Course Requirements

Open Electives

Open elective credit also is required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours.

 

BIO 215

ECOLOGY

Study of organismal interactions; responses of individuals, populations and natural communities to their external environment. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 193 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 235

EVOLUTION

This lecture/laboratory course will examine basic selection, population genetics, development, speciation, extinction, systematics, and the history of evolution. In the lab, students will learn some of the modern research methods used in the study of evolution. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 191, BIO 192 and BIO 193 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 209

PLANT BIOLOGY

A study of plant evolution, diversity, reproduction, developmental plant anatomy, regulation of plant growth and development, and plant physiology. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 193 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 210

MICROBIOLOGY

Biology of microorganisms with emphasis on viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 191 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 250

CELL BIOLOGY

Fundamentals of cell form and function studied at the molecular and organelle level, including basic cellular biochemistry, ultrastructure and physiology. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 193 and (CHE 134 or CHE 138) are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 270

COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY

This lecture-laboratory course explores the diversity, anatomy, and evolution of vertebrates. The laboratory portion includes dissection and observation of various vertebrates.
Prerequisites:
BIO 193 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 301

ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

An exploration of the types of animal behavior and modifiers of behavior as based on neuroendocrine function, with special emphasis on Felids. Lecture - Field Studies. Laboratory required . Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 191, BIO 192 and BIO 193 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 304

FIELD METHODS FOR BIOLOGISTS

The course will focus on the methods needed to initiate and undertake observations on Midwest ecosystems. Students will learn methods and put into practice the tools required to begin a site inventory and to assess population characteristics. The data gathered by the class will be archived and used as a starting point for subsequent studies. Each student will have an original research project involving extensive field work in nature.

BIO 309

PLANT PHYSIOLOGY

A study of the functional and developmental aspects of flowering plants. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 250 or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 310

VERTEBRATE PHYSIOLOGY

Functions and regulatory mechanisms of vertebrate cells, organs and organ systems with special emphasis on mammals. Lecture-Laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 250 or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 316

PHYCOLOGY

Introduction to algae with emphasis on taxonomy, morphology, ultrastructure, physiology, life histories of freshwater and marine species. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee. Cross-listed as BIO 416.
Prerequisites:
BIO 193 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 317

AQUATIC BIOLOGY

The study of biological, physical and chemical phenomena in freshwater environments. Emphasis on organisms and their ecology. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 192 and BIO 215 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 318

FIELD STUDIES IN MARINE AND ESTUARINE BIOLOGY

This course is designed for science majors with an interest in marine and estuarine biology and will examine this subject from an ecological perspective. The primary objectives of the course are: 1) to explore the diversity of marine and estuarine life; 2) to understand the manner in which physical and biological factors influence biological diversity in marine systems; 3) to understand the role that humans play in shaping these dynamics; and 4) to develop professional connections and gain real-life experiences in marine science.
Prerequisites:
BIO 191, BIO 192, BIO 193 and (BIO 215 or BIO 235) or instructor consent are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 320

MICROBIAL ECOLOGY

This course will explore key roles that microorganisms play in life on earth.This course will also address how these microorganisms are being used in current areas of research in microbiology. This is a lab course, which will enable students to study processes used in the enrichment, isolation, and identification of microorganisms from various environments.
Prerequisites:
BIO 210 and Junior standing are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 321

MOLECULAR METHODS IN ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION

This course will provide hands-on experience in methods of detecting and analyzing molecular variation in nature. By the end of the course, students should be competent employing molecular markers to answer a wide variety of basic questions in ecology and evolution.
Prerequisites:
BIO 215 or BIO 235 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 325

PALEOBIOLOGY

This lecture/laboratory course will introduce students to various principles of paleobiology and to provide a broad survey of important taxonomic groups. This course will cover topics such as: the concept of geologic time, evolution, extinction, morphology, taxonomic classification, fossilization, paleoecology, biogeography, and biostratigraphy. The laboratory portion of the course will reinforce the lecture topics and offer an opportunity to examine fossil specimens and compare them with modern forms.
Prerequisites:
BIO 193 and BIO 335 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 330

DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY

A survey of developmental phenomena in animals from fertilization to sexual maturity. Students will gain a current understanding of the genetic, cellular, and environmental mechanisms that shape the body and its major organs.
Prerequisites:
BIO 250 and BIO 260 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 333

MYCOLOGY

This course provides an opportunity for students to integrate their knowledge of cell biology, genetics, ecology and physiology at the organismal level by focusing on fungi. Students will gain an appreciation of the biological diversity within the major groups of fungi and their role in the environment, research and biotechnology. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 215, BIO 250, and BIO 260 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 335

CONCEPTS IN EVOLUTION

Study of evolution and diversity in the living world. Lecture only.
Prerequisites:
BIO 235 or (BIO 216 and BIO 260) are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 345

TOPICS IN PALEOBIOLOGY

A seminar course examining various topics in paleobiology (the study of ancient life) including morphological concepts, macroevolutionary processes, extinction events, phylogenetic systematics, paleoecology, paleoebiogeography, and the adequacy of the fossil record. Readings include classic and recent articles in the fields of paleobiology.

BIO 350

ANIMAL ADAPTATIONS

An introduction to the ecological concept of adaptation. Adaptation is defined and illustrated using specific animal examples. Discussion will focus on how these specializations in structure and function equip the animal for survival.
Prerequisites:
Junior standing is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 352

ADVANCED COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY

Comparative and environmental approach to the functions and mechanisms of vertebrate organ systems. Selected topics will be addressed using a lecture/discussion/seminar format. Cross-listed as BIO 452.
Prerequisites:
BIO 310 or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 386

INTRODUCTION TO ENDOCRINOLOGY

A study of hormones as chemical regulators of development, growth, metabolism, homeostasis, reproduction, response to stress, and behavior; as well as hormone synthesis, chemistry, mechanisms of action, and endocrine gland structure.
Prerequisites:
BIO 250, BIO 260 and BIO 310 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 390

SPECIAL TOPICS

Occasional courses offered at an advanced level. See the schedule of classes for current offerings. Cross-listed as BIO 490.
Prerequisites:
Junior or Senior standing is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 260

ENVIRONMENTAL DATA ANALYSIS

This course provides an overview of the biometrical techniques employed in the analysis of environmental data. Topics include: handling of data, experimental designs, testing for differences between an experimental and a control group, testing for differences among many groups, and determining trends in data. Data from the environmental sciences is used throughout, and students are introduced to appropriate software for data analysis.

BIO 206

BIOSTATISTICS

A survey of a variety of statistical methods used to analyze biological data.
Prerequisites:
BIO 192 or BIO 193 is a prerequisite for this class.