​The combined Bachelor's/Master's degree programs allow students to complete 12 graduate credit hours while still undergraduates. These three graduate level courses will count toward both the undergraduate and graduate degree programs.

The Biological Sciences (BS) offers two options:

  • Biological Sciences (BS)/Biological Sciences (MS)
  • Biological Sciences (BS)/Education Biological Sciences (MED)

Biological Sciences (BS)/Biological Sciences (MS)

Students apply to this program in spring of their junior year; interested students should meet with the Graduate Program Director of the program.  Students in this program take a maximum of twelve graduate credit hours as three courses in their senior year; these graduate courses apply toward both undergraduate and graduate Biological Sciences requirements. 

Biological Sciences (BS)/Secondary Education Biological Sciences (MEd)

This combined degree program of the College of Science and Health  and the College of Education was collaboratively developed, and is governed and taught by faculty from these units. 

Students may apply to the Program during the spring of their junior year. They must enroll in the Junior Year Experiential Learning course, TCH 320, and meet other application criteria; these include completion of at least 16 quarter credit hours at DePaul and a 3.0 GPA.  During their senior year, students are required to complete a Program capstone course, TCH 390, and three 400-level courses that count toward both their undergraduate and graduate degrees:

Biology Content Area (grades C or better required for licensure):
The following biology content area requirements are required. These can be taken as part of the major, liberal studies or open elective requirements:
 
The Master’s year comprises teacher-preparation coursework that culminates with student teaching during Spring quarter.  Upon graduation and the fulfilling of State of Illinois licensure requirements (which may require some additional course work in the student’s major and related fields), students are eligible to be licensed to teach Biological Sciences at the 6th-12th grade levels. 
 
A full description of the Program can be found on the College of Education website in the graduate course catalog.  Students interested in the Program should consult with the designated TEACH Program advisor in their home department. 
 
 

TCH 320

EXPLORING TEACHING IN THE URBAN HIGH SCHOOL

(JYEL CREDIT) This course is an invitation to secondary education as a profession, an opportunity for students considering education as a career to explore the reality of teaching and learning a disciplinary content area in a variety of Chicago-area schools. Students will become familiar with different narratives of teaching through teacher and student biographies, testimonials, literature, film, and classroom observations. They will explore the interrelationships between, for example, popular cultural beliefs about schooling; teacher and student identities; and classroom interaction. The instructor will coordinate observations in several classrooms as the basis for intensive, guided reflective work, aimed at supporting students' initial and subsequent efforts of developing identities as disciplinary content educators (25 hours of high school classroom observation required). Course is also an introduction to the TEACH Program. Offered during Fall, Winter, and Spring terms.

TCH 390

CAPSTONE: INTEGRATING EDUCATION & DISCIPLINARY FOUNDATIONS

This course is designed to help students conceptualize issues and opportunities in teaching their disciplinary content to diverse students and in different classroom contexts. Up to ten hours of community-based service/observation required. In this course, students will analyze and reflect on how teaching in their disciplines is informed by diverse cultures of schooling and youth, including the influences of economic, social, cultural, political, gender, and religious factors on schooling, educational policy and opportunity. Students will use disciplinary content to critically and creatively reflect on the teaching of that content in secondary schools. Students will be introduced to issues and ways of presenting essential disciplinary content in ways that engage diverse learners, including learners who have not been served well by formal education. Students will also develop a theory of teaching that emphasizes the intersection of disciplinary content with multicultural perspectives. Offered during Spring term only.

TCH 401

TEACHING AS A PROFESSION IN SECONDARY SCHOOL

This course is an introduction to the TEACH Program, including the College of Education's conceptual framework and teacher dispositions, and to the professional world of secondary school teaching, including the policy bodies and stakeholders that impact teaching. Within this developing understanding of the larger context of secondary education, students will begin to articulate clearly professional identities and the behaviors inherent in those identities, including their impact on student learning. Drawing on previous coursework and their growing understanding of differences in individual, ethnic, and cultural group attitudes, values, and needs, students also will learn to recognize the complexities of teaching and learning in a pluralistic society. Ultimately, students will be committed to teaching as a responsible professional who acts in an ethical and collegial fashion. 25 Level 2 field experience required. Offered during Fall term only.

TCH 414

THE NATURE OF SCIENCE

This course is about the nature of science and the interactions between science and society. It will build on the foundation of understandings that students already have about the processes and conventions of science developed through their years as science students to create opportunities for deeper understandings of the beliefs and assumptions inherent to the creation of scientific knowledge. These opportunities will be developed through direct interactions with professional scientists as well as through case studies and readings that illustrate the strengths, limits and pitfalls of the scientific endeavor as well as provide opportunities for students to relate science to their daily lives and interests and to a larger framework of human endeavor and understanding (e.g., relationships among systems of human endeavor including science and technology; relationships among scientific, technological, personal, social and cultural values). Cases will be drawn from different scientific disciplines as well as from modern and historic times. In this way, science students will have a better understanding of what it means to be a scientist and how science interfaces with society. The course is a prerequisite for TCH 424. Offered during Winter term only.

TCH 424

INQUIRY & APPLICATION IN DEVELOPING SECONDARY SCIENCE PEDAGOGY

Following TCH 414, this course transitions from asking "what does a scientist do?" to a consideration of why science literacy in the general public has been so difficult to achieve. The focusing questions for TCH 424 are: "How do we teach science? What is science literacy? Why is an understanding of science important to the general public? and What are the major obstacles and strategies to achieving science literacy?" The course begins by participants self-reflecting on their own educational experiences that led to their paths in science education: what have been their successful learning strategies, how have teachers influenced their education and what have been successful (and less than successful) classroom instructional strategies? From this, students will begin science classroom observation, discussing their observations with their peers, and speaking with educators about their experiences teaching high school science and about the goals and short-comings of science education. Throughout this process, students will read seminal literature on science literacy and explore cases challenging their notions of the teacher-learner relationship and the relationship between science and society. As a result of this course, students will gain a deeper understanding of scientific literacy and the barriers to understanding and teaching science as well as identify what makes an exceptional science teacher able to prepare both future scientists and a knowledgeable public. 25 Level 1 Field Experience hours required. Offered during Spring term.

