Course Requirements

Content Area Courses

History Core: 16 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Historical Methods: 8 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required  

Advanced History Course: 16 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

  • HST US History elective 1
  • HST US History elective 2
  • HST Non-US History
  • HST World History elective

History Elective Course: 16 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

  • HST Elective 1
  • HST Elective 2
  • HST Elective 3
  • HST Elective 4

Note: A minimum of 6 HST courses must be at the 300 level.

Pre-Education Introductory Courses: 20 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Advanced Standing Education Courses: 28 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Student Teaching: 10 quarter hours required, grade of B- or better required

Registration in student teaching requires completion of all requirements and procedures listed in the college core requirements.  EDU 095 indicates to the Illinois State Board of Education that all field experience hours are complete.  All students also take SEC 387, Capstone Seminar with student teaching (listed in the Liberal Studies section).

Licensure Tests

All individuals licensed by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) are required to complete licensure tests specific to their teaching license.  Secondary Education History majors must complete the following tests: 
 
  • Test of Academic Proficiency (TAP) (test #400) - assesses knowledge of reading comprehension, language arts, writing, and math.  Test is required to qualify for Advanced Standing.  *Check with your advisor about qualifying for a waiver with acceptable ACT or SAT test scores.
  • Social Science: History Content Area Test (test #114) – assesses and measures the candidate's core knowledge across history and social science fields.  Test is required before Student Teaching (deadlines apply).
  • Assessment of Professional Teaching (APT) (test #103, grade 6-12) – assesses knowledge of teaching planning, delivery, assessment, professionalism, and technology.  Test is required to be licensed; recommended to be taken before Student Teaching. ​

HST 181

UNITED STATES TO 1800

A survey of the major social, political, economic and cultural themes in U.S. History from the earliest European settlements to the aftermath of the Revolution. Formerly HST 280.

HST 182

UNITED STATES, 1800-1900

A survey of the major social, political, economic and cultural themes in U.S. history from the aftermath of the Revolution to the Spanish-American War. Formerly HST 281.

HST 111

THE WORLD TO C.1500

This course will examine the phenomenon of civilization as experienced by West Asian, South Asian, East Asian, African, European, and Pre-Columbian American societies to 1500 A.D. Formerly HST 218.

HST 112

THE WORLD, C.1500-1914

This course will examine the global integration of all societies from 1500 A.D. to World War I. Formerly HST 219.

HST 298

INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL SOURCES AND METHODS

This is the first of two introductory core courses required of all history majors, history minors, and education majors with a concentration in history. In this course, students will learn the varied ways in which scholars interpret the past, focusing particularly on the evidence and arguments used by historians in their work. To that end, students will learn about the varieties of primary sources (textual, material, oral) as well as the varied methods historians use to analyze such evidence. In addition, students will practice analyzing primary source evidence in oral and written presentations, learn how to use the library for historical research, and how to discern scholarly arguments in secondary sources.
Prerequisites:
(WRD 103 and WRD 104) or HON 100 is a prerequisite for this class.

HST 299

CRAFT OF HISTORY

This course is the second of two introductory core courses required of all history majors, history minors, and education majors with a concentration in history. In this class, students will bring to bear the skills in historical sources and methods learned in HST 298 to complete a substantial independent research project. To that end, students will learn how to identify a historical question or problem about which to conduct research; how to find, obtain, and evaluate primary source evidence to research; how to build a secondary source bibliography using reference works, monographs, and scholarly journal articles; and develop and execute a coherent plan for writing and revising a substantial research paper (of at least 10 pages in length) based on an integrated use of both primary and secondary sources.
Prerequisites:
HST 298 a prerequisite for this class.

WRD 98

PREPARATION FOR COLLEGE READING

For students who need extra preparation in the development of college reading skills. Emphasizes development of reading strategies suitable for understanding a range of texts.

WRD 101

BASIC WRITING I

An introduction to academic writing; extensive practice in gathering and organizing ideas; attention to correctness in mechanics, grammar, and usage. Students placed in 101 are required to enroll subsequently in 102.

MAT 94

BASIC ALGEBRA

The objective of this course is to increase the students' competence in working with ordinary arithmetic, using a large variety of practical problems and situations from basic sciences as motivation. Formerly WRC 104.

MAT 95

INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA

An introduction to functions, linear equations, linear inequalities, absolute values, systems of linear equations, exponents, and polynomials. Formerly WRC 204.
Prerequisites:
MAT 094or placement is a prerequisite for this course.

