Course Requirements

Content Area Courses

Biology Core: 28 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Biology Electives: 12 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Biology electives cannot include courses designated as scientific inquiry.  A minimum of 2 lab courses are required.

  • BIO elective course
  • BIO elective course with lab
  • BIO elective course with lab 

Mathematics Core: 8 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

General Chemistry Core: 12 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Organic Chemistry or Physics Series Core: 12 quarter hours required, grade of C- or better required

Pre-Education Introductory Courses: 20 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Advanced Standing Education Courses: 28 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Student Teaching : 10 quarter hours required, grade of B- or better required

Registration in student teaching requires completion of all requirements and procedures in the college core section.  EDU 095 indicates to the Illinois State Board of Education that all field experience hours are complete.  All students also take SEC 387, Capstone Seminar with student teaching (listed in the Liberal Studies section).

​​​​​​​​Licensure Tests

All individuals licensed by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) are required to complete licensure tests specific to their teaching license. Secondary Education Biology majors must complete the following tests:
 
  • Test of Academic Proficiency (TAP) (test #400) - assesses knowledge of reading comprehension, language arts, writing, and math.  Test is required to qualify for Advanced Standing. *Check with your advisor about qualifying for a waiver with acceptable ACT or SAT test scores.
  • Science: Biology Content Area Test (test #105) – assesses knowledge of both biological science and physical science.  Test is required before Student Teaching (deadlines apply)
  • Assessment of Professional Teaching (APT) (test #103, grade 6-12) – assesses knowledge of teaching planning, delivery, assessment, professionalism, and technology.  Test is required to be licensed; recommended to be taken before Student Teaching.  ​​
 

BIO 191

GENERAL BIOLOGY I FOR SCIENCE MAJORS

Focuses on the unity of life: its biochemical and cellular makeup and functions, the acquisition and utilization of energy, and the storage and utilization of genetic information. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee. CO-REQUISITE(S): Recommended: CHE 130 and CHE 131.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 192

GENERAL BIOLOGY II FOR SCIENCE MAJORS

Introduction to evolution, ecology, organismal development and diversity. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 and BIO 191 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 193

GENERAL BIOLOGY III FOR SCIENCE MAJORS

Deals primarily with diversity and development within the plant and animal kingdoms including basic principles of physiology. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 and BIO 192 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 215

ECOLOGY

Study of organismal interactions; responses of individuals, populations and natural communities to their external environment. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 193 is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 250

CELL BIOLOGY

Fundamentals of cell form and function studied at the molecular and organelle level, including basic cellular biochemistry, ultrastructure and physiology. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 193 and (CHE 134 or CHE 138) are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 260

GENETICS

Transmission of heritable traits, nature of genetic material, manner of its expression, its mutability, and its significance with respect to organismal and species variation. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 191 and BIO 193 are a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 309

PLANT PHYSIOLOGY

A study of the functional and developmental aspects of flowering plants. Lecture-laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 250 or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this class.

BIO 310

VERTEBRATE PHYSIOLOGY

Functions and regulatory mechanisms of vertebrate cells, organs and organ systems with special emphasis on mammals. Lecture-Laboratory. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
BIO 250 or instructor consent is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 130

PRECALCULUS

Functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse functions, polynomial and rational functions.
Prerequisites:
MAT 101 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 491

EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP OF SCHOOLS

This course introduces students to the research base of organizational theory, the politics of education, and foundations of building level instructional leadership. Multiple theories are examined in light of the students? experience in educational settings. This examination of theory in light of experience provides the students with a framework for analyzing both familiar educational institutions and the theories that support educational institutions. Through a study of administrative and organizational theory using those settings with which students are most familiar, students will become more reflective of the theoretical base that will inform their future practice as administrators.
Prerequisites:
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 147

CALCULUS WITH INTEGRATED PRECALCULUS I

Limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, and applications, with precalculus review included for each topic. The full MAT 147-8-9 sequence covers all the material of MAT 150-1-2 plus additional precalculus material.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or equivalents or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 150

