Course Requirements

Senior Thesis

Students in the B.S. in Environmental Science degree program do a research project leading to a senior thesis.  This is a distinctive feature of the major and allows students to have valuable, direct experience in the field of environmental science. 

Open Electives 

Open elective credit also is required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours.  

ENV 250

APPLIED ECOLOGY

An examination of how ecological principles are applied in order to understand and improve the relationship between humans and the natural environment. Cannot receive credit for both ENV 250 and BIO 215. Lab fee applies.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 215

ECOLOGY

Study of organismal interactions; responses of individuals, populations and natural communities to their external environment. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 193 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 216

EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE

This course focuses on three of the great spheres of the Earth (lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere) and how they interact with the biosphere to create an integrated Earth system with an emphasis on how human activities impact important earth system cycles. Students should have a basic understanding of how living organisms interact with their physical environment. Laboratory activities provide experience with the tools and methodology of systems thinking. Lab fee applies.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 217

HUMAN IMPACTS ON THE ENVIRONMENT

A science-based course that examines the interface between humans and the living and non-living environment, the consequences of these interactions, and options for mitigating environmental impacts.

ENV 260

ENVIRONMENTAL DATA ANALYSIS

This course provides an overview of the biometrical techniques employed in the analysis of environmental data. Topics include: handling of data, experimental designs, testing for differences between an experimental and a control group, testing for differences among many groups, and determining trends in data. Data from the environmental sciences is used throughout, and students are introduced to appropriate software for data analysis.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 206

BIOSTATISTICS

A survey of a variety of statistical methods used to analyze biological data.
Prerequisites:
BIO 193 or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 294

SECOND YEAR SEMINAR

The purpose of this course is to advance ecological literacy. The seminar presents the study of the environmental to students in a philosophical, cultural, and historical context, and in addition makes them aware of some foundational ideas of the discipline through a selection of new and classic literature. 2 quarter hours.

ENV 350

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND STUDIES CAPSTONE

This course examines basic core concepts of and current issues in environmental science drawing on perspectives of the liberal studies curriculum, including reflectiveness, value consciousness, critical and creative thinking, and a multicultural perspective. Senior standing in Environmental Science or Environmental Studies.
Prerequisites:
Status as a senior Environmental Studies or Environmental Science major is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 360

RESEARCH METHODS

ENV 360 is intended for junior year Environmental Science majors who are preparing for their senior research projects. Topics include nature and philosophy of science, experimental design, statistical analysis and scientific writing, focusing on common concerns and pitfalls of the environmental science researcher. Students develop a literature base and thesis proposal on a topic to be determined in the first weeks of the course.

ENV 362

SENIOR THESIS

ENV 362 is designed for Environmental Science students working on their senior thesis. 2 quarter credits.
Prerequisites:
ENV 360 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 300

PLANT IDENTIFICATION

An in-depth overview of plant families and species in the Chicagoland area. Lectures will focus on morphology of plants, evolutionary relationships among plant families, and terminology of plant structures. Students will use botanical keys and manuals for the area to identify plants and will learn collection techniques. Plant species will be collected in their natural habitats during field trips. Lab fee applies.
Prerequisites:
ENV 250 or BIO 215 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 310

ENVIRONMENTAL SOIL SCIENCE

An examination of the physical, chemical, biological and engineering properties of soils, their genesis and classification, how they function as sites of waste disposal, and their role in global agricultural production. The course includes a three-hour lab and a mandatory Saturday field trip. Lab fee applies.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 315

PLANT ECOLOGY

This course focuses on how plants are affected by abiotic factors in the environment and interactions with other organisms. Goals are to improve students' abilities to understand research papers, present overviews of current research, design experiments, and analyze data. The course includes weekly labs with greenhouse experiments or field trips followed by data analysis. Topics include germination ecology, pollination biology, competition between plants, and effects of herbivory. Lab fee applies.
Prerequisites:
ENV 250 or BIO 215 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 316

