​The combined Bachelor's/Master's degree programs allow students to complete 12 graduate credit hours while still undergraduates. These three graduate level courses will count toward both the undergraduate and graduate degree programs.

Chemistry (BA)/Secondary Education Chemistry (MEd) 

This combined degree program of the College of Science and Health and the College of Education was collaboratively developed, and is governed and taught by faculty from these units.
 
Students may apply to the Program during the spring of their junior year. They must enroll in the Junior Year Experiential Learning course, TCH 320, and meet other application criteria; these include completion of at least 16 quarter credit hours at DePaul and a 3.0 GPA.  During their senior year, students are required to complete a Program capstone course, TCH 390, and three 400-level courses that count toward both their undergraduate and graduate degrees:

​In addition, students are responsible for all the course requirements for the BA in Chemistry Grades of C or better are required for licensure.  ​

The Master’s year comprises teacher-preparation coursework that culminates with student teaching during Spring quarter.  Upon graduation and the fulfilling of State of Illinois licensure requirements (which may require some additional course work in the student’s major and related fields), students are eligible to be licensed to teach Chemistry at the 6th-12th grade levels. 
 
A full description of the Program can be found on the College of Education website in the graduate course catalog.  Students interested in the Program should consult with the designated TEACH Program advisor in their home department. 

TCH 390

CAPSTONE: INTEGRATING EDUCATION & DISCIPLINARY FOUNDATIONS

This course is designed to help students conceptualize issues and opportunities in teaching their disciplinary content to diverse students and in different classroom contexts. Up to ten hours of community-based service/observation required. In this course, students will analyze and reflect on how teaching in their disciplines is informed by diverse cultures of schooling and youth, including the influences of economic, social, cultural, political, gender, and religious factors on schooling, educational policy and opportunity. Students will use disciplinary content to critically and creatively reflect on the teaching of that content in secondary schools. Students will be introduced to issues and ways of presenting essential disciplinary content in ways that engage diverse learners, including learners who have not been served well by formal education. Students will also develop a theory of teaching that emphasizes the intersection of disciplinary content with multicultural perspectives. Offered during Spring term only.

TCH 401

TEACHING AS A PROFESSION IN SECONDARY SCHOOL

This course is an introduction to the TEACH Program, including the College of Education's conceptual framework and teacher dispositions, and to the professional world of secondary school teaching, including the policy bodies and stakeholders that impact teaching. Within this developing understanding of the larger context of secondary education, students will begin to articulate clearly professional identities and the behaviors inherent in those identities, including their impact on student learning. Drawing on previous coursework and their growing understanding of differences in individual, ethnic, and cultural group attitudes, values, and needs, students also will learn to recognize the complexities of teaching and learning in a pluralistic society. Ultimately, students will be committed to teaching as a responsible professional who acts in an ethical and collegial fashion. 25 Level 2 field experience required. Offered during Fall term only.

TCH 414

THE NATURE OF SCIENCE

This course is about the nature of science and the interactions between science and society. It will build on the foundation of understandings that students already have about the processes and conventions of science developed through their years as science students to create opportunities for deeper understandings of the beliefs and assumptions inherent to the creation of scientific knowledge. These opportunities will be developed through direct interactions with professional scientists as well as through case studies and readings that illustrate the strengths, limits and pitfalls of the scientific endeavor as well as provide opportunities for students to relate science to their daily lives and interests and to a larger framework of human endeavor and understanding (e.g., relationships among systems of human endeavor including science and technology; relationships among scientific, technological, personal, social and cultural values). Cases will be drawn from different scientific disciplines as well as from modern and historic times. In this way, science students will have a better understanding of what it means to be a scientist and how science interfaces with society. The course is a prerequisite for TCH 424. Offered during Winter term only.