CALCULUS I

Limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, extrema, curve sketching, and optimization. This course meets for an additional 1.5-hour lab session each week for enrichment and problem solving.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 160

CALCULUS FOR MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE MAJORS I

Limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, extrema, curve sketching, and optimization. Course meets for an additional 1.5 hour lab session each week in order to cover the material in greater depth. Students considering a math major are advised to take the 160 or 170 sequence.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 170

CALCULUS I WITH SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS

The course covers the following topics using examples from the sciences: Functions as models, logarithmic scale graphing, exponential growth and decay, difference equations and limits of sequences, geometric series, functions and limits, trigonometric functions and their limits, continuity, limits at infinity, the derivative, differentiation rules, derivatives of trigonometric and exponential functions, related rates, derivatives of inverse and logarithm functions. Course meets for an additional lab session each week during which time students will work on applied mathematics projects based on the topics covered in the course. Students majoring in the sciences should consult with their major department to decide between the 160 and 170 sequences.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 131

TRIGONOMETRY

Trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, laws of sines and cosines, polar coordinates and complex plane.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or equivalents or placement by test is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 148

CALCULUS WITH INTEGRATED PRECALCULUS II

Extrema, curve sketching, related rates, definite and indefinite integrals, applications of the integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, with precalculus review included for each topic.
Prerequisites:
MAT 147 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 151

CALCULUS II

Definite and indefinite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, applications of the integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse trigonometric functions, techniques of integration. This course meets for an additional 1.5-hour lab session each week for enrichment and problem solving.
Prerequisites:
MAT 150 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 161

CALCULUS FOR MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE MAJORS II

Definite and indefinite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, applications of the integral, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse trigonometric functions, techniques of integration. Course meets for an additional 1.5 hour lab session each week in order to cover the material in greater depth.
Prerequisites:
MAT 147 or MAT 150 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a prerequisite for this class.

MAT 171

CALCULUS II WITH SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS

The course covers the following topics using examples from the sciences: Applications of the derivative including approximation and local linearity, differentials, extrema and the Mean Value Theorem, monotonicity and concavity, extrema, inflection points, graphing, L'Hospital's Rule, optimization, and the Newton-Raphson method, antiderivaties, the definite integral, Riemann sums, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, area, cumulative change, average value of a function, and techniques of integration: substitution rule and integration by parts. Course meets for an additional lab session each week during which time students will work on applied mathematics projects based on the topics covered in the course. Course meets for an additional lab session each week during which time students will work on applied mathematics projects based on the topics covered in the course.
Prerequisites:
MAT 150 or MAT 160 or MAT 170 is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 130

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I

This introductory course for science majors emphasizes the composition of matter, atomic and molecular structure, bonding and chemical reactions. It is the first in the three-course sequence of General Chemistry. This course meets for three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 131.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or (CHE 128 and CHE 129) is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 131

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY

Laboratory course to be taken in conjunction with CHE 130. The course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE130. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE130. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 or (CHE 128 and CHE 129) is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 132

GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

Second course of three in the General Chemistry series. Topics discussed include: common states of matter, phase transitions, properties of solutions, kinetics and equilibrium. This course meets for three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE133.
Prerequisites:
CHE 130 and CHE 131 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 133

GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 132. The Course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques learned in lab provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE132. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 132. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
CHE 130 and 131 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 134

GENERAL CHEMISTRY III

Third of three courses in the General Chemistry sequence. Topics included in lecture: chemical equilibrium in aqueous solution (acids and bases, solubility, complex ion formation), Thermodynamics (entropy and free energy), electrochemistry, chemistry of d-block elements and descriptive chemistry. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE135.
Prerequisites:
CHE 132 and CHE 133 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 135

GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY III

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE 134. The Course meets weekly for three hours. The experimental techniques provide hands-on experience with the course material in CHE134. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 134. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
CHE 132 and CHE 133 are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 230

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I

First in a sequence of courses designed to investigate what organic chemistry is and how it works, by emphasizing the relationship between structure and function of organic molecule and the language and fundamental concepts of organic chemistry, including: structure and bonding; acid-base reactions; functional groups; thermodynamics and kinetics of organic reactions; stereochemistry; substitution and elimination reactions of alkyl halides. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE231.
Prerequisites:
(CHE 134 and CHE 135) or (CHE 138 and CHE 139) are prerequisites for this class.