CHEMISTRY OF EARTH SYSTEMS

This class focuses on the impact of pollution on the Earth's ability to provide clean air, water and food for human consumption. The industrialization of the economy during the last 150 years has greatly increased the amount of waste that is sent into the four Earth spheres: the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. These emissions directly harm organisms and also cycle back to pollute essential ecosystem services provided by the Earth. This class will consider the source, transport, transformation and ultimate fate of pollution emitted into the air, water and solid Earth. Examples will include relatively simple cases (agricultural pesticides harming birds) and range to more complex interactions (depletion of stratospheric ozone by CFCs and the increase in harmful ultraviolet radiation). The laboratory component will be project based and some work can be completed outside of the assigned lab time. Lab fee applies
Prerequisites:
ENV 216 and CHE 132 are a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 320

CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

Conservation biology is an interdisciplinary endeavor concerned with the protection and management of biodiversity. It employs insights from the biological sciences, from the theory and practice of natural resource management, as well as from the social sciences and humanities. The reach of the discipline is vast; ranging across all organismal groups and the landscapes and processes that sustain them; we will therefore restrict ourselves to a general overview and draw upon a series of case studies in Chicago area. Lab fee applies.
Prerequisites:
BIO 215 or ENV 250 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 322

ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY

This course will introduce students to the conceptual and methodological tools of ecosystem ecology. The course will focus on understanding the fundamental structure and function of ecosystems but will also address very recent debates on the economic value of ecosystem services, the role of biological diversity in maintaining ecosystem processes, and the consequences of stressed and degraded ecosystems for human welfare. Finally, we assess the role of ecosystem ecology in designing sustainable restoration projects. The course includes a weekly lab.
Prerequisites:
BIO 215 or ENV 250 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 340

URBAN ECOLOGY

In this course we examine the way ecological ideas can increase our understanding of cities in ways that assist us in making cities more habitable - cleaner, healthier and more biodiverse. We will pay considerable attention to the ways in which ecology can be broadened by its encounter with disciplines that have historically paid more attention to the city ? urban sociology, anthropology, economics, demography, architecture and planning.This course has a required lab; some Saturday field trips.
Prerequisites:
BIO 215 or ENV 250 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 345

URBAN AGRICULTURE

This course will acquaint students with the challenges, opportunities, practices, and transformative potential of urban agriculture. Taking an interdisciplinary, integrative, case-study approach, this course will explore issues such as food access, food security, food deserts, community gardening, farmers markets, locavore food movement, entrepreneurial aspects of urban agriculture, method of food production, community nutrition, and food consumption patterns. The course will meet both in the classroom and on-site at an urban farm, where students will work in all aspects of the farm as well as learn to organize communities in an effort to help them create food security and access to healthy food systems.

ENV 355

INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

Study of the environment factors that influence health. Topics include air and water pollution, global population and local community dynamics, toxicology, infectious and chemical agents, radiation, and management.
Prerequisites:
ENV 250 or BIO 215 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 191

GENERAL BIOLOGY I FOR SCIENCE MAJORS

Focuses on the unity of life: its biochemical and cellular makeup and functions, the acquisition and utilization of energy, and the storage and utilization of genetic information. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee. CO-REQUISITE(S): Recommended: CHE 130 and CHE 131.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 192

GENERAL BIOLOGY II FOR SCIENCE MAJORS

Introduction to evolution, ecology, organismal development and diversity. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 and BIO 191 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 193

GENERAL BIOLOGY III FOR SCIENCE MAJORS

Deals primarily with diversity and development within the plant and animal kingdoms including basic principles of physiology. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 and BIO 192 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 130

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I

This introductory course for science majors emphasizes the composition of matter, atomic and molecular structure, bonding and chemical reactions. It is the first in the three-course sequence of General Chemistry. This course meets for three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 131.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or (CHE 128 and CHE 129) is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 131

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY

Laboratory course to be taken in conjunction with CHE 130. The course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE130. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE130. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or (CHE 128 and CHE 129) is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 132

GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

Second course of three in the General Chemistry series. Topics discussed include: common states of matter, phase transitions, properties of solutions, kinetics and equilibrium. This course meets for three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE133.
Prerequisites:
CHE 130 and CHE 131 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 133

GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 132. The Course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques learned in lab provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE132. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 132. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
CHE 130 and 131 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 134