TCH 424

INQUIRY & APPLICATION IN DEVELOPING SECONDARY SCIENCE PEDAGOGY

Following TCH 414, this course transitions from asking "what does a scientist do?" to a consideration of why science literacy in the general public has been so difficult to achieve. The focusing questions for TCH 424 are: "How do we teach science? What is science literacy? Why is an understanding of science important to the general public? and What are the major obstacles and strategies to achieving science literacy?" The course begins by participants self-reflecting on their own educational experiences that led to their paths in science education: what have been their successful learning strategies, how have teachers influenced their education and what have been successful (and less than successful) classroom instructional strategies? From this, students will begin science classroom observation, discussing their observations with their peers, and speaking with educators about their experiences teaching high school science and about the goals and short-comings of science education. Throughout this process, students will read seminal literature on science literacy and explore cases challenging their notions of the teacher-learner relationship and the relationship between science and society. As a result of this course, students will gain a deeper understanding of scientific literacy and the barriers to understanding and teaching science as well as identify what makes an exceptional science teacher able to prepare both future scientists and a knowledgeable public. 25 Level 1 Field Experience hours required. Offered during Spring term.

TCH 320

EXPLORING TEACHING IN THE URBAN HIGH SCHOOL

(JYEL CREDIT) This course is an invitation to secondary education as a profession, an opportunity for students considering education as a career to explore the reality of teaching and learning a disciplinary content area in a variety of Chicago-area schools. Students will become familiar with different narratives of teaching through teacher and student biographies, testimonials, literature, film, and classroom observations. They will explore the interrelationships between, for example, popular cultural beliefs about schooling; teacher and student identities; and classroom interaction. The instructor will coordinate observations in several classrooms as the basis for intensive, guided reflective work, aimed at supporting students' initial and subsequent efforts of developing identities as disciplinary content educators (25 hours of high school classroom observation required). Course is also an introduction to the TEACH Program. Offered during Fall, Winter, and Spring terms.

CHE 130

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I

This introductory course for science majors emphasizes the composition of matter, atomic and molecular structure, bonding and chemical reactions. It is the first in the three-course sequence of General Chemistry. This course meets for three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Formerly CHE 111LEC. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 131.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or (CHE 128 and CHE 129) is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 131

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY

Laboratory course to be taken in conjunction with CHE 130. The course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE130. Formerly CHE 111LAB. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE130.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or (CHE 128 and CHE 129) is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 132

GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

Second course of three in the General Chemistry series. Topics discussed include: common states of matter, phase transitions, properties of solutions, kinetics and equilibrium. This course meets for three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Formerly CHE 113LEC. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE133.
Prerequisites:
CHE 130 and CHE 131 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 133

GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 132. The Course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques learned in lab provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE132. Formerly CHE 113LAB. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 132.
Prerequisites:
CHE 130 and 131 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 134

GENERAL CHEMISTRY III

Third of three courses in the General Chemistry sequence. Topics included in lecture: chemical equilibrium in aqueous solution (acids and bases, solubility, complex ion formation), Thermodynamics (entropy and free energy), electrochemistry, chemistry of d-block elements and descriptive chemistry. Formerly CHE 115LEC. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE135.
Prerequisites:
CHE 132 and CHE 133 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 135

GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY III

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 134. The Course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE134. Formerly CHE 115LAB. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 134.
Prerequisites:
CHE 132 and CHE 133 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 230

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I

First in a sequence of courses designed to investigate what organic chemistry is and how it works, by emphasizing the relationship between structure and function of organic molecule and the language and fundamental concepts of organic chemistry, including: structure and bonding; acid-base reactions; functional groups; thermodynamics and kinetics of organic reactions; stereochemistry; substitution and elimination reactions of alkyl halides. Formerly CHE 171LEC. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE231.
Prerequisites:
(CHE 134 and CHE 135) or (CHE 138 and CHE 139) are prerequisites for this class.

CHE 231

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE230. Formerly CHE 171LAB. CO-REQUISTE(S): CHE 230.
Prerequisites:
(CHE 134 and CHE 135) or (CHE 138 and CHE 139) are a prerequisite and CHE 230 is a corequisite for this class.

CHE 232

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

Second in a sequence of courses designed to investigate what organic chemistry is and how it works, by emphasizing the relationship between structure and function of organic molecules. Specific topics investigated include the reactivity and synthesis of alcohols, ethers, epoxides, alkenes, alkynes, alkanes, conjugated, and aromatic compounds. Formerly CHE 173LEC. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE233
Prerequisites:
CHE 230 and CHE 231 are prerequisites for this class..

CHE 233

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE232. Formerly CHE 173LAB. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 232
Prerequisites:
CHE 230 and CHE 231 are prerequisites for this class..