CHE 231

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY I

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE230. CO-REQUISTE(S): CHE 230. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
(CHE 134 and CHE 135) or (CHE 138 and CHE 139) are a prerequisite and CHE 230 is a corequisite for this class.

PHY 150

GENERAL PHYSICS I

This course provides a comprehensive, non-calculus introduction to physics. Vectors, forces, Newtonia mechanics of translational and rotational motion. This course is intended for life science and health science majors. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
MAT 131 or above is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 232

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

Second in a sequence of courses designed to investigate what organic chemistry is and how it works, by emphasizing the relationship between structure and function of organic molecules. Specific topics investigated include the reactivity and synthesis of alcohols, ethers, epoxides, alkenes, alkynes, alkanes, conjugated, and aromatic compounds. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE233
Prerequisites:
(CHE 230 and CHE 231) or (CHE 236/ and CHE 237) are a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 233

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY II

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE232. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE 232. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
(CHE 230 and CHE 231) or (CHE 236/ and CHE 237) are a prerequisite for this class.

PHY 151

GENERAL PHYSICS II

Continuation of PHY 150. Topics include heat, thermodynamics, sound and light. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
PHY 150 is a prerequisite for this class.

CHE 234

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY III

Third in a sequence of courses designed to investigate what organic chemistry is and how it works, by emphasizing the relationship between structure and function of organic molecules. Specific topics investigated include the reactivity and synthesis of carbonyl compounds; amines; and bio-molecules. CO-REQUISITE(S): CHE235.
Prerequisites:
CHE 232 and CHE 233 are a prerequisite and CHE 235 is a corequisite for this class.

CHE 235

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY III

Laboratory to be taken in conjunction with CHE234. CO-REQUISITE(S):CHE 234. Lab fee.
Prerequisites:
CHE 232 and CHE 233 are a prerequisite and CHE 234 is a corequisite for this class.

PHY 152

GENERAL PHYSICS III

Continuation of PHY 151. Topics include electricity, magnetism and modern physics. Laboratory fee.
Prerequisites:
PHY 151 is a prerequisite for this class.

EDU 25

BASIC TECHNOLOGY LITERACY

(0 Credit) This online course provides students with a knowledge about assembling, using, and troubleshooting basic technology hardware and software. In this course, students demonstrate understanding of basic computer setup and the use of peripheral devices such as printers, speakers, flash drives, scanners, digital cameras, videos, and computer software.

SCU 207

SOCIAL AND HISTORICAL ISSUES IN EDUCATION

This course examines through an interdisciplinary framework sociological and historical issues and concerns associated with the relationship between education and public life. The course analyzes education as a form of cultural power, addressing its political and ideological effects. Emphasis will be placed upon the social and historical meanings and purposes assigned to education, especially as it pertains to questions of race, gender, sexuality, and the political economy of class.

SEC 363

ORIENTATION TO SECONDARY TEACHING AS A PROFESSION

(6 credits) In this process-oriented course, students engage in critical reflection on the roles and expectations of secondary educators from both institutional and community perspectives. Questions considered will include: what is an educator, what is a professional, what are the attributes of effective teachers, what do effective teachers do? Students will examine their own values and begin to develop their own philosophies about education and teaching. 30 Level 1 Field Experience hours at arranged sites.

SEC 364

METHODS: CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS

(4 credits) This course will examine materials, methods, and techniques appropriate for teaching in secondary schools. Topics include: educational goals; the development of a rationale and underlying assumptions; instructional goals and objectives; learning objectives; both cognitive and affective; classroom environment; classroom management principles and techniques; multicultural materials in various content areas; the development of appropriate methods and materials; current curriculum issues and controversies. 30 Level 1 Field Experience hours at arranged sites.
Prerequisites:
SEC 363 or status as a major in World Language Education is a prerequisite for this class.

