Course Requirements

Internship Credit

Students in the major may take CMN 394 Advanced Communication Internship or CMN 395 Communication Internship (when placement relates to the major) for credit. In order to take CMN 394 or CMN 395, students must have completed the three communication core courses (CMN 101, CMN 102, and CMN 103) and have fulfilled internship program eligibility requirements.

Open Electives

Open elective credit also is required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours. 

INTC 220

PUBLIC SPEAKING

Introduction to the skills required in a variety of public speaking settings. Includes units on delivery, language, defining speech purposes and content, finding supporting material, organization, and audience analysis. Students will be required to present speeches. Background in basic writing and library skills is necessary. (Formerly CMNS 220)

INTC 230

PERFORMANCE OF LITERATURE

Introduction to the communication of literature through oral interpretation. Involves critical analyses of selected literary works and preparation for and delivery of short performances. (Formerly CMNS 230)

INTC 322

ADVANCED PUBLIC SPEAKING (Formerly CMNS 322)

Analyzes theories and develops skills required in persuasive speaking situations. This course is an extension of the public speaking class (INTC 220) and explores in greater detail than the first course the analysis of audiences, sources of resistance to persuasion, and appropriate logical and psychological strategies for persuasive speeches. (Formerly CMNS 322)
Prerequisites:
CMNS 220 is a prerequisite for this class.

INTC 330

TOPICS IN PERFORMANCE

Advanced study in performance focusing on a specific genre each quarter such as: Poetry, Fiction, Nonfiction, Drama or Chamber Theater. Other possibilities include: performing autobiography; life performances; ritual, ceremony, and storytelling; and radio and television performances. (Formerly CMNS 330)

INTC 367

PERFORMANCE FOR SOCIAL CHANGE

This is an experiential field experience that examines the role of performance in social activism. Student projects will identify a social issue of critical concerns and devise a performative response. (Formerly CMNS 367)

CMN 394

ADVANCED COMMUNICATION INTERNSHIP

This course is for communication majors and minors who meet eligibility requirements. Students will learn career planning skills, explore the organizations in which they work, gain an understanding of how they contributed to their organizations, and discuss societal and world issues, as they affect their workplaces. Students are required to work 10 hours per week while enrolled in the course. Students must cmplete the Communication Internship orientation workshop. Students registering for a hybrid section must also attend five 2-hour class meetings.

CMN 395

COMMUNICATION INTERNSHIP SPECIAL TOPICS

This course is for students who wish to receive academic credit for a second or third internship. Must be a Communication major or minor who has completed CMN 394 or ISP250 and meets eligibility requirements. Must be taken concurrently with an internship. Topics include building and managing a communication career, effective networking, and leadership development.

INTC 205

COMMUNICATION, CULTURE AND COMMUNITY

Examines the relationships among culture, communication, institutions, and public and private life. Students explore the possibilities and problems of contemporary forms of community through service in community organizations. The course also fulfills the junior year experiential learning requirement through community based service learning. (Formerly CMNS 205)

INTC 206

COMMUNICATING MULTICULTURAL IDENTITIES

This course examines identity from a critical/poststructuralist position, approaching the notion of identity as a performative and discursive production within complex systems of power, privilege, and oppression. Together, the class will examine the ways in which discourse influences our performances of personal identity as well as the ways that it constructs our ideas about other identities (gender, race, sexuality, etc.). Through reading, discussion, and reflection, we will interrogate how individual and group identities are theorized, constructed, negotiated, and transformed; how identity is shaped by rhetorical discursive and non-discursive practices; and how identity construction is situated in historical/social/political/ideological contexts. (Formerly CMNS 206)

INTC 290

COMMUNICATION WORKSHOP (VARIABLE TOPICS)

This course allows students to sample a range of hands on, practical offerings in communication that can enhance their knowledge and expertise. Topics offered include survey design and focus groups. (Formerly CMNS 290)

INTC 304

MULTICULTURAL COMMUNICATION IN THE U.S.A. (Formerly CMN 304)

An examination of communication within and between linguistic communities in the United States. Focus will be on the relations between language use and social institutions such as the family, the community, the media, and the educational system. (Formerly CMN 304)

INTC 307

TOPICS IN POLITICAL AND SOCIAL COMMUNICATION

Examines intensively one or more issues in the Culture and Communication Track. The topics differ each term focusing on a particular area of discourse such as environmental communication, political communication, and sexuality and communication. (Formerly CMNS 307)

INTC 308

TOPICS IN INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION

Examination of the application of linguistic and rhetorical theories to various specializations in cultural discourse. The course focuses each term on one particular area such as semiotics, language acquisition, or language and power. (Formerly CMNS 308)

INTC 309

INTERNATIONAL/GLOBAL COMMUNICATION

Focuses on the world of international/global news flow and media systems in a comparative manner. Emphasizes changes that have followed the modernization of the media, the impact of globalization on individual countries, attempts to preserve the cultural character of domestic media content in the face of increased amounts of imported products, and the effects of new communication technologies, particularly the Internet. (Formerly CMNS 309)

INTC 310

DISCOURSE ANALYSIS

An analytical examination of the ways in which people locate meaning cooperate, coordinate, and find coherency in conversations and in other forms of discourse, both spoken and written. The class will analyze and disclose meanings hidden in public discourse. (Formerly CMNS 310)

INTC 321

CULTURAL AND SYMBOLIC CRITICISM

Introduction to the critical methodologies of rhetorical analysis. Students are instructed in ways to become more reflective consumers of discourse by examining how rhetoric instructs reality, shapes the social and political agenda and engages questions of ethics, power and persuasion. The course promotes a critical awareness of the role symbols play in influencing human perception, attitude, and action in a diverse culture. (Formerly CMNS 321)

