Course Requirements

Pre-Education Core: 16 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Mathematics for Elementary Teachers: 8 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Concentration Courses:  28 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

A concentration is a single area of study in liberal arts (cannot include coursework in Education). 

  • 100, 200, 300 level Concentration Course 1 
  • 100, 200, 300 level Concentration Course 1
  • 100, 200, 300 level Concentration Course 1
  • 200-300 level Concentration Course 1
  • 200-300 level Concentration Course 2
  • 200-300 level Concentration Course 3
  • 200-300 level Concentration Course 4

Possible concentrations areas include: Anthropology, Arabic, Art, Bilingual Education, Biology, Catholic Studies, Chemistry, Chinese, Communications, Economics, English, Environmental Science, ESL, French, Geography, General Science, German, History, Italian, Japanese, Language Arts, Math*, Philosophy, Physical Science, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Social Studies, Sociology or Spanish.

* Students pursuing a Math concentration are required to take:

Students in the math concentration will also take MAT 110 and MAT 111 as part of the elementary major.
 

Advanced Standing Education Courses: 44 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Open Electives: 4 quarter hours required

Open elective credit also is required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours.   The following cannot be used to fulfill an open elective: WRD 98WRD 101MAT 094, and MAT 95.​

Student Teaching: 12 quarter hours required, grade of B- or better required

Registration in student teaching requires completion of all requirements and procedures indicated in the college core section.  EDU 95 indicates to the Illinois State Board of Education that all field experience hours are complete.  All students also take EE 384, Capstone Experience with student teaching (listed in the Liberal Studies section).  

Licensure Tests 

All individuals licensed by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) are required to complete licensure tests specific to their teaching license.  Elementary majors must complete the following tests:

  • Test of Academic Proficiency (TAP) (test #400)  - assesses knowledge of reading comprehension, language arts, writing, and math.  Test is required to qualify for Advanced Standing. *Check with your advisor about qualifying for a waiver with acceptable ACT or SAT test scores.
  • Elementary Content Area Test (test #110) – assesses knowledge of the content of what is taught at the elementary level including language arts and literacy, mathematics, science, social science, the arts, health, and physical education.  Test is required before Student Teaching (deadlines apply).
  • Assessment of Professional Teaching (APT) (test #102, grades K-9) – assesses knowledge of teaching planning, delivery, assessment, professionalism, and technology.  Test is required to be licensed, recommended to be taken before Student Teaching.
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EDU 95

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH CHILDREN AND YOUTH

(no credit) Required of all students. Observations and participatory experience with children and youth in a school or agency. This course is a prerequisite for student teaching and related professional courses.

EE 385

ELEMENTARY STUDENT TEACHING

(12 credits) Five school days a week in supervised teaching in a cooperating school for a full academic quarter. Feedback and discussion of problems encountered in student teaching as well as new materials and techniques of student teaching. Application and approval required. Open only to DePaul students.

EE 384

CAPSTONE IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

The senior capstone course is designed to help students integrate the central emphases of their liberal learning studies curriculum into their professional behavior. It will provide prospective elementary educators with opportunities to engage in activities requiring them to be reflective, to consider value commitments, to engage in critical and creative thinking, and to examine their practice from a mulitcultural perspective as they discuss issues specific to elementary education. The course is grounded in the School of Education's framework for an Urban Professional Multicultural Educator, which also reflects the goals of the Liberal Studies Program. COREQUISITE(S): EE 385.

LSI 346

STRATEGIES FOR MAINSTREAMING AND INCLUSION

Focus will be on the practical problems related to the integration of exceptional children and youth into regular classrooms. Identification, characteristics, programs, curricular variations, and techniques for securing maximum development of students with a variety of special needs with emphasis on learning disabilities. The course also covers historical background, as well as current legal and service provision issues, including mainstreaming and inclusion. PREREQUISITE(S): Junior standing.
Prerequisites:
Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing is a prerequisite for this class.