SCU 336

ADOLESCENT AND ADULT GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Theories of development throughout adolescence including current issues of problems and growth crises in attaining maturation. The course also includes adult and aging life span considerations. Emphasis is placed on the role of the early childhood professional in interaction with adults in the lives of young children (i.e., parents, grandparents).

SCU 337

HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

This course is an introduction to the study of the process of human development from conception to old age. Through a range of theories, the periods of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood are examined with particular attention to the role of culture, gender, and class as they inform the contextualized process of growth and change across the life span.

LSI 346

STRATEGIES FOR MAINSTREAMING AND INCLUSION

Focus will be on the practical problems related to the integration of exceptional children and youth into regular classrooms. Identification, characteristics, programs, curricular variations, and techniques for securing maximum development of students with a variety of special needs with emphasis on learning disabilities. The course also covers historical background, as well as current legal and service provision issues, including mainstreaming and inclusion. PREREQUISITE(S): Junior standing.
Prerequisites:
Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing is a prerequisite for this class.

SEC 325

LITERACY IN THE CONTENT AREAS

The course explores the interrelationships between reading, writing, and other forms of communication (e.g., classroom talk, technology, visual arts) that are available to content area middle-level and high-school teachers. There will be an emphasis on the interrelationship of all aspects of language, oral and written, that result in literacy as a meaning-making tool in the construction of content-area knowledge. The course will discuss specific aspects of literacy processes from a multicultural, multilingual perspective as they apply to a variety of school settings in general and urban schools in particular. Students will become acquainted with theoretical issues as well as a wide range of literacy-teaching strategies including reading, writing, research, and study skills to be tailored to the needs of different students and to be applied across a variety of learning situations and text types. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours.
Prerequisites:
SEC 363, SEC 364 and Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 339

TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL

This course prepares teacher-candidates for teaching science in the middle school and high school. This involves reviewing the processes of science, theories of learning, and instructional strategies appropriate to laboratory science. This course also provides an update on the current trends and issues in science education as well as an analysis of successful science curricula programs. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours.
Prerequisites:
SEC 363, SEC 364 and Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing are prerequisites for this class.

SCU 338

THE PROCESS AND EVALUATION OF LEARNING

The process involved in human learning is examined from alternative theoretical and research paradigms and perspectives. The roles of emotions, cultural differences, social realities, cognitive uniqueness, character and achievement tendencies are examined with respect to learner functioning. Alternative methods and techniques for evaluating learner development and academic achievement are surveyed and discussed. Emphasis is placed upon identifying the characteristics of individually and culturally responsive and responsible testing and assessment protocols in the school setting.
Prerequisites:
Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing is a prerequisite for this class.

SCU 339

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY OF YOUTH AND MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION

This course introduces foundational and contemporary theories of youth and adolescent development. It provides an investigation of how these theoretical ideas relate to contemporary questions of youth and middle level education. The course explores the historical invention of adolescence, changing ideas about the meaning of childhood, as well as some of the broader social, economic, political, and cultural implications of these changing ideas. This course seeks to develop in prospective educators a broader capacity to theorize about youth and schooling and, hence, to act critically and reflectively in multiple contexts in which youth learn.
Prerequisites:
Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing is a prerequisite for this class.

SEC 384

CAPSTONE IN SECONDARY EDUCATION

The senior capstone course is designed to help students integrate the central emphases of their liberal learning studies curriculum into their professional behavior. It will provide prospective elementary educators with opportunities to engage in activities requiring them to reflect, to consider value commitments, to use critical and creative thinking, and to examine their practice from a multicultural perspective as they discuss issues specific early childhood education. The course is grounded in the College of Education's framework for an Urban Professional Multicultural Educator, which also reflects the goals of the Liberal Studies program. COREQUISITE(S): SEC 390.