EDU 25

BASIC TECHNOLOGY LITERACY

(0 Credit) This online course provides students with a knowledge about assembling, using, and troubleshooting basic technology hardware and software. In this course, students demonstrate understanding of basic computer setup and the use of peripheral devices such as printers, speakers, flash drives, scanners, digital cameras, videos, and computer software.

SCU 207

SOCIAL AND HISTORICAL ISSUES IN EDUCATION

This course examines through an interdisciplinary framework sociological and historical issues and concerns associated with the relationship between education and public life. The course analyzes education as a form of cultural power, addressing its political and ideological effects. Emphasis will be placed upon the social and historical meanings and purposes assigned to education, especially as it pertains to questions of race, gender, sexuality, and the political economy of class.

SEC 363

ORIENTATION TO SECONDARY TEACHING AS A PROFESSION

(6 credits) In this process-oriented course, students engage in critical reflection on the roles and expectations of secondary educators from both institutional and community perspectives. Questions considered will include: what is an educator, what is a professional, what are the attributes of effective teachers, what do effective teachers do? Students will examine their own values and begin to develop their own philosophies about education and teaching. 30 Level 1 Field Experience hours at arranged sites.

SEC 364

METHODS: CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS

(4 credits) This course will examine materials, methods, and techniques appropriate for teaching in secondary schools. Topics include: educational goals; the development of a rationale and underlying assumptions; instructional goals and objectives; learning objectives; both cognitive and affective; classroom environment; classroom management principles and techniques; multicultural materials in various content areas; the development of appropriate methods and materials; current curriculum issues and controversies. 30 Level 1 Field Experience hours at arranged sites.
Prerequisites:
SEC 363 or status as a major in World Language Education is a prerequisite for this class.

SCU 336

ADOLESCENT AND ADULT GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Theories of development throughout adolescence including current issues of problems and growth crises in attaining maturation. The course also includes adult and aging life span considerations. Emphasis is placed on the role of the early childhood professional in interaction with adults in the lives of young children (i.e., parents, grandparents).

SCU 337

HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

This course is an introduction to the study of the process of human development from conception to old age. Through a range of theories, the periods of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood are examined with particular attention to the role of culture, gender, and class as they inform the contextualized process of growth and change across the life span.

PE 206

PERSONAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH

This course is designed to assist students in gaining insight into their health/wellness attitudes, behaviors, and choices. Health/wellness experiences and topics examine the total wellness concept, as a self-designed, dynamic style of living which focuses on optimal functioning and quality of life. Emphasis is placed on the physical, emotional, intellectual, social, occupational and spiritual dimensions of health/wellness.

PE 273

HEALTH AND NUTRITION

This course will provide students with an introductory background in nutrition throughout the life span. The study of foods and their effects upon health, development and performance of the individual will be emphasized. Software analysis of dietary intakes will facilitate an individual reflective approach to an application of the content.

LSI 346

STRATEGIES FOR MAINSTREAMING AND INCLUSION

Focus will be on the practical problems related to the integration of exceptional children and youth into regular classrooms. Identification, characteristics, programs, curricular variations, and techniques for securing maximum development of students with a variety of special needs with emphasis on learning disabilities. The course also covers historical background, as well as current legal and service provision issues, including mainstreaming and inclusion. PREREQUISITE(S): Junior standing.
Prerequisites:
Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing is a prerequisite for this class.

SEC 325

LITERACY IN THE CONTENT AREAS

The course explores the interrelationships between reading, writing, and other forms of communication (e.g., classroom talk, technology, visual arts) that are available to content area middle-level and high-school teachers. There will be an emphasis on the interrelationship of all aspects of language, oral and written, that result in literacy as a meaning-making tool in the construction of content-area knowledge. The course will discuss specific aspects of literacy processes from a multicultural, multilingual perspective as they apply to a variety of school settings in general and urban schools in particular. Students will become acquainted with theoretical issues as well as a wide range of literacy-teaching strategies including reading, writing, research, and study skills to be tailored to the needs of different students and to be applied across a variety of learning situations and text types. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours.
Prerequisites:
SEC 363, SEC 364 and Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 310

TEACHING, HISTORY, AND SOCIAL SCIENCES IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS

Prepares teacher-candidates for teaching history and social sciences at the middle and secondary school levels. Examines the nature and purpose of history and social sciences curriculum within secondary schools, the current status of social studies materials and practices, and issues confronting today's secondary social studies teachers. Emphasis on alternative teaching strategies, resources for teaching and learning, teachers' responsibilities in curriculum development and decision making, and methods and materials for addressing cultural diversity. Lesson and unit development, evaluation, and classroom management also will be discussed. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours.
Prerequisites:
SEC 363, SEC 364 and Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing are prerequisites for this class.