EE 356

ASSESSMENT IN THE ELEMENTARY CLASSROOMS

This course focuses on study, use, and evaluation of assessment practices in diverse, K-8 contexts. Assessment is addressed as part of instructional systems, attending to issues including: the appropriate use of standardized measures, formal and informal classroom assessment, portfolio development, as well as reporting to all stakeholders. This course also emphasizes ways of involving students and parents in assessment processes, how to observe and assess children individually and in classroom settings, and the use of numerous technologies as components of a classroom assessment system.
Prerequisites:
EE 281, SCU 337 and (EE 324, EE 333, EE 334 or EE 355) and status as an Advanced Teacher Candidate is a prerequisite for this class.

EE 355

METHODS: CONTEMPORARY TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES

This course is an introduction to an integrated view of social studies for engaged citizenship. Thorough the study of strategies (such as concept formation, historical inquiry, role-play, etc), materials (such as primary sources) teacher candidates will apply principles of curricular integration to create curriculum/units that engage elementary learners in the exploration of issues, ideas, and perspectives that impact our world. Daytime clinical hours are required.
Prerequisites:
EE 281 and status as an Advanced Teacher Candidate is a prerequisite for this class.

EE 344

ART AND MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

This course focuses on the arts (visual art, music, drama and dance) as an integral component of teaching and learning in the elementary school curriculum. Students will explore a variety of art forms and disciplines to develop a critical aesthetic and artistic vocabulary. Students learn to help children utilize artistic media in the exploration and expression of thoughts and feelings. Emphasis is placed on design, construction, and implementation, and assessment of authentic conceptual classroom arts activities that integrate the arts with other classroom curricula. Daytime clinical hours (10) are required during this course.
Prerequisites:
EE 281 and status as an Advanced Teacher Candidate is a prerequisite for this class.

EE 334

ELEMENTARY SCIENCE INQUIRY TEACHING STRATEGIES

This course is an introduction to instructional strategies for helping students in grades K-8 become science literate: i.e., to understand the nature of science and its impact on the world. Particular attention will be given to theoretical views about how children learn science and develop scientific process skills, e.g., skills in observing, classifying, collecting and interpreting data and questioning strategies, and ways to assess student progress. Daytime clinical hours are required.
Prerequisites:
EE 281 and status as an Advanced Teacher Candidate is a prerequisite for this class.

EE 333

TEACHING AND LEARNING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL MATHEMATICS

This course is an introduction to materials, processes for developing, and strategies for mathematical literacy in grades K-8. Particular attention will be given to the theoretical views about how children learn mathematics, the proper use of manipulative materials, the development of mathematical thinking, e.g., skills in estimation, pattern recognition, or spatial perception; the use of technology, and ways to assess student progress. Daytime clinical hours are required. Note: MAT 111 may be taken as a prerequisite OR it may be taken concurrently with EE 333.
Prerequisites:
MAT 110 and EE 281 and Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing are a prerequisite for this class.

EE 326

READING/LANGUAGE ARTS IN INTERMEDIATE AND MIDDLE GRADES

This course extends Emerging Reading and Language Arts to facilitate increased independence in students as strategic readers and competent writers. It focuses on the further development of reading comprehension and writing abilities in the intermediate grades and middle school. Emphasis is placed on the complex nature of literacy addressing issues such as content-area literacies, learning in and across languages, and critically consuming and producing a wide variety of texts (including online, multimedia and print based). Application of course material is facilitated through the design, teaching, and reflection on literacy lesson(s) for intermediate learners in required field experiences.
Prerequisites:
EE 324 and EE 281 and status as an Advanced Masters Education student are a prerequisite for this class.