CHE 204

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Use of equilibrium chemistry to solve problems of chemical analysis in acid-base, solubility, metal-ligand complex, and electrochemical systems. Formerly CHE 205LEC. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 202 and CHE205.
Prerequisites:
(CHE 134 and CHE 135) or (CHE 138 and CHE 139) are prerequisites for this class.

CHE 205

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE205. Methods include wet chemistry and instrumental techniques of analysis. Formerly CHE 205LAB. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 204.
Prerequisites:
(CHE 134 and CHE 135) or (CHE 138 and CHE 139) are prerequisites for this class.

CHE 302

QUANTUM CHEMISTRY

Quantum mechanics. Formerly CHE 215LEC. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE303
Prerequisites:
CHE 204 and CHE 205 and (MAT 149 or MAT 152 or MAT 162 or MAT 172) and PHY 172 are prerequisites and CHE 303 is a corequisite for this class.

CHE 303

EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE302. Introduction to essential skills and techniques of experimental physical chemistry. Topics include the use of data analysis software, computational methods, basic spectroscopy, and technical writing. Formerly CHE 215LAB. CO-REQUISITE(S):CHE302.
Prerequisites:
CHE 204 and CHE 205 and (MAT 149 or MAT 152 or MAT 162 or MAT 172) and PHY 172 are prerequisites and CHE 302 is a corequisite for this course.

CHE 304

THERMOCHEMISTRY

Thermochemistry. Formerly CHE 210. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE305.
Prerequisites:
CHE 302 is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 305

EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE304. The goal of this laboratory course is to teach students essential skills and techniques of physical chemistry. Experimental work will focus on electronic spectroscopy and thermodynamics. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE304.
Prerequisites:
CHE 303 is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 202

APPLIED PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS

This is a lecture course that introduces students to concepts related to the statistical analysis of experimental data, covering material from uncertainty, significant figures, and propagation of error through least squares fitting and descriptions and applications of several statistical distributions. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE204.
Prerequisites:
(CHE 134 and CHE 135) or (CHE 138 and CHE 139) are a prerequisite and CHE 204 is a corequisite for this class.

CHE 394

SEMINAR

This course is required for all chemistry majors. This course is designed to enhance your ability to: critically read and summarize scientific literature, thoughtfully listen to a scientific seminar, articulate questions regarding a scientific seminar, and orally present a scientific paper.
Prerequisites:
(CHE 234 and CHE 235 and at least Junior year standing) or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course.

MAT 147

CALCULUS WITH INTEGRATED PRECALCULUS I

Limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, and applications, with precalculus review included for each topic. The full MAT 147-8-9 sequence will cover all the material of MAT 150-1-2 plus additional precalculus material.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or equivalents or placement by test is a prerequisite for this course.

MAT 148

CALCULUS WITH INTEGRATED PRECALCULUS II

Extrema, curve sketching, related rates, definite and indefinite integrals, applications of the integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, with precalculus review included for each topic.
Prerequisites:
MAT 147 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 150

CALCULUS I

Limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, exponential and logarithmic functions, related rates and other applications.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this course.

MAT 151

CALCULUS II

Applications of the derivative, extrema, curve sketching, definite and indefinite integrals, applications of the integral.
Prerequisites:
MAT 150 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 160

CALCULUS FOR MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE MAJORS I

Limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, exponential and logarithmic functions, related rates and other applications. Course meets for an additional 1.5 hour lab session each week in order to cover the material in greater depth. Students considering a math major are advised to take the 160 or 170 sequence.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 161

CALCULUS FOR MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE MAJORS II

Applications of the derivative, extrema, curve sketching, definite and indefinite integrals, applications of the integral. Course meets for an additional 1.5 hour lab session each week in order to cover the material in greater depth.
Prerequisites:
MAT 150 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a prerequisite for this course.