SCU 338

THE PROCESS AND EVALUATION OF LEARNING

The process involved in human learning is examined from alternative theoretical and research paradigms and perspectives. The roles of emotions, cultural differences, social realities, cognitive uniqueness, character and achievement tendencies are examined with respect to learner functioning. Alternative methods and techniques for evaluating learner development and academic achievement are surveyed and discussed. Emphasis is placed upon identifying the characteristics of individually and culturally responsive and responsible testing and assessment protocols in the school setting.
Prerequisites:
Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing is a prerequisite for this class.

SCU 339

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY OF YOUTH AND MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION

This course introduces foundational and contemporary theories of youth and adolescent development. It provides an investigation of how these theoretical ideas relate to contemporary questions of youth and middle level education. The course explores the historical invention of adolescence, changing ideas about the meaning of childhood, as well as some of the broader social, economic, political, and cultural implications of these changing ideas. This course seeks to develop in prospective educators a broader capacity to theorize about youth and schooling and, hence, to act critically and reflectively in multiple contexts in which youth learn.
Prerequisites:
Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing is a prerequisite for this class.

SEC 390

SECONDARY STUDENT TEACHING

(12 credits) Five school days a week in supervised teaching in a cooperating school for a full academic quarter. Feedback and discussion of problems encountered in student teaching as well as new materials and techniques of student teaching. PREREQUISITE(S): Application and approval required. Open only to DePaul students.

EDU 95

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH CHILDREN AND YOUTH

(no credit) Required of all students. Observations and participatory experience with children and youth in a school or agency. This course is a prerequisite for student teaching and related professional courses.

SEC 384

CAPSTONE IN SECONDARY EDUCATION

The senior capstone course is designed to help students integrate the central emphases of their liberal learning studies curriculum into their professional behavior. It will provide prospective elementary educators with opportunities to engage in activities requiring them to reflect, to consider value commitments, to use critical and creative thinking, and to examine their practice from a multicultural perspective as they discuss issues specific early childhood education. The course is grounded in the College of Education's framework for an Urban Professional Multicultural Educator, which also reflects the goals of the Liberal Studies program. COREQUISITE(S): SEC 390.

SEC 312

THE NATURE OF HISTORY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES

This course builds on the content course work students have done in the seven disciplines grouped under the heading "social sciences" (history, political science, geography, sociology, anthropology, economics, and psychology). In this class students will get further exposure to the basic concepts of the social science disciplines and consider the connections as well as differences between them. The course emphasizes how different disciplinary backgrounds lead students to bring different perspectives to their study of social phenomena and helps them see these phenomena from multiple vantage points. The course will employ a case study approach framed around social issues of interest to all seven disciplines (e.g. social control, threats, development, natural disasters). By the end of the course, students will have applied the knowledge and skills of multiple social science disciplines to evaluate social phenomena, considered the relationship and differences between those disciplines, and be prepared to enter SEC 322 where they will apply their content knowledge to inquiry and teaching in the field.

SEC 322

INQUIRY & APPLICATION IN DEVELOPING SECONDARY HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCES PEDAGOGY

This course builds on the content knowledge students developed and reinforced in SEC 312. More, it asks them to make the shift from considering how a person prepared in the social sciences analyzes social phenomena to how such a person teaches the social sciences. Students will do this by developing two units of inquiry-based case studies that they could use in their own classrooms. The topics of these case studies will vary from section to section, depending on the needs of the students and expertise of the instructor. Possible topics include the Constitution, the Cold War, slavery, and the Iraq War. As students work on these projects, they will continue to reflect on the course work they have done in the content areas as well as the instruction they see teachers delivering in their field experiences. They will contemplate such questions as: "What are the connections between the social science disciplines? How can they be taught together, creating interdisciplinary courses at the high school level? What are the differences between the social science disciplines and what does this mean for secondary pedagogy? How can teachers use inquiry with their students, making sure they have enough guidance to learn about social events but also the freedom to pursue their interests and make sense of the world on their own terms?" By the end of this course, students through readings and their projects will have advanced their learning about the nature of inquiry, its implementation in the classroom, and the connections and differences between the social science disciplines. 25 Level 1 Field Experience hours.
Prerequisites:
SEC 312 is a prerequisite for this course.