EE 324

READING/LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE EARLY YEARS

This course focuses on the curriculum content and sequence, instructional and assessment strategies as well as considerations integral to the creation of authentic, effective emergent literacy environments and engagements for pre-kindergarten through third grade. Theory and practice principles are woven into course assignments and required field experiences designed to observe, teach, and reflect upon instructional decisions made for individual as well as groups of children. Prevailing curricular and instructional models (e.g., code-based, meaning-oriented, balanced) and their histories are compared and contrasted. The influences of development, home language(s) and dialect(s) (especially those of U.S. metropolitan areas), and educational settings are studied and applied to candidate instructional planning and teaching. Case studies and lesson planning facilitate the application of course content.
Prerequisites:
(EE 281 or ECE 290) and status as an Advanced Teacher Candidate is a prerequisite for this class.

EE 317

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

The course is designed to promote an understanding of the contribution that Physical Education makes to the elementary school curriculum and the development of the whole child. Lesson planning, instructional delivery, and classroom management will be focused as students engage in 15-20 hours of supervised field experience teaching WHOLE classes of children in local schools.
Prerequisites:
EE 281 and status as an Advanced Teacher Candidate is a prerequisite for this class.

SCU 339

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY OF YOUTH AND MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION

This course introduces foundational and contemporary theories of youth and adolescent development. It provides an investigation of how these theoretical ideas relate to contemporary questions of youth and middle level education. The course explores the historical invention of adolescence, changing ideas about the meaning of childhood, as well as some of the broader social, economic, political, and cultural implications of these changing ideas. This course seeks to develop in prospective educators a broader capacity to theorize about youth and schooling and, hence, to act critically and reflectively in multiple contexts in which youth learn.
Prerequisites:
Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing is a prerequisite for this class.

SCU 338

THE PROCESS AND EVALUATION OF LEARNING

The process involved in human learning is examined from alternative theoretical and research paradigms and perspectives. The roles of emotions, cultural differences, social realities, cognitive uniqueness, character and achievement tendencies are examined with respect to learner functioning. Alternative methods and techniques for evaluating learner development and academic achievement are surveyed and discussed. Emphasis is placed upon identifying the characteristics of individually and culturally responsive and responsible testing and assessment protocols in the school setting.
Prerequisites:
Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing is a prerequisite for this class.

SCU 337

HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

This course is an introduction to the study of the process of human development from conception to old age. Through a range of theories, the periods of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood are examined with particular attention to the role of culture, gender, and class as they inform the contextualized process of growth and change across the life span.

SCU 336

ADOLESCENT AND ADULT GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Theories of development throughout adolescence including current issues of problems and growth crises in attaining maturation. The course also includes adult and aging life span considerations. Emphasis is placed on the role of the early childhood professional in interaction with adults in the lives of young children (i.e., parents, grandparents).

MAT 110

FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS I

This course gives students a deeper understanding of the foundations of elementary mathematics. Topics include problem solving, number systems, the decimal system, the number line, rounding, fractions, percentages, addition and subtraction.
Prerequisites:
MAT 101 or LSP 120 or equivalents or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 111

FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS II

This course gives students a deeper understanding of the foundations of elementary mathematics. Topics include problem solving, fractions, percentages, addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.
Prerequisites:
MAT 110 is a prerequisite for this class.

CSC 261

PROGRAMMING IN C++ I

This is an introductory course in computer programming covering basic data types, variables, flow of control, functions, and parameter passing, pointers and pass by reference, arrays, c strings and the C string library, basic input/output and structures. Examples in this course will concentrate on basic procedural algorithms for manipulating data.

CSC 211

PROGRAMMING IN JAVA I

Introduction to programming in Java and problem solving. Variables, data types, input/output, using objects and methods from the standard classes (such as String and Scanner), control structures, writing methods, arrays. Solving problems with algorithms and implementing algorithms in Java. (Not for CS majors)

MAT 348

APPLIED STATISTICAL METHODS

Introduction to statistical software (which will be used throughout the course). Descriptive statistics; elementary probability theory; discrete and continuous probability models; principles of statistical inference; Simple linear regression and correlation analysis.
Prerequisites:
MAT 148 or MAT 151 or MAT 161 or MAT 171 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 320