MAT 170

CALCULUS I WITH SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS

The course will cover the following topics using examples from the sciences: Functions as models, logarithmic scale graphing, exponential growth and decay, difference equations and limits of sequences, geometric series, functions and limits, trigonometric functions and their limits, continuity, limits at infinity, the derivative, differentiation rules, derivatives of trigonometric and exponential functions, related rates, derivatives of inverse and logarithm functions. Course meets for an additional lab session each week during which time students will work on applied mathematics projects based on the topics covered in the course. Students majoring in the sciences should consult with their major department to decide between the 160 and 170 sequences.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 171

CALCULUS II WITH SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS

The course will cover the following topics using examples from the sciences: Applications of the derivative including approximation and local linearity, differentials, extrema and the Mean Value Theorem, monotonicity and concavity, extrema, inflection points, graphing, L'Hospital's Rule, optimization, and the Newton-Raphson method, antiderivaties, the definite integral, Riemann sums, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, area, cumulative change, average value of a function, and techniques of integration: substitution rule and integration by parts. Course meets for an additional lab session each week during which time students will work on applied mathematics projects based on the topics covered in the course.
Prerequisites:
MAT 150 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 150

GENERAL PHYSICS I

Mechanics, vibrations and fluids. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or above is a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 151

GENERAL PHYSICS II

Heat, thermodynamics, sound and light. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
PHY 150 is a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 152

GENERAL PHYSICS III

Electricity, magnetism and modern physics. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
PHY 151 is a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 170

UNIVERSITY PHYSICS I

Mechanics and fluids. Laboratory fee. Autumn. COREQUISITE(S): MAT 147 or MAT 160 or MAT 170.
Prerequisites:
MAT 147 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a corequisite for this class.

PHY 171

UNIVERSITY PHYSICS II

Heat, sound and light. Laboratory fee. Winter COREQUISITE(S): MAT 161 or 171 or 148.
Prerequisites:
PHY 170 is a prerequisite for this course.

PHY 172

UNIVERSITY PHYSICS III

Electricity and magnetism. Laboratory fee. Spring COREQUISITE(S):MAT 162 or 172 or 149.
Prerequisites:
PHY 171 is a prerequisite for this course.

CHE 234

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY III

Third in a sequence of courses designed to investigate what organic chemistry is and how it works, by emphasizing the relationship between structure and function of organic molecules. Specific topics investigated include the reactivity and synthesis of carbonyl compounds; amines; and bio-molecules. Formerly CHE 175LEC. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE235.
Prerequisites:
CHE 232 and CHE 233 are a prerequisite and CHE 235 is a corequisite for this class.

CHE 235

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY III

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE234. Formerly CHE 175LAB. CO-REQUISITE(S):CHE 234.
Prerequisites:
CHE 232 and CHE 233 are a prerequisite and CHE 234 is a corequisite for this class.

CHE 306

KINETICS AND MOLECULAR DYNAMICS

Kinetics and molecular dynamics. Formerly CHE 211LEC. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE307.
Prerequisites:
CHE 302 and CHE 303 are a prerequisite and CHE 307 is a corequisite for this class.

CHE 307

EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY III

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE306. The goal of this laboratory course is to teach students essential skills and techniques of physical chemistry. Experimental work will focus on thermodynamics at the outset and then kinetics for the final two experiments of the quarter. Formerly CHE 211LAB. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE306.
Prerequisites:
CHE 302 and CHE 303 are a prerequisite and CHE 306 is a corequisite for this class.

CHE 264

ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY

Atmospheric chemistry with a focus on physical and chemical processes in the troposphere and stratosphere. Formerly CHE 265LEC. CO-REQUISITE(S):CHE265.
Prerequisites:
CHE 204 and CHE 205 are prerequisites for this course.

CHE 265

ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 264, with emphasis placed on gas phase and particulate measurements. Formerly CHE 265LAB. CO-REQUISITE(S):CHE264.
Prerequisites:
CHE 205 is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 268

SOLID WASTE CHEMISTRY

Fundamental chemical processes involved in the processing of solid wastes. Offered in Spring quarters of odd-numbered years. Formerly CHE 269LEC. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE269LAB.
Prerequisites:
CHE 204 and CHE 205 are prerequisites for this course.

CHE 269

SOLID WASTE CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 268, offered in spring of odd-numbered years. Formerly CHE 269LAB. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 268
Prerequisites:
CHE 204 and CHE 205 are prerequisites for this course.

