​The combined Bachelor's/Master's degree programs allow students to complete 12 graduate credit hours while still undergraduates. These three graduate level courses will count toward both the undergraduate and graduate degree programs.

​Physics (BS)/Secondary  Education Physics (MEd)

This combined degree program of the College of Science and Health and the College of Education was collaboratively developed, and is governed and taught by faculty from these units. 

Students may apply to the Program during the spring of their junior year. They must enroll in the Junior Year Experiential Learning course, TCH 320 and meet other application criteria; these include completion of at least 16 quarter credit hours at DePaul and a 3.0 GPA.  During their senior year, students are required to complete a Program capstone course, TCH 390, and three 400-level courses that count toward both their undergraduate and graduate degrees:

Physics Content Area (grades of C or better required for licensure):
The following physics content area requirements are required. These can be taken as part of the major, liberal studies or open elective requirements:

The Master’s year comprises teacher-preparation coursework that culminates with student teaching during Spring quarter.  Upon graduation and the fulfilling of State of Illinois Certification Licensure requirements (which may require some additional course work in the student’s major and related fields), students are eligible to be licensed to teach Physics at the 6th-12th grade levels.  

A full description of the Program can be found on the College of Education website in the graduate course catalog.  Students interested in the Program should consult with the designated TEACH Program advisor in their home department. 

TCH 401

TEACHING AS A PROFESSION IN SECONDARY SCHOOL

This course is an introduction to the TEACH Program, including the College of Education's conceptual framework and teacher dispositions, and to the professional world of secondary school teaching, including the policy bodies and stakeholders that impact teaching. Within this developing understanding of the larger context of secondary education, students will begin to articulate clearly professional identities and the behaviors inherent in those identities, including their impact on student learning. Drawing on previous coursework and their growing understanding of differences in individual, ethnic, and cultural group attitudes, values, and needs, students also will learn to recognize the complexities of teaching and learning in a pluralistic society. Ultimately, students will be committed to teaching as a responsible professional who acts in an ethical and collegial fashion. 25 Level 2 field experience required. Offered during Fall term only.

TCH 414

THE NATURE OF SCIENCE

This course is about the nature of science and the interactions between science and society. It will build on the foundation of understandings that students already have about the processes and conventions of science developed through their years as science students to create opportunities for deeper understandings of the beliefs and assumptions inherent to the creation of scientific knowledge. These opportunities will be developed through direct interactions with professional scientists as well as through case studies and readings that illustrate the strengths, limits and pitfalls of the scientific endeavor as well as provide opportunities for students to relate science to their daily lives and interests and to a larger framework of human endeavor and understanding (e.g., relationships among systems of human endeavor including science and technology; relationships among scientific, technological, personal, social and cultural values). Cases will be drawn from different scientific disciplines as well as from modern and historic times. In this way, science students will have a better understanding of what it means to be a scientist and how science interfaces with society. The course is a prerequisite for TCH 424. Offered during Winter term only.

TCH 424

INQUIRY & APPLICATION IN DEVELOPING SECONDARY SCIENCE PEDAGOGY

Following TCH 414, this course transitions from asking "what does a scientist do?" to a consideration of why science literacy in the general public has been so difficult to achieve. The focusing questions for TCH 424 are: "How do we teach science? What is science literacy? Why is an understanding of science important to the general public? and What are the major obstacles and strategies to achieving science literacy?" The course begins by participants self-reflecting on their own educational experiences that led to their paths in science education: what have been their successful learning strategies, how have teachers influenced their education and what have been successful (and less than successful) classroom instructional strategies? From this, students will begin science classroom observation, discussing their observations with their peers, and speaking with educators about their experiences teaching high school science and about the goals and short-comings of science education. Throughout this process, students will read seminal literature on science literacy and explore cases challenging their notions of the teacher-learner relationship and the relationship between science and society. As a result of this course, students will gain a deeper understanding of scientific literacy and the barriers to understanding and teaching science as well as identify what makes an exceptional science teacher able to prepare both future scientists and a knowledgeable public. 25 Level 1 Field Experience hours required. Offered during Spring term.

TCH 320

EXPLORING TEACHING IN THE URBAN HIGH SCHOOL

(JYEL CREDIT) This course is an invitation to secondary education as a profession, an opportunity for students considering education as a career to explore the reality of teaching and learning a disciplinary content area in a variety of Chicago-area schools. Students will become familiar with different narratives of teaching through teacher and student biographies, testimonials, literature, film, and classroom observations. They will explore the interrelationships between, for example, popular cultural beliefs about schooling; teacher and student identities; and classroom interaction. The instructor will coordinate observations in several classrooms as the basis for intensive, guided reflective work, aimed at supporting students' initial and subsequent efforts of developing identities as disciplinary content educators (25 hours of high school classroom observation required). Course is also an introduction to the TEACH Program. Offered during Fall, Winter, and Spring terms.