GEOMETRY I

Incidence and separation properties of planes; congruences; the parallel postulate; area theory; ruler and compass construction.
Prerequisites:
MAT 141 or MAT 215 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 303

THEORY OF NUMBERS

A study of properties of integers: divisibility; Euclid's Algorithm; congruences and modular arithmetic; Euler's Theorem; Diophantine equations; distribution of primes; RSA cryptography.
Prerequisites:
MAT 141 or MAT 215 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 301

HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS

History of mathematics with problem solving.
Prerequisites:
MAT 141 or MAT 215 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 215

INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL REASONING

An introduction to basic concepts and techniques used in higher mathematics courses: set theory, equivalence relations, functions, cardinality, techniques of proof in mathematics. The emphasis is on problem solving and proof construction by students. The department recommends that students take this course no later than the spring quarter of the sophomore year.
Prerequisites:
MAT 149 or MAT 152 or MAT 162 or MAT 172 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 152

CALCULUS III

L'Hopital's rule, improper integrals, sequences and series, Taylor polynomials. This course meets for an additional 1.5-hour lab session each week for enrichment and problem solving.
Prerequisites:
MAT 151 or MAT 161 or MAT 171 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 151

CALCULUS II

Definite and indefinite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, applications of the integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse trigonometric functions, techniques of integration. This course meets for an additional 1.5-hour lab session each week for enrichment and problem solving.
Prerequisites:
MAT 150 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 150

CALCULUS I

Limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, extrema, curve sketching, and optimization. This course meets for an additional 1.5-hour lab session each week for enrichment and problem solving.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this course.

EDU 25

BASIC TECHNOLOGY LITERACY

(0 Credit) This online course provides students with a knowledge about assembling, using, and troubleshooting basic technology hardware and software. In this course, students demonstrate understanding of basic computer setup and the use of peripheral devices such as printers, speakers, flash drives, scanners, digital cameras, videos, and computer software.

SCU 207

SOCIAL AND HISTORICAL ISSUES IN EDUCATION

This course examines through an interdisciplinary framework sociological and historical issues and concerns associated with the relationship between education and public life. The course analyzes education as a form of cultural power, addressing its political and ideological effects. Emphasis will be placed upon the social and historical meanings and purposes assigned to education, especially as it pertains to questions of race, gender, sexuality, and the political economy of class.

EE 281

INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE

This is the first in a sequence of theory and practice courses that serves to familiarize teaching candidates with the world of elementary and middle schools. Through observation and participation in schools, self-reflection, independently created assignments, cooperative learning assignments and classroom discussion, candidates will acquire familiarity with schools and classrooms including: social/cultural context, classroom climate, classroom management, curricular coherence, standards-based instruction, and teacher professional beliefs and practices. Written critical reflections and papers serve as initial foundation for the development of teaching philosophies. Required field experiences are integrated into this course.

EE 347

CHILDREN'S LITERATURE

This course familiarizes students with quality children's literature for infancy through young adulthood. Students will select, discuss, critique, and share books appropriate for this age span, focusing primarily on ages 5-14 years. The influences of child development, culture, technology, and education stakeholders (i.e., parents, students, teachers, administrators, and their community) on literature selection are emphasized. Students will develop skills in evaluating books, responding to books, and using literature across the curriculum.

PE 206

PERSONAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH

This course is designed to assist students in gaining insight into their health/wellness attitudes, behaviors, and choices. Health/wellness experiences and topics examine the total wellness concept, as a self-designed, dynamic style of living which focuses on optimal functioning and quality of life. Emphasis is placed on the physical, emotional, intellectual, social, occupational and spiritual dimensions of health/wellness.

PE 273

HEALTH AND NUTRITION

This course will provide students with an introductory background in nutrition throughout the life span. The study of foods and their effects upon health, development and performance of the individual will be emphasized. Software analysis of dietary intakes will facilitate an individual reflective approach to an application of the content.