​The combined Bachelor's/Master's degree programs allow students to complete 12 graduate credit hours while still undergraduates. These three graduate level courses will count toward both the undergraduate and graduate degree programs.

​Environmental Science (BS)/Secondary Education Environmental Science (MEd)

This combined degree program of the College of Science and Health and the College of Education was collaboratively developed, and is governed and taught by faculty from these units. 

Students may apply to the Program during the spring of their junior year. They must enroll in the Junior Year Experiential Learning course, TCH 320, and meet other application criteria; these include completion of at least 16 quarter credit hours at DePaul and a 3.0 GPA.  During their senior year, students are required to complete a Program capstone course, TCH 390, and three 400-level courses that count toward both their undergraduate and graduate degrees:

Environmental Science Content Area (grades of C or better required for licensure):
The following environmental content area requirements are required. These can be taken as part of the major, liberal studies or open elective requirements:

The Master’s year comprises teacher-preparation coursework that culminates with student teaching during Spring quarter.  Upon graduation and the fulfilling of State of Illinois licensure requirements (which may require some additional course work in the student’s major and related fields), students are eligible to be licensed to teach Environmental Science at the 6th-12th grade levels.  

A full description of the Program can be found on the College of Education website in the graduate course catalog.  Students interested in the Program should consult with the designated TEACH Program advisor in their home department.

 

TCH 424

INQUIRY & APPLICATION IN DEVELOPING SECONDARY SCIENCE PEDAGOGY

Following TCH 414, this course transitions from asking "what does a scientist do?" to a consideration of why science literacy in the general public has been so difficult to achieve. The focusing questions for TCH 424 are: "How do we teach science? What is science literacy? Why is an understanding of science important to the general public? and What are the major obstacles and strategies to achieving science literacy?" The course begins by participants self-reflecting on their own educational experiences that led to their paths in science education: what have been their successful learning strategies, how have teachers influenced their education and what have been successful (and less than successful) classroom instructional strategies? From this, students will begin science classroom observation, discussing their observations with their peers, and speaking with educators about their experiences teaching high school science and about the goals and short-comings of science education. Throughout this process, students will read seminal literature on science literacy and explore cases challenging their notions of the teacher-learner relationship and the relationship between science and society. As a result of this course, students will gain a deeper understanding of scientific literacy and the barriers to understanding and teaching science as well as identify what makes an exceptional science teacher able to prepare both future scientists and a knowledgeable public. 25 Level 1 Field Experience hours required. Offered during Spring term.
Prerequisites:
TCH 414 is a prerequisite for this class.

TCH 414

THE NATURE OF SCIENCE

This course is about the nature of science and the interactions between science and society. It will build on the foundation of understandings that students already have about the processes and conventions of science developed through their years as science students to create opportunities for deeper understandings of the beliefs and assumptions inherent to the creation of scientific knowledge. These opportunities will be developed through direct interactions with professional scientists as well as through case studies and readings that illustrate the strengths, limits and pitfalls of the scientific endeavor as well as provide opportunities for students to relate science to their daily lives and interests and to a larger framework of human endeavor and understanding (e.g., relationships among systems of human endeavor including science and technology; relationships among scientific, technological, personal, social and cultural values). Cases will be drawn from different scientific disciplines as well as from modern and historic times. In this way, science students will have a better understanding of what it means to be a scientist and how science interfaces with society. The course is a prerequisite for TCH 424. Offered during Winter term only.