SCG 439

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY OF YOUTH AND MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION

This course examines foundational and contemporary theories of youth and adolescent development. It considers how these theoretical ideas relate to contemporary questions of youth and middle level education. The course explores the historical invention of adolescence, changing ideas about the meaning of childhood, as well as some of the broader social, economic, political, and cultural implications of these changing ideas. This course seeks to develop in prospective educators a broader capacity to theorize about youth and schooling, and, hence, to act critically and reflectively in multiple contexts in which youth learn.

EDU 95

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH CHILDREN AND YOUTH

(no credit) Required of all students. Observations and participatory experience with children and youth in a school or agency. This course is a prerequisite for student teaching and related professional courses.

SEC 390

SECONDARY STUDENT TEACHING

(12 credits) Five school days a week in supervised teaching in a cooperating school for a full academic quarter. Feedback and discussion of problems encountered in student teaching as well as new materials and techniques of student teaching. PREREQUISITE(S): Application and approval required. Open only to DePaul students.

SEC 314

THE NATURE OF SCIENCE

This course is about the nature of science and the interactions between science and society. It will build on the foundation of understandings that students already have about the processes and conventions of science developed through their years as science students to create opportunities for deeper understandings of the beliefs and assumptions inherent to the creation of scientific knowledge. These opportunities will be developed through direct interactions with professional scientists as well as through case studies and readings that illustrate the strengths, limits and pitfalls of the scientific endeavor as well as provide opportunities for students to relate science to their daily lives and interests and to a larger framework of human endeavor and understanding (e.g., relationships among systems of human endeavor including science and technology; relationships among scientific, technological, personal, social and cultural values). Cases will be drawn from different scientific disciplines as well as from modern and historic times. In this way, science students will have a better understanding of what it means to be a scientist and how science interfaces with society. The course is a prerequisite for SEC 324.

SEC 324

INQUIRY & APPLICATION IN DEVELOPING SECONDARY SCIENCE PEDAGOGY

Following SEC 314, this course transitions from asking "what does a scientist do?" to a consideration of why science literacy in the general public has been so difficult to achieve. The focusing questions for SEC 324 are: "How do we teach science? What is science literacy? Why is an understanding of science important to the general public? and What are the major obstacles and strategies to achieving science literacy?" The course begins by participants self-reflecting on their own educational experiences that led to their paths in science education: what have been their successful learning strategies, how have teachers influenced their education and what have been successful (and less than successful) classroom instructional strategies? From this, students will begin science classroom observation, discussing their observations with their peers, and speaking with educators about their experiences teaching high school science and about the goals and short-comings of science education. Throughout this process, students will read seminal literature on science literacy and explore cases challenging their notions of the teacher-learner relationship and the relationship between science and society. As a result of this course, students will gain a deeper understanding of scientific literacy and the barriers to understanding and teaching science as well as identify what makes an exceptional science teacher able to prepare both future scientists and a knowledgeable public. 25 Level 1 Field Experience hours.
Prerequisites:
SEC 314 is a prerequisite for this course.

SEC 374

TEACHING THE SCIENCES IN THE HIGH SCHOOL 1

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical issues of teaching the sciences in secondary classrooms. The course introduces candidates to research-based and theoretically grounded best practices in the teaching of the different sciences, including biology, chemistry, environmental science, and physics. Students will practice and reflect on writing instructional objectives, developing lesson plans, designing a curriculum unit, creating a classroom environment, and implementing instructional delivery strategies and methods, including the use of technology resources, that meet the needs of diverse learners, including English language learners and students who speak nonmainstream dialects of English. Students will reflect on their own emerging educational philosophies and theories. They will also demonstrate commitment to teaching as a professional who acts responsibly, ethically, and collegially in accordance to Vincentian personalism. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours required. COREQUISITE(S): Taken in conjunction with SCU 351.
Prerequisites:
SEC 364 and Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 385