GENERAL CHEMISTRY III

Third of three courses in the General Chemistry sequence. Topics included in lecture: chemical equilibrium in aqueous solution (acids and bases, solubility, complex ion formation), Thermodynamics (entropy and free energy), electrochemistry, chemistry of d-block elements and descriptive chemistry. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE135.
Prerequisites:
CHE 132 and CHE 133 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 135

GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY III

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 134. The Course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE134. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 134. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
CHE 132 and CHE 133 are a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 147

CALCULUS WITH INTEGRATED PRECALCULUS I

Limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, and applications, with precalculus review included for each topic. The full MAT 147-8-9 sequence covers all the material of MAT 150-1-2 plus additional precalculus material.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or equivalents or placement by test is a prerequisite for this course.

MAT 150

CALCULUS I

Limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, extrema, curve sketching, and optimization. This course meets for an additional 1.5-hour lab session each week for enrichment and problem solving.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this course.

MAT 170

CALCULUS I WITH SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS

The course covers the following topics using examples from the sciences: Functions as models, logarithmic scale graphing, exponential growth and decay, difference equations and limits of sequences, geometric series, functions and limits, trigonometric functions and their limits, continuity, limits at infinity, the derivative, differentiation rules, derivatives of trigonometric and exponential functions, related rates, derivatives of inverse and logarithm functions. Course meets for an additional lab session each week during which time students will work on applied mathematics projects based on the topics covered in the course. Students majoring in the sciences should consult with their major department to decide between the 160 and 170 sequences.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 148

CALCULUS WITH INTEGRATED PRECALCULUS II

Extrema, curve sketching, related rates, definite and indefinite integrals, applications of the integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, with precalculus review included for each topic.
Prerequisites:
MAT 147 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 151

CALCULUS II

Definite and indefinite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, applications of the integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse trigonometric functions, techniques of integration. This course meets for an additional 1.5-hour lab session each week for enrichment and problem solving.
Prerequisites:
MAT 150 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 171

CALCULUS II WITH SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS

The course covers the following topics using examples from the sciences: Applications of the derivative including approximation and local linearity, differentials, extrema and the Mean Value Theorem, monotonicity and concavity, extrema, inflection points, graphing, L'Hospital's Rule, optimization, and the Newton-Raphson method, antiderivaties, the definite integral, Riemann sums, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, area, cumulative change, average value of a function, and techniques of integration: substitution rule and integration by parts. Course meets for an additional lab session each week during which time students will work on applied mathematics projects based on the topics covered in the course. Course meets for an additional lab session each week during which time students will work on applied mathematics projects based on the topics covered in the course.
Prerequisites:
MAT 150 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 149

CALCULUS WITH INTEGRATED PRECALCULUS III

Techniques of integration, L'Hopital's rule, improper integrals, Taylor polynomials, series and sequences, first-order differential equations, with precalculus review included for each topic.
Prerequisites:
MAT 148 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 152

CALCULUS III

L'Hopital's rule, improper integrals, sequences and series, Taylor polynomials. This course meets for an additional 1.5-hour lab session each week for enrichment and problem solving.
Prerequisites:
MAT 151 or MAT 161 or MAT 171 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 172

CALCULUS III WITH DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

This course is designed for students in the life sciences and covers some topics from MAT 152, differential equations and an introduction to the Calculus of functions of several variables. Specific topics are as follows. Numerical integration, partial fraction expansions, Taylor approximations of a function, differential equations, separation of variables, slope fields, Euler's existence theorem, polygonal approximations to solutions of differential equations, the logistic equation and allometric growth models, equilibiria of differential equations and their stability, applications of stability theory, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, directional derivative and the gradient. Course meets for an additional lab session each week during which time students will work on applied mathematics projects based on the topics covered in the course.
Prerequisites:
MAT 151 or MAT 161 or MAT 171 is a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 150

GENERAL PHYSICS I

This course provides a comprehensive, non-calculus introduction to physics. Vectors, forces, Newtonia mechanics of translational and rotational motion. This course is intended for life science and health science majors. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or above is a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 151