TCH 390

CAPSTONE: INTEGRATING EDUCATION & DISCIPLINARY FOUNDATIONS

This course is designed to help students conceptualize issues and opportunities in teaching their disciplinary content to diverse students and in different classroom contexts. Up to ten hours of community-based service/observation required. In this course, students will analyze and reflect on how teaching in their disciplines is informed by diverse cultures of schooling and youth, including the influences of economic, social, cultural, political, gender, and religious factors on schooling, educational policy and opportunity. Students will use disciplinary content to critically and creatively reflect on the teaching of that content in secondary schools. Students will be introduced to issues and ways of presenting essential disciplinary content in ways that engage diverse learners, including learners who have not been served well by formal education. Students will also develop a theory of teaching that emphasizes the intersection of disciplinary content with multicultural perspectives. Offered during Spring term only.

PHY 310

MECHANICS I

Newtonina motion in a one-, two-, and three-dimensional motion, conservative systems, variational principles, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, central-force problems.
Prerequisites:
PHY 300 is a prerequisite for this course.

MAT 261

MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS II

Lagrange multipliers, double and iterated integrals, area by double integrals, triple integrals, triple integrals in cylindrical and spherical coordinates, line integrals, vector fields, conservative vector fields and potential functions, Green?s Theorem, surface integrals, Stokes? Theorem, Gauss? Theorem.
Prerequisites:
MAT 260 is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 130

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I

This introductory course for science majors emphasizes the composition of matter, atomic and molecular structure, bonding and chemical reactions. It is the first in the three-course sequence of General Chemistry. This course meets for three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 131.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or (CHE 128 and CHE 129) is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 131

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY

Laboratory course to be taken in conjunction with CHE 130. The course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE130. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE130. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or (CHE 128 and CHE 129) is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 132

GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

Second course of three in the General Chemistry series. Topics discussed include: common states of matter, phase transitions, properties of solutions, kinetics and equilibrium. This course meets for three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE133.
Prerequisites:
CHE 130 and CHE 131 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 133

GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 132. The Course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques learned in lab provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE132. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 132. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
CHE 130 and 131 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 134

GENERAL CHEMISTRY III

Third of three courses in the General Chemistry sequence. Topics included in lecture: chemical equilibrium in aqueous solution (acids and bases, solubility, complex ion formation), Thermodynamics (entropy and free energy), electrochemistry, chemistry of d-block elements and descriptive chemistry. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE135.
Prerequisites:
CHE 132 and CHE 133 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 135

GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY III

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 134. The Course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE134. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 134. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
CHE 132 and CHE 133 are a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 170

UNIVERSITY PHYSICS I

This course provides a comprehensive, calculus-based introduction to Newtonian mechanics. Topics include vectors, Newton's laws, linear and rotational motion. Course intended for majors in a physical science, required for the physics major. Laboratory fee. Autumn. COREQUISITE(S): MAT 147 or MAT 160 or MAT 170.
Prerequisites:
MAT 147 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a corequisite for this class.

PHY 171

UNIVERSITY PHYSICS II

A continuation of PHY 170. Topics include heat, sound and light. Laboratory fee. Winter COREQUISITE(S): MAT 161 or 171 or 148.
Prerequisites:
PHY 170 is a prerequisite for this course.

PHY 172

UNIVERSITY PHYSICS III

A continuation of PHY 171. Topics include electricity and magnetism. Laboratory fee. Spring COREQUISITE(S):MAT 162 or 172 or 149.
Prerequisites:
PHY 171 is a prerequisite for this course.

PHY 270

UNIVERSITY PHYSICS IV

An introduction to 20th-century physics. Topics include special relativity, quantum mechanics, and statistical analysis of data. Lab Fee Autumn
Prerequisites:
PHY 172 is a prerequisite for this course.

PHY 300

METHODS OF COMPUTATIONAL AND THEORETICAL PHYSICS I

Computational and theoretical methods in ordinary differential equations, complex numbers, systems of equations, phase plane analysis, bifurcations. Applications to damped, driven oscillators, electronics. Lab Fee Winter COREQUISITE(S):MAT 261.

PHY 301

METHODS OF COMPUTATIONAL AND THEORETICAL PHYSICS II

Fourier series, Fourier transforms, partial differential equations, Legendre polynomials, special functions. Applications to wave motion, electricity and magnetism, modern physics, optics. lab fee. Spring
Prerequisites:
PHY 300 is a prerequisite for this course.

MAT 160

CALCULUS FOR MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE MAJORS I

Limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, extrema, curve sketching, and optimization. Course meets for an additional 1.5 hour lab session each week in order to cover the material in greater depth. Students considering a math major are advised to take the 160 or 170 sequence.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 161

CALCULUS FOR MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE MAJORS II

Definite and indefinite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, applications of the integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse trigonometric functions, techniques of integration. Course meets for an additional 1.5 hour lab session each week in order to cover the material in greater depth.
Prerequisites:
MAT 150 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a prerequisite for this course.

MAT 162

CALCULUS FOR MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE MAJORS III

L'Hopital's rule, improper integrals, sequences and series, Taylor polynomials. Course meets for an additional 1.5 hour lab session each week in order to cover the material in greater depth.
Prerequisites:
MAT 151 or MAT 161 or MAT 171 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 260

MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS I

Vectors, dot and cross products, lines and planes, cylinders and quadric surfaces, vector-valued functions, parametrization of plane curves and three dimensional curves, arc length, curvature and normal vector, functions of several independent variables, partial derivatives, the chain rule, directional derivatives, differentials, extreme values.
Prerequisites:
MAT 149 or MAT 152 or MAT 162 or MAT 172 is a prerequisite for this class.