TEACHING THE SCIENCES IN THE HIGH SCHOOL 2

This course continues students' immersion into the pedagogical content knowledge development and practices that began in SEC 324 and SEC 374. The course provides students opportunities to continue to explore and develop research-based and theoretically grounded best practices in the teaching of the different sciences, including biology, chemistry, environmental science, and physics with an emphasis on reflective and collaborative practice. The course provides extensive opportunities for planning, using, and evaluating a variety of instructional strategies, including the use of technology resources, through teaching demonstrations and modeling and field experiences. Students will fine-tune and reflect on writing instructional objectives, developing lesson plans, designing a curriculum unit, creating a classroom environment, and implementing instructional delivery strategies and methods that meet the needs of diverse learners, including English language learners and students who speak nonmainstream dialects of English. And like in SEC 374, students will reflect on and clearly articulate orally, in writing, and through practice an educational philosophy and theory. Students will also demonstrate commitment to teaching as a professional who acts responsibly, ethically, and collegially in accordance to Vincentian personalism. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours required. COREQUISITE(S): Taken in conjunction with SCU 351.
Prerequisites:
SEC 374 is a prerequisite for this course.

SCU 351

DOING CRITICAL PRACTITIONER RESEARCH IN EDUCATION

This course introduces students to different approaches to education research and research methods with a focus on critical practitioner research. Students will become discerning readers of educational research and be able to design and conduct research related to teaching and learning in a variety of disciplinary areas (English, history/social sciences, mathematics, or science) at the secondary level. They will develop skills to critically examine and reflect on practice in the classroom through discipline-specific research projects. Taken concurrently with SEC 371, SEC 372, SEC 373, SEC 374 and SEC 381, SEC 382, SEC 383, SEC 385. (Course spans two quarters: Fall-Winter or Winter-Spring).

SEC 395

ASSESSMENT ISSUES IN SECONDARY EDUCATION

This course introduces candidates to theoretical and philosophical issues related to educational assessment. It addresses the range of assessments teachers will encounter in school settings, including individual cognitive and social and emotional assessments; course material, curricula, and disciplinary program assessments; and large scale high-stakes testing. The course provides candidates opportunities to explore student, program, and curricular assessment issues, including assessment methods and tools; standardized, quantitative, and qualitative assessments; formal and informal assessments; formative and summative assessments; integrated, self-, and peer assessments; cultural, social, economic, and language influences on assessments; and issues of reliability and validity in assessment.
Prerequisites:
SEC 364 and Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing are prerequisites for this class.

BBE 301

TEACHING ADOLESCENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS AND DIALECT SPEAKERS ACROSS THE CURRICULUM

This course provides educators across disciplinary content areas foundational knowledge for teaching and assessing adolescent English language learners (ELLs) and speakers of non-dominant varieties of English. Especial focus is placed on identifying and augmenting students' various (oral and written) proficiencies and inter- and intra-linguistic varieties of English toward increased academic English proficiency. This course also engages educators in realizing in curriculum and instruction the multifaceted aspects of fostering academic proficiency among adolescent ELLs and speakers of non-dominant varieties of English, such as theories of first, second, and heritage language sociolinguistics; language policy and planning; cross-disciplinary collaboration; parental/family language practices; family and community participation and involvement; informed decision making and advocacy; school/community discourses; learner accommodations; WIDA and Common Core standards; and culturally and linguistically appropriate assessment.

SEC 387

CAPSTONE SEMINAR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION

This course is designed to help candidates integrate the central emphases of their Liberal Studies curriculum with their professional knowledge and behavior. It provides opportunities and activities to prospective educators that engage them in being analytic and reflective upon their major and related disciplines; guide them in further considering their value commitments and how they relate to their chosen profession; apply critical and creative thinking in addressing 'real-time' professional issues and needs; and examine extant practices from multicultural perspectives. Candidates develop a professional teaching portfolio that reflects the standards of the various guiding professional organizations and the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE). The course is grounded in the College of Education's framework for an Urban Professional Multicultural Educator as well as the goals of the Liberal Studies program. The course is taken simultaneously with student teaching. COREQUISITE(S): SEC 390.