BIO 191

GENERAL BIOLOGY I FOR SCIENCE MAJORS

Focuses on the unity of life: its biochemical and cellular makeup and functions, the acquisition and utilization of energy, and the storage and utilization of genetic information. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee. CO-REQUISITE(S): Recommended: CHE 130 and CHE 131.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 192

GENERAL BIOLOGY II FOR SCIENCE MAJORS

Introduction to evolution, ecology, organismal development and diversity. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 and BIO 191 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 193

GENERAL BIOLOGY III FOR SCIENCE MAJORS

Deals primarily with diversity and development within the plant and animal kingdoms including basic principles of physiology. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 and BIO 192 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 215

ECOLOGY

Study of organismal interactions; responses of individuals, populations and natural communities to their external environment. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 193 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 250

CELL BIOLOGY

Fundamentals of cell form and function studied at the molecular and organelle level, including basic cellular biochemistry, ultrastructure and physiology. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 193 and (CHE 134 or CHE 138) are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 309

PLANT PHYSIOLOGY

A study of the functional and developmental aspects of flowering plants. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 250 or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 260

GENETICS

Transmission of heritable traits, nature of genetic material, manner of its expression, its mutability, and its significance with respect to organismal and species variation. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 191 and BIO 193 are a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 130

PRECALCULUS

Functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse functions, polynomial and rational functions.
Prerequisites:
MAT 101 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 147

CALCULUS WITH INTEGRATED PRECALCULUS I

Limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, and applications, with precalculus review included for each topic. The full MAT 147-8-9 sequence covers all the material of MAT 150-1-2 plus additional precalculus material.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or equivalents or placement by test is a prerequisite for this course.

MAT 150

CALCULUS I

Limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, extrema, curve sketching, and optimization. This course meets for an additional 1.5-hour lab session each week for enrichment and problem solving.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this course.

MAT 160

CALCULUS FOR MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE MAJORS I

Limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, extrema, curve sketching, and optimization. Course meets for an additional 1.5 hour lab session each week in order to cover the material in greater depth. Students considering a math major are advised to take the 160 or 170 sequence.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 170

CALCULUS I WITH SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS

The course covers the following topics using examples from the sciences: Functions as models, logarithmic scale graphing, exponential growth and decay, difference equations and limits of sequences, geometric series, functions and limits, trigonometric functions and their limits, continuity, limits at infinity, the derivative, differentiation rules, derivatives of trigonometric and exponential functions, related rates, derivatives of inverse and logarithm functions. Course meets for an additional lab session each week during which time students will work on applied mathematics projects based on the topics covered in the course. Students majoring in the sciences should consult with their major department to decide between the 160 and 170 sequences.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 131

TRIGONOMETRY

Trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, laws of sines and cosines, polar coordinates and complex plane.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or equivalents or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 148

CALCULUS WITH INTEGRATED PRECALCULUS II

Extrema, curve sketching, related rates, definite and indefinite integrals, applications of the integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, with precalculus review included for each topic.
Prerequisites:
MAT 147 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 151

CALCULUS II

Definite and indefinite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, applications of the integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse trigonometric functions, techniques of integration. This course meets for an additional 1.5-hour lab session each week for enrichment and problem solving.
Prerequisites:
MAT 150 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 161

CALCULUS FOR MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE MAJORS II

Definite and indefinite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, applications of the integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse trigonometric functions, techniques of integration. Course meets for an additional 1.5 hour lab session each week in order to cover the material in greater depth.
Prerequisites:
MAT 150 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a prerequisite for this course.

CHE 130

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I

This introductory course for science majors emphasizes the composition of matter, atomic and molecular structure, bonding and chemical reactions. It is the first in the three-course sequence of General Chemistry. This course meets for three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 131.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or (CHE 128 and CHE 129) is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 131

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY

Laboratory course to be taken in conjunction with CHE 130. The course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE130. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE130. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or (CHE 128 and CHE 129) is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 132

GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

Second course of three in the General Chemistry series. Topics discussed include: common states of matter, phase transitions, properties of solutions, kinetics and equilibrium. This course meets for three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE133.
Prerequisites:
CHE 130 and CHE 131 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 133

GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 132. The Course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques learned in lab provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE132. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 132. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
CHE 130 and 131 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 134

GENERAL CHEMISTRY III

Third of three courses in the General Chemistry sequence. Topics included in lecture: chemical equilibrium in aqueous solution (acids and bases, solubility, complex ion formation), Thermodynamics (entropy and free energy), electrochemistry, chemistry of d-block elements and descriptive chemistry. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE135.
Prerequisites:
CHE 132 and CHE 133 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 135

GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY III

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 134. The Course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE134. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 134. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
CHE 132 and CHE 133 are a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 150

GENERAL PHYSICS I

This course provides a comprehensive, non-calculus introduction to physics. Vectors, forces, Newtonia mechanics of translational and rotational motion. This course is intended for life science and health science majors. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or above is a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 151

GENERAL PHYSICS II

Continuation of PHY 150. Topics include heat, thermodynamics, sound and light. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
PHY 150 is a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 152

GENERAL PHYSICS III

Continuation of PHY 151. Topics include electricity, magnetism and modern physics. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
PHY 151 is a prerequisite for this class.