, including their impact on student learning. Drawing on previous coursework and their growing understanding of differences in individual, ethnic, and cultural group attitudes, values, and needs, students also will learn to recognize the complexities of teaching and learning in a pluralistic society. Ultimately, students will be committed to teaching as a responsible professional who acts in an ethical and collegial fashion. 25 Level 2 field experience required. Offered during Fall term only.

TCH 411

THE NATURE OF ENGLISH

This course is designed to help students to see that the field of English Studies is bigger than the component they probably identify as English (it's Literature, Writing, and Linguistics/Grammar). Students will explore the formation of the discipline up to the current day, focusing on the shifting understanding of ways of reading, writing and thinking about language. They will strive to answer the questions: "What does it mean to be a student of language and literature?" and, "What are the ways of knowing characteristic of English and Writing, Rhetoric, & Discourse majors?" In doing so, students will relate the disciplinary content of their major to their daily lives and interests and to the larger framework of human endeavor and understanding, including identifying its importance to the personal lives of high school students. The course is a prerequisite for TCH 421. Offered during Winter term only.

TCH 421

INQUIRY & APPLICATION IN DEVELOPING SECONDARY ENGLISH PEDAGOGY

This course builds on TCH 411 by preparing teacher candidates to distinguish between what needs to be taught (content) and how it is taught (pedagogy), with an emphasis on understanding the historical shifts in the teaching of content and how these shifts inform teaching and learning in today's English language arts classrooms. The course also introduces students to methods of inquiry and reflection on content pedagogical knowledge. Student will examine their own educational experience through the lens of the historical trends, focusing on how they learned and what they understood their teachers to be doing. This initial case study will serve as an introduction into case study methods. Students will also develop expertise in one of the three historical trend areas -reading, writing, and language - and examine how the trend has informed teaching and learning and shaped curriculum, pedagogy, and assessment. Students will develop a case study of a practicing teacher using the lens of the historical trend in which they are developing expertise. 25 Level 1 Field Experience hours required. Offered during Spring term.

ENG 120

READING LITERATURE

Study of the elements and construction of literary texts, of the vocabulary of literary criticism, and of various literary modes and genres. WRD 103 or HON 100 is recommended.
Prerequisites:
WRD 103 or HON 100 is a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 220

READING POETRY

A comprehensive introduction to English and American poetry, poetic forms and meters, and the vocabulary of poetic study.
Prerequisites:
WRD 103 or HON 100 is a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 366

MODERN POETRY

Twentieth-century English and American Poetry.
Prerequisites:
A literature course is a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 228

INTRODUCING SHAKESPEARE

Introduction to the basic structures and conventions of representative plays by William Shakespeare, emphasizing film and stage interpretations. May not be taken by students who have completed ENG 328, Shakespeare.
Prerequisites:
WRD 103 or HON 100 is a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 328

SHAKESPEARE

Study of selected plays and poetry of William Shakespeare in relation to early modern English culture.
Prerequisites:
Advanced Standing in English (ENG 220 and ENG 221) is a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 221

READING PROSE

An introduction to close analytical reading of the fundamental prose genres that students will encounter in the English major, for example short stories, novels, folktales, literary nonfiction, and criticism. Students will study examples drawn from the history of prose as well as contemporary narrative.
Prerequisites:
WRD 103 or HON 100 is a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 211

ENGLISH STUDIES: LANGUAGE AND STYLE

An introduction to elements of the linguistic structure of English as they are employed to create stylistic effects in writing. The course aims at clarifying ways that language can affect audiences' perceptions and responses to writing.
Prerequisites:
WRD 104 or HON 100 is a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 370

HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

Examination of the development of vocabulary and structure of English from its beginnings to contemporary British and American English usage.
Prerequisites:
WRD 104 or HON 100 is a prerequisite for this course.

WRD 203

STYLE FOR WRITERS

This course provides students with opportunities to explore stylistic choices in written prose. Students will examine both published work and their own writing to explore how to manipulate language in specific contexts to achieve specific ends. Writing workshops will help students provide and receive constructive comments aimed at revision of drafts.

ENG 300

COMPOSITION AND STYLE

Advanced instruction in invention, arrangement, and style, toward developing clear and effective prose styles.
Prerequisites:
WRD 104 or HON 100 is a prerequisite for this course.

WRD 300

COMPOSITION AND STYLE

Advanced instruction in invention, arrangement, and style, toward developing clear and effective prose styles.
Prerequisites:
WRD 104 or HON 100 is a prerequisite for this course.

WRD 323

EDITING

Students will explore a range of practices associated with the revision of prose for publication. Students will learn to edit for style and consistency at the document, paragraph, and sentence levels. They will also compare and learn to apply differing style guides, learn technologies central to modern editorial practice, and examine related topics such as the Plain Language Movement and preparing documents for translation.

WRD 340

WRITING AND REVISING

This course operates on the assumption that the secret to strong writing is revision. Students will learn about theories of revision, studying how successful writers revise, and will then put those techniques into practice. The goal of the course is to develop strategies and understanding of the rhetorical situations of writing in different contexts. Students will work on developing voice, taking ownership of work, and creating strong, well supported arguments.

ENG 245

THE BRITISH NOVEL

Introduction to the historical development, literary forms, and intellectual scope of the British novel from 1700 to the present. Key topics include the representation of gender, class, and empire.
Prerequisites:
WRD 103 or HON 100 is a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 382

MAJOR AUTHORS

Study of one or two major writers. May be repeated on different authors. See schedule for current offerings.
Prerequisites:
A literature course is a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 383

WOMEN AND LITERATURE

Study of literature by women, with attention to the literary traditions of women's literature, historical and theoretical perspectives on women as writers and readers, and issues of feminist literary history and criticism.
Prerequisites:
A literature course is a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 387

TOPICS IN CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE

This course focuses on selected late twentieth- and twenty-first century literary works, authors, and movements.

ENG 389

TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

See schedule for current offerings.
Prerequisites:
WRD 104 or HON 100 is a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 388

TOPICS IN TRANSATLANTIC LITERATURE

This course focuses on transatlantic or circum-atlantic literary production and consumption.

ENG 361

AMERICAN LITERATURE 1830 TO 1865

Survey of American literature from 1830 to 1865.
Prerequisites:
Advanced Standing in English (ENG 220 and ENG 221) is a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 371

AFRICAN-AMERICAN FICTION

Selected novels and short fiction by twentieth-century African-American writers.
Prerequisites:
A literature course is a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 372

AFRICAN-AMERICAN POETRY AND DRAMA

Survey of African-American poetry and drama from 1865 to the present.
Prerequisites:
A literature course is a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 373

MULTIETHNIC LITERATURE OF THE U.S.

Readings in recent literature, primarily fiction, by American writers of various ethnic backgrounds, exploring the evolving concept of ethnicity in literature.
Prerequisites:
A literature course is a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 374

NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE

Study of literature by Native-American writers with emphasis on twentieth-century works.
Prerequisites:
A literature course is a prerequisite for this course.