GENERAL PHYSICS II

Continuation of PHY 150. Topics include heat, thermodynamics, sound and light. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
PHY 150 or PHY 170 is a prerequisite for this class

PHY 152

GENERAL PHYSICS III

Continuation of PHY 151. Topics include electricity, magnetism and modern physics. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
PHY 151 or PHY 172 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 210

MICROBIOLOGY

Biology of microorganisms with emphasis on viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 191 and MAT 130 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 235

EVOLUTION

This lecture/laboratory course will examine basic selection, population genetics, development, speciation, extinction, systematics, and the history of evolution. In the lab, students will learn some of the modern research methods used in the study of evolution. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 191, BIO 192 and BIO 193 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 260

GENETICS

Transmission of heritable traits, nature of genetic material, manner of its expression, its mutability, and its significance with respect to organismal and species variation. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 191 and BIO 193 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 317

AQUATIC BIOLOGY

The study of biological, physical and chemical phenomena in freshwater environments. Emphasis on organisms and their ecology. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 191, BIO 192, BIO 193 and BIO 215 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 321

MOLECULAR METHODS IN ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION

This course will provide hands-on experience in methods of detecting and analyzing molecular variation in nature. By the end of the course, students should be competent employing molecular markers to answer a wide variety of basic questions in ecology and evolution.
Prerequisites:
BIO 215 or BIO 235 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 350

ANIMAL ADAPTATIONS

An introduction to the ecological concept of adaptation. Adaptation is defined and illustrated using specific animal examples. Discussion will focus on how these specializations in structure and function equip the animal for survival.
Prerequisites:
Junior or senior Biology standing or consent of instructor.

CHE 230

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I

First in a sequence of courses designed to investigate what organic chemistry is and how it works, by emphasizing the relationship between structure and function of organic molecule and the language and fundamental concepts of organic chemistry, including: structure and bonding; acid-base reactions; functional groups; thermodynamics and kinetics of organic reactions; stereochemistry; substitution and elimination reactions of alkyl halides. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE231.
Prerequisites:
(CHE 134 and CHE 135) or (CHE 138 and CHE 139) are prerequisites for this class.

CHE 231

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE230. CO-REQUISTE(S): CHE 230. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
(CHE 134 and CHE 135) or (CHE 138 and CHE 139) are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 232

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

Second in a sequence of courses designed to investigate what organic chemistry is and how it works, by emphasizing the relationship between structure and function of organic molecules. Specific topics investigated include the reactivity and synthesis of alcohols, ethers, epoxides, alkenes, alkynes, alkanes, conjugated, and aromatic compounds. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE233
Prerequisites:
CHE 230 and CHE 231 are prerequisites for this class..

CHE 233

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE232. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 232. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
CHE 230 and CHE 231 are prerequisites for this class..

CHE 234

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY III

Third in a sequence of courses designed to investigate what organic chemistry is and how it works, by emphasizing the relationship between structure and function of organic molecules. Specific topics investigated include the reactivity and synthesis of carbonyl compounds; amines; and bio-molecules. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE235.
Prerequisites:
CHE 232 and CHE 233 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 235

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY III

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE234. CO-REQUISITE(S):CHE 234. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
CHE 232 and CHE 233 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 204

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Use of equilibrium chemistry to solve problems of chemical analysis in acid-base, solubility, metal-ligand complex, and electrochemical systems. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 202 and CHE205.
Prerequisites:
(CHE 134 and CHE 135) or (CHE 138 and CHE 139) are prerequisites for this class.

CHE 205

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE205. Methods include wet chemistry and instrumental techniques of analysis. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 204. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
(CHE 134 and CHE 135) or (CHE 138 and CHE 139) are prerequisites for this class.

CHE 264

ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY

Atmospheric chemistry with a focus on physical and chemical processes in the troposphere and stratosphere. CO-REQUISITE(S):CHE265.
Prerequisites:
CHE 204 and CHE 205 are prerequisites for this course.

CHE 265

ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 264, with emphasis placed on gas phase and particulate measurements. CO-REQUISITE(S):CHE264. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
CHE 204 and CHE 205 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 268

SOLID WASTE CHEMISTRY

Fundamental chemical processes involved in the processing of solid wastes. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE269.
Prerequisites:
CHE 204 and CHE 205 are prerequisites for this course.