CHE 320

INTERMEDIATE INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

Lecture course emphasizing synthesis, structure and reactions of metal ligand compounds of general and biological interest. Formerly CHE 321LEC. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE321.
Prerequisites:
(CHE 234 and CHE 235) or (CHE 238 and CHE 239) are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 321

INTERMEDIATE INORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 320. Formerly CHE 321LAB. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 320.
Prerequisites:
(CHE 234 and CHE 235) or (CHE 238 and CHE 239) are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 318

BIOPHYSICAL CHEMSTRY

This course is designed for advanced undergraduate students with an interest in the interdisciplinary field of biophysics. The course will focus on several subfields of biophysical chemistry, including: fluorescence as a tool in biophysics; protein folding; biophysical applications of single molecule fluorescence, atomic force microscopy, X-ray crystallography, mass spectrometry, and NMR spectroscopy. Additional topics will be selected by students from a list of possible choices.
Prerequisites:
CHE304 or CHE342 is a prerequisite for this course.

CHE 326

INTERMEDIATE ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

This one-quarter course is designed to develop the chemical intuition necessary for advanced work in organic chemistry through a review of general organic chemistry, with emphasis on the following more advanced topics: reaction mechanisms and why reactions occur; heteraromatic chemistry; curved-arrow formalism and multi-step reactions; molecular orbitals and symmetry-controlled reactions; Hammett equation and structure-activity relationships; functional group interconversions; carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions; more advanced treatment of structure and mechanism; introduction to design and planning of synthesis of organic compounds. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE327
Prerequisites:
(CHE234 and CHE235) or (CHE238 and CHE239) are prerequisites for this course.

CHE 327

INTERMEDIATE ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE326. This course is designed to provide the student with a thorough introduction to the experimental techniques utilized by practicing chemists in the synthesis, isolation, and characterization of organic compounds. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 326.
Prerequisites:
(CHE234 and CHE235) or (CHE238 and CHE239) are prerequisites for this course.

CHE 342

BIOCHEMISTRY II

Second in a three-course sequence, directed at those who wish an in- depth exploration of modern biochemistry. This course covers energy metabolism and biosynthetic pathways, with emphasis on their coordinated regulation. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE343.
Prerequisites:
CHE 340 and CHE 341are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 343

EXPERIMENTAL BIOCHEMISTRY II

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 342. Applications of basic techniques from CHE 341: DNA cloning and transformation; protein expression, purification, and characterization; and advanced biophysical methods. Formerly CHE 343LAB. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE342.
Prerequisites:
CHE 340 and CHE 341are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 344

BIOCHEMISTRY III

Third in a three-course sequence, directed at those who wish an in- depth exploration of modern biochemistry. This course covers metabolism, nucleic acid structure and replication, transcription and translation. Also included are methods of biotechnology and an introduction to reading the primary literature. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE345.
Prerequisites:
CHE 342 is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 345

EXPERIMENTAL BIOCHEMISTRY III

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 344. This course will introduce students to bioinformatics methods including protein function prediction and structure analysis, DNA/protein sequence analysis and alignment, and special topics laboratory techniques. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE344
Prerequisites:
CHE 343 is a prerequisite for this course.

CHE 360

MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY

This course emphasizes organic chemical principles and reactions vital to drug design and drug action in the human body. Medicinal chemists design molecules that alter phenomena operating at the overlap of chemistry, biochemistry, cell biology, and pharmacology. This course introduces the conceptual frameworks and methods employed in drug development using case histories and mechanisms of clinically important drugs as illustrative examples.
Prerequisites:
CHE 234 or CHE238 are prerequisites for this course.

CHE 362

DRUGS AND TOXICOLOGY

This course covers the chemical and biological analysis of the metabolism and distribution of drugs, toxins and chemicals in animals and humans, and the mechanism by which they cause therapeutic and toxic responses. Metabolism and toxicity as a basis for drug development, metabolic polymorphisms and biomarkers of exposure are also covered.
Prerequisites:
CHE 360 is a prerequisite for this course.

CHE 364

NUTRITION

This is a one-quarter course focused on the advanced chemical aspects of human nutrition. The topics include the nutritive and toxic content of foods and health effects, a review of basic metabolic processes, nutrient transport and storage systems, cell signaling and regulation, and hormonal regulation and fuel utilization.
Prerequisites:
CHE 234 or CHE 238 is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 378

APPLIED SPECTROSCOPY

Organic structure determination through the interpretation of spectral information. Formerly CHE 356.
Prerequisites:
CHE235 or CHE239 is a prerequisite for this course.
​​