SEC 372

TEACHING HISTORY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES IN THE HIGH SCHOOL 1

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical issues of teaching history and the social sciences in secondary classrooms. The course introduces candidates to research-based and theoretically grounded best practices in the teaching of the basic concepts of the seven social science disciplines. Students will practice and reflect on writing instructional objectives, developing lesson plans, designing a curriculum unit, creating a classroom environment, and implementing instructional delivery strategies and methods, including the use of technology resources, that meet the needs of diverse learners, including English language learners and students who speak nonmainstream dialects of English. Students will reflect on their own emerging educational philosophies and theories. They will also demonstrate commitment to teaching as a professional who acts responsibly, ethically, and collegially in accordance to Vincentian personalism. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours required. COREQUISITE(S): Taken in conjunction with SCU 351.
Prerequisites:
SEC 364 and Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing are prerequisites for this class.

SEC 382

TEACHING HISTORY AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES IN THE HIGH SCHOOL 2

This course continues students' immersion into the pedagogical content knowledge development and practices that began in SEC 322 and SEC 372. The course provides students opportunities to continue to explore and develop research-based and theoretically grounded best practices in the teaching of the basic concepts of the seven social science disciplines with an emphasis on reflective and collaborative practice. The course provides extensive opportunities for planning, using, and evaluating a variety of instructional strategies, including the use of technology resources, through teaching demonstrations and modeling and field experiences. Students will fine-tune and reflect on writing instructional objectives, developing lesson plans, designing a curriculum unit, creating a classroom environment, and implementing instructional delivery strategies and methods that meet the needs of diverse learners, including English language learners and students who speak nonmainstream dialects of English. And like in SEC 372, students will reflect on and clearly articulate orally, in writing, and through practice an educational philosophy and theory. Students will also demonstrate commitment to teaching as a professional who acts responsibly, ethically, and collegially in accordance to Vincentian personalism. 30 Level 2 Field Experience hours required. COREQUISITE(S): Taken in conjunction with SCU 351.
Prerequisites:
SEC 372 is a prerequisite for this course.

SCU 351

DOING CRITICAL PRACTITIONER RESEARCH IN EDUCATION

This course introduces students to different approaches to education research and research methods with a focus on critical practitioner research. Students will become discerning readers of educational research and be able to design and conduct research related to teaching and learning in a variety of disciplinary areas (English, history/social sciences, mathematics, or science) at the secondary level. They will develop skills to critically examine and reflect on practice in the classroom through discipline-specific research projects. Taken concurrently with SEC 371, SEC 372, SEC 373, SEC 374 and SEC 381, SEC 382, SEC 383, SEC 385. (Course spans two quarters: Fall-Winter or Winter-Spring).

SEC 395

ASSESSMENT ISSUES IN SECONDARY EDUCATION

This course introduces candidates to theoretical and philosophical issues related to educational assessment. It addresses the range of assessments teachers will encounter in school settings, including individual cognitive and social and emotional assessments; course material, curricula, and disciplinary program assessments; and large scale high-stakes testing. The course provides candidates opportunities to explore student, program, and curricular assessment issues, including assessment methods and tools; standardized, quantitative, and qualitative assessments; formal and informal assessments; formative and summative assessments; integrated, self-, and peer assessments; cultural, social, economic, and language influences on assessments; and issues of reliability and validity in assessment.
Prerequisites:
SEC 364 and Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing are prerequisites for this class.

BBE 301

TEACHING ADOLESCENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS AND DIALECT SPEAKERS ACROSS THE CURRICULUM

This course provides educators across disciplinary content areas foundational knowledge for teaching and assessing adolescent English language learners (ELLs) and speakers of non-dominant varieties of English. Especial focus is placed on identifying and augmenting students' various (oral and written) proficiencies and inter- and intra-linguistic varieties of English toward increased academic English proficiency. This course also engages educators in realizing in curriculum and instruction the multifaceted aspects of fostering academic proficiency among adolescent ELLs and speakers of non-dominant varieties of English, such as theories of first, second, and heritage language sociolinguistics; language policy and planning; cross-disciplinary collaboration; parental/family language practices; family and community participation and involvement; informed decision making and advocacy; school/community discourses; learner accommodations; WIDA and Common Core standards; and culturally and linguistically appropriate assessment.

SEC 387

CAPSTONE SEMINAR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION

This course is designed to help candidates integrate the central emphases of their Liberal Studies curriculum with their professional knowledge and behavior. It provides opportunities and activities to prospective educators that engage them in being analytic and reflective upon their major and related disciplines; guide them in further considering their value commitments and how they relate to their chosen profession; apply critical and creative thinking in addressing 'real-time' professional issues and needs; and examine extant practices from multicultural perspectives. Candidates develop a professional teaching portfolio that reflects the standards of the various guiding professional organizations and the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE). The course is grounded in the College of Education's framework for an Urban Professional Multicultural Educator as well as the goals of the Liberal Studies program. The course is taken simultaneously with student teaching. COREQUISITE(S): SEC 390.