INTC 323

SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

This course examines the rhetoric of social movements throughout American History. As a rhetoric class, the focus is primarily on the symbolic creation of movements in order to provide background of the political and social events that gave rise to the movement. Using readings from a variety of sources, we will investigate the discursive construction of power as it relates to society and politics. The class will take a case-study approach to examining social movement rhetoric, exploring the discourse that has served to resist oppressive, or perceptively oppressive, systems. (Formerly CMN 323)

INTC 324

CULTURE OF CONSUMPTION

Introduces students to the critique of our consumer culture. Teaches students how to be critical consumers and understand how to be critical consumers and understand how we consume lifestyles, images, aesthetics, and desire through our shopping patterns. Provides theoretical, observational, and critical tools that allow students to critique patterns of consumption, the production of culture through consumption, and how consumption is a means of communication. (Formerly CMNS 324)

INTC 325

PROMOTING SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES

Provides a foundation in the communication skills necessary for achieving conservation goals. Introduces communication approaches such as social marketing, citizen participation, public campaigns, and environmental interpretation that have proven effective in the work of conservation professionals. (Formerly CMNS 325 - ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATION WORKSHOP)

INTC 326

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND RHETORIC

Rhetorical perspective on environmental public discourse. Course also explores the relationship between rhetorically constituted ideas about nature and the development of political and social ideas, institutions, and practices that inform our understanding of the human place in the environment. (Formerly CMNS 326)

INTC 328

HISTORY OF RHETORIC AND COMMUNICATION

Offers an overview of historical foundations of the communication field. Examines how the formulations of rhetoric by various thinkers derived from cultural, religious, and political contexts shape human consciousness and communication patterns. Students read primary and secondary materials on classical rhetoric and rhetoric of diverse cultures. The course promotes an understanding and appreciation of antiquity and development of ideas over time in relation to current cultural and communicative patterns. (Formerly CMNS 328)

INTC 331

COMMUNICATION FIELDWORK

Provides students with experience conducting qualitative research, including data collection techniques, data coding and analysis, as well as interpretation of data and writing ethnographic reports. In addition to providing practical hands-on training in ethnographic research, this course serves to explore the theory, ethics, and politics behind various research methodologies. (Formerly CMNS 331)

INTC 332

TOPICS IN INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION METHODOLOGY

Courses explore a range of qualitative and quantitative research strategies. Topics may include more specialized modes of gathering and assessing data, using new data technologies and software programs, and conducting communication studies.

INTC 333

CULTURAL WAYS OF SPEAKING

Explores how speakers reveal culture through their everyday interactions. This course focuses on speaking as an activity through which individuals identify themselves with communities of discourse, within the United States as well as across cultural groups. It provides students with experience in discovering diverse "ways of speaking" and "codes" concerning what it means to be a person, how people relate to each other, and how they view the world. (Formerly CMNS 333)

INTC 334

URBAN COMMUNICATION

Examines relationships between material features of the city and symbolic representations of urban life (e.g., photography, film, songs, public discourse) with the goal of understanding the city as a site of communication. Special attention is paid to expressions of hope for and fear of the city. (Formerly CMNS 334)

INTC 335

LATINO COMMUNICATION, CULTURE, & COMMUNITY

Examines the relationships among Latino cultures, communication, institutions, and public and private life. Students explore the possibilities and problems of contemporary forms of community through service in Latino community organizations. The course also fulfills the junior year experiential learning requirement through community based service learning. (Formerly CMNS 335)

INTC 337

ASIAN-AMERICAN MEDIA REPRESENTATIONS

The course takes an interdisciplinary approach in the analysis of the media images and explores issues of power, identity, race, gender, class, sexual orientation and the interaction of these factors in the representation of Asian Americans. (Formerly CMNS 337)

INTC 338

ASIAN CULTURE AND COMMUNICATION

Reviews major Asian philosophical and religious traditions such as Hinduism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism and examines how these traditions influence and affect Asian cultures and communication behaviors, particularly communication among Indians, Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and Asian Americans in various contexts. (Formerly CMNS 338)

INTC 340

LEGISLATING LANGUAGE

This course examines language legislation and rules globally at national and institutional levels. We explore the ideologies and motivations that underlie such policies.

INTC 361

GENDER AND COMMUNICATION

A review of the differences in communication patterns between women and men. Topics covered include language and language usage differences, interaction patterns, gender social movements, and perceptions of the sexes generated through language and communication. (Formerly CMNS 361)

INTC 392

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Independent Study.

INTC 393

INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION PRACTICUM

Structured and supervised student participation in collegiate debating, radio production or group presentations for various audiences. Includes practical experience in research, rehearsal and performance. Students may take a maximum of 2 credit hours in one quarter, 4 credit hours in the major, and 8 total credit hours. Written permission of supervising faculty member and of the departmental chair is necessary before registration.

INTC 395

DEBATE PRACTICUM (Formerly CMNS 395)

This practicum centers on developing students' skills in debate and public discourse. Participation in forensic activities outside of the class (tournaments, public debates, etc.) is an expectation.

RELC 329

PERSUASION

Explores major theoretical assumptions of current persuasion research. Examines causes and effects of effective and ineffective persuasion.Analyzes persuasive skills and strategies for a variety of persuasion applications, e.g. political, interpersonal, intercultural, and advertising. (Formerly CMNS 329)
​​​​​