CHE 269

SOLID WASTE CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 268. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 268. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
CHE 204 and CHE 205 are prerequisites for this course.

CHE 340

BIOCHEMISTRY I

First in a three-course sequence, directed at those who wish an in- depth exploration of modern biochemistry. This course covers the structures and functions of the four major macromolecules, concentrating on enzyme kinetics and regulation. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE341. The general biology sequence is strongly recommended.
Prerequisites:
(CHE232 and 233) or (CHE238 and 239) are prerequisites for this course.

CHE 341

EXPERIMENTAL BIOCHEMISTRY I

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE340. This course will introduce classic and modern techniques for isolating and characterizing biological molecules. Topics covered will include buffer preparation; amino acid analysis; detection, quantification, and purification of proteins; enzyme kinetics; purification, amplification, and analysis of DNA; protein stabilization; and molecular interaction analysis. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 340. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
(CHE232 and 233) or (CHE238 and 239) are prerequisites for this course.

GEO 240

HISTORY OF CARTOGRAPHY

The course explores the history of mapmaking as a dimension and expression of the intellectual, scientific, technological, and political transformation of society. Focusing primarily on Europe and North America, the course covers the prevailing schools of thought and practitioners, and the structures and forces that shaped them. The course includes hands-on study of archival quality maps in DePaul's Special Collections and other regional institutions. Short field trip to the Newberry Library required.

GEO 241

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS I

An introductory-level course covering the fundamentals of GIS. Topics include GPS, remote sensing, data models (vector and raster), coordinate systems, and map design. Instruction is accomplished through lectures and hands-on computer lab exercises using ArcGIS.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course,

GEO 242

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS II: COMMUNITY GIS

An intermediate-level course. Students conduct real-world GIS projects for community organizations in Chicagoland. Topics include data capture, manipulation, database design, data quality, and spatial analysis. Students will complete projects following best practices of GIS project management. Instruction is accomplished through lectures and hands-on computer lab exercises using ArcGIS.
Prerequisites:
GEO 241 is a prerequisite for this class.

GEO 243

REMOTE SENSING

An introduction to the fundamentals of remote sensing, the analysis of the earth through air or space borne sensors. Special topics include image interpretation, image processing, urban change analysis, environmental monitoring, and photogrammetry. Instruction is accomplished through lectures and hands-on lab exercises using ArcGIS Desktop. A comprehensive final project using techniques learned from your work completes the course.
Prerequisites:
LSP 120 or HON 180 or (MAT 130 or above) or instructor permission is a prerequisite for this course,

ENV 344

ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AND ADVOCACY

This course explores the roles of individuals and organizations in advocacy through the lens of environmental justice, particularly as power arrangements facilitate or impede consensus building. The course examines how legislation is written and how this process has impacted communities of color. Special attention is paid to advocacy techniques such as lobbying, movement-building, public education and litigation.
Prerequisites:
ENV 217 is a prerequisite for this class.

ENV 359

ECOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING

Introduction to mathematical models commonly used in ecological and environmental science. Students will learn the basics of modeling with sufficient depth to critically evaluate models in the literature and to construct and analyze novel models of ecological or environmental phenomenon of their choosing.

ENV 390

SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Variable topics.

BIO 315

TOPICS IN ECOLOGY

The focus of this course is to read and critique classic papers in ecology and to connect their foundational ideas with modern research and understanding.
Prerequisites:
BIO 191, BIO 192, BIO 193 and BIO 215 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 318

FIELD STUDIES IN MARINE AND ESTUARINE BIOLOGY

This course is designed for science majors with an interest in marine and estuarine biology and will examine this subject from an ecological perspective. The primary objectives of the course are: 1) to explore the diversity of marine and estuarine life; 2) to understand the manner in which physical and biological factors influence biological diversity in marine systems; 3) to understand the role that humans play in shaping these dynamics; and 4) to develop professional connections and gain real-life experiences in marine science.
Prerequisites:
BIO 191, BIO 192, BIO 193 and (BIO 215 or BIO 235) or instructor consent are a prerequisite for this class.