A&S 491

ADMINISTRATIVE THEORY AND BEHAVIOR

This course concerns theoretical concepts and empirical research relating to administrative behavior in organizations with special reference to educational organizations. Concepts are examined within the typical decisional framework of supervisors, chief school business officers, principles, and superintendents, and similar positions in the helping professions. Assignments are individualized.
Prerequisites:
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

TCH 401

TEACHING AS A PROFESSION IN SECONDARY SCHOOL

This course is an introduction to the TEACH Program, including the College of Education's conceptual framework and teacher dispositions, and to the professional world of secondary school teaching, including the policy bodies and stakeholders that impact teaching. Within this developing understanding of the larger context of secondary education, students will begin to articulate clearly professional identities and the behaviors inherent in those identities, including their impact on student learning. Drawing on previous coursework and their growing understanding of differences in individual, ethnic, and cultural group attitudes, values, and needs, students also will learn to recognize the complexities of teaching and learning in a pluralistic society. Ultimately, students will be committed to teaching as a responsible professional who acts in an ethical and collegial fashion. 25 Level 2 field experience required. Offered during Fall term only.

TCH 320

EXPLORING TEACHING IN THE URBAN HIGH SCHOOL

(JYEL CREDIT) This course is an invitation to secondary education as a profession, an opportunity for students considering education as a career to explore the reality of teaching and learning a disciplinary content area in a variety of Chicago-area schools. Students will become familiar with different narratives of teaching through teacher and student biographies, testimonials, literature, film, and classroom observations. They will explore the interrelationships between, for example, popular cultural beliefs about schooling; teacher and student identities; and classroom interaction. The instructor will coordinate observations in several classrooms as the basis for intensive, guided reflective work, aimed at supporting students' initial and subsequent efforts of developing identities as disciplinary content educators (25 hours of high school classroom observation required). Course is also an introduction to the TEACH Program. Offered during Fall, Winter, and Spring terms.

TCH 390

CAPSTONE: INTEGRATING EDUCATION & DISCIPLINARY FOUNDATIONS

This course is designed to help students conceptualize issues and opportunities in teaching their disciplinary content to diverse students and in different classroom contexts. Up to ten hours of community-based service/observation required. In this course, students will analyze and reflect on how teaching in their disciplines is informed by diverse cultures of schooling and youth, including the influences of economic, social, cultural, political, gender, and religious factors on schooling, educational policy and opportunity. Students will use disciplinary content to critically and creatively reflect on the teaching of that content in secondary schools. Students will be introduced to issues and ways of presenting essential disciplinary content in ways that engage diverse learners, including learners who have not been served well by formal education. Students will also develop a theory of teaching that emphasizes the intersection of disciplinary content with multicultural perspectives. Offered during Spring term only.

BIO 191

GENERAL BIOLOGY I FOR SCIENCE MAJORS

Focuses on the unity of life: its biochemical and cellular makeup and functions, the acquisition and utilization of energy, and the storage and utilization of genetic information. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee. CO-REQUISITE(S): Recommended: CHE 130 and CHE 131.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 192

GENERAL BIOLOGY II FOR SCIENCE MAJORS

Introduction to evolution, ecology, organismal development and diversity. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 and BIO 191 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 193

GENERAL BIOLOGY III FOR SCIENCE MAJORS

Deals primarily with diversity and development within the plant and animal kingdoms including basic principles of physiology. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 and BIO 192 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 130

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I

This introductory course for science majors emphasizes the composition of matter, atomic and molecular structure, bonding and chemical reactions. It is the first in the three-course sequence of General Chemistry. This course meets for three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 131.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or (CHE 128 and CHE 129) is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 131

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY

Laboratory course to be taken in conjunction with CHE 130. The course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE130. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE130. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or (CHE 128 and CHE 129) is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 132

GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

Second course of three in the General Chemistry series. Topics discussed include: common states of matter, phase transitions, properties of solutions, kinetics and equilibrium. This course meets for three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE133.
Prerequisites:
CHE 130 and CHE 131 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 133

GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 132. The Course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques learned in lab provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE132. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 132. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
CHE 130 and 131 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 134

GENERAL CHEMISTRY III

Third of three courses in the General Chemistry sequence. Topics included in lecture: chemical equilibrium in aqueous solution (acids and bases, solubility, complex ion formation), Thermodynamics (entropy and free energy), electrochemistry, chemistry of d-block elements and descriptive chemistry. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE135.
Prerequisites:
CHE 132 and CHE 133 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 135

GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY III

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 134. The Course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE134. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 134. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
CHE 132 and CHE 133 are a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 150

GENERAL PHYSICS I

This course provides a comprehensive, non-calculus introduction to physics. Vectors, forces, Newtonia mechanics of translational and rotational motion. This course is intended for life science and health science majors. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or above is a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 151

GENERAL PHYSICS II

Continuation of PHY 150. Topics include heat, thermodynamics, sound and light. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
PHY 150 or PHY 170 is a prerequisite for this class

PHY 152

GENERAL PHYSICS III

Continuation of PHY 151. Topics include electricity, magnetism and modern physics. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
PHY 151 or PHY 172 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 215

ECOLOGY

Study of organismal interactions; responses of individuals, populations and natural communities to their external environment. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 193 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 216

EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE

This course focuses on three of the great spheres of the Earth (lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere) and how they interact with the biosphere to create an integrated Earth system with an emphasis on how human activities impact important earth system cycles. Students should have a basic understanding of how living organisms interact with their physical environment. Laboratory activities provide experience with the tools and methodology of systems thinking. Lab fee applies.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 217

HUMAN IMPACTS ON THE ENVIRONMENT

A science-based course that examines the interface between humans and the living and non-living environment, the consequences of these interactions, and options for mitigating environmental impacts.

ENV 260

ENVIRONMENTAL DATA ANALYSIS

This course provides an overview of the biometrical techniques employed in the analysis of environmental data. Topics include: handling of data, experimental designs, testing for differences between an experimental and a control group, testing for differences among many groups, and determining trends in data. Data from the environmental sciences is used throughout, and students are introduced to appropriate software for data analysis.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 294

SECOND YEAR SEMINAR

The purpose of this course is to advance ecological literacy. The seminar presents the study of the environmental to students in a philosophical, cultural, and historical context, and in addition makes them aware of some foundational ideas of the discipline through a selection of new and classic literature. 2 quarter hours.

ENV 350

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND STUDIES CAPSTONE

This course examines basic core concepts of and current issues in environmental science drawing on perspectives of the liberal studies curriculum, including reflectiveness, value consciousness, critical and creative thinking, and a multicultural perspective. Senior standing in Environmental Science or Environmental Studies.
Prerequisites:
Status as a senior Environmental Studies or Environmental Science major is a prerequisite for this class.

INTC 326

ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS AND RHETORIC

Rhetorical perspective on environmental public discourse. Course also explores the relationship between rhetorically constituted ideas about nature and the development of political and social ideas, institutions, and practices that inform our understanding of the human place in the environment. (Formerly CMNS 326)

ENV 152

ECOLOGICAL AND SOCIAL ECONOMICS

In this course, students examine the role of the environment and natural resources in neoclassical, environmental and ecological economics. First, students study mechanisms for efficiently allocating scarce resources among specific alternative ends and take a brief foray into environmental economics and learn methods of resource/environmental valuation. We also discuss aspects of macroeconomics as it pertains to ecological economics. Students come away able to critically assess the benefits and drawbacks of these three ways that the economy incorporates the environment. It also encourages ethical reasoning as we discuss distribution of environmental benefits over generations and globally.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 204

ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

This course is designed to provide students with the scientific tools necessary to understand and critically evaluate both personal and policy decisions regarding the variety of options (e.g. fossil fuel, solar, wind, etc.) for energy generation and use. The course also focuses on the environmental impacts of all forms of energy, from the extraction of fossil fuels and mineral resources from the earth, to the generation, distribution and consumption of energy, and ultimately emission of fossil fuel combustion products, notably carbon dioxide and other heat trapping gasses, to the atmosphere. Course fee applies.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 230

GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE

This course introduces the student to the general principles of climate change and how it affects weather, agriculture, ocean levels, etc. In recent years, the problem of global climate change became one of the most important issues in science and politics. This course will cover topics like natural and human made climate changes, the handling of proxy data and data methods, and social behavior.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 300

PLANT IDENTIFICATION

An in-depth overview of plant families and species in the Chicagoland area. Lectures will focus on morphology of plants, evolutionary relationships among plant families, and terminology of plant structures. Students will use botanical keys and manuals for the area to identify plants and will learn collection techniques. Plant species will be collected in their natural habitats during field trips. Lab fee applies.
Prerequisites:
ENV 250 or BIO 215 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 310

ENVIRONMENTAL SOIL SCIENCE

An examination of the physical, chemical, biological and engineering properties of soils, their genesis and classification, how they function as sites of waste disposal, and their role in global agricultural production. The course includes a three-hour lab and a mandatory Saturday field trip. Lab fee applies.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 316

CHEMISTRY OF EARTH SYSTEMS

This class focuses on the impact of pollution on the Earth's ability to provide clean air, water and food for human consumption. The industrialization of the economy during the last 150 years has greatly increased the amount of waste that is sent into the four Earth spheres: the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. These emissions directly harm organisms and also cycle back to pollute essential ecosystem services provided by the Earth. This class will consider the source, transport, transformation and ultimate fate of pollution emitted into the air, water and solid Earth. Examples will include relatively simple cases (agricultural pesticides harming birds) and range to more complex interactions (depletion of stratospheric ozone by CFCs and the increase in harmful ultraviolet radiation). The laboratory component will be project based and some work can be completed outside of the assigned lab time. Lab fee applies
Prerequisites:
ENV 216 and CHE 132 are a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 320

CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

Conservation biology is an interdisciplinary endeavor concerned with the protection and management of biodiversity. It employs insights from the biological sciences, from the theory and practice of natural resource management, as well as from the social sciences and humanities. The reach of the discipline is vast; ranging across all organismal groups and the landscapes and processes that sustain them; we will therefore restrict ourselves to a general overview and draw upon a series of case studies in Chicago area. Lab fee applies.
Prerequisites:
BIO 215 or ENV 250 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 322

ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY

This course will introduce students to the conceptual and methodological tools of ecosystem ecology. The course will focus on understanding the fundamental structure and function of ecosystems but will also address very recent debates on the economic value of ecosystem services, the role of biological diversity in maintaining ecosystem processes, and the consequences of stressed and degraded ecosystems for human welfare. Finally, we assess the role of ecosystem ecology in designing sustainable restoration projects. The course includes a weekly lab.
Prerequisites:
BIO 215 or ENV 250 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 340

URBAN ECOLOGY

In this course we examine the way ecological ideas can increase our understanding of cities in ways that assist us in making cities more habitable - cleaner, healthier and more biodiverse. We will pay considerable attention to the ways in which ecology can be broadened by its encounter with disciplines that have historically paid more attention to the city ? urban sociology, anthropology, economics, demography, architecture and planning.This course has a required lab; some Saturday field trips.
Prerequisites:
BIO 215 or ENV 250 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 345

URBAN AGRICULTURE

This course will acquaint students with the challenges, opportunities, practices, and transformative potential of urban agriculture. Taking an interdisciplinary, integrative, case-study approach, this course will explore issues such as food access, food security, food deserts, community gardening, farmers markets, locavore food movement, entrepreneurial aspects of urban agriculture, method of food production, community nutrition, and food consumption patterns. The course will meet both in the classroom and on-site at an urban farm, where students will work in all aspects of the farm as well as learn to organize communities in an effort to help them create food security and access to healthy food systems.

ENV 355

INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

Study of the environment factors that influence health. Topics include air and water pollution, global population and local community dynamics, toxicology, infectious and chemical agents, radiation, and management.
Prerequisites:
ENV 250 or BIO 215 is a prerequisite for this class.