Catalog Version

Summer/Autumn 2013
Catalog update:
May 15, 2013

Access archived catalogs in the Catalog Archive section.​​​​​

Students are required to follow the Academic Handbook and Code of Student Responsibility

Course Requirements

Content Area Courses

Note: Language courses begin at the Advanced language for the major.  A placement test in the language is required to determine skill level and appropriate level to begin the language.  Beginning and Intermediate language courses are in addition to the content area requirements but can fulfill open elective requirements.

Advanced Language Core: 24 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Chinese Studies: 24 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Teaching Culture Core: 4 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Pre-Education Introductory Courses: 22 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Advanced Standing Education Courses: 24 quarter hours required, grade of C or better required

Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) Test

Pursuing certification in the teaching of a world language (Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, or Spanish) requires the oral proficiency test – an Interview – before you begin student teaching. You must earn a rating of "intermediate high" or better on the test.
 

Open Electives: 2 quarter hours are required

Open elective credit also is required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours.  The following cannot be used to fulfill an open elective: WRD 98, WRD 101, MAT 94, and MAT 95.
 

​Student Teaching: 12 quarter hours required, grade of B- or better required

Registration in student teaching requires completion of all requirements and procedures indicated in the college core section.  EDU 95 indicates to the Illinois State Board of Education that all field experience hours are complete.  All students also take WLE 384 with student teaching (listed in the Liberal Studies section). 

Licensure Tests 

All individuals licensed by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) are required to complete licensure tests specific to their teaching license.  World Language Education Chinese majors must complete the following tests: 

  • Test of Academic Proficiency (TAP) (test #400) - assesses knowledge of reading comprehension, language arts, writing, and math.  Test is required to qualify for Advanced Standing.  *Check with your advisor about qualifying for a waiver with acceptable ACT or SAT test scores.
  • Chinese Content Area Test (test #126) – assesses knowledge of the Chinese language and culture.  Test is required before Student Teaching (deadlines apply).
  • Assessment of Professional Teaching (APT) (test #104, grade K-12) – assesses knowledge of teaching planning, delivery, assessment, professionalism, and technology.  Test is required to be licensed; recommended to be taken before Student Teaching. 

CHN 201

ADVANCED CHINESE I

Further work on grammatical principles as well as intensive reading and writing practice.

CHN 202

ADVANCED CHINESE II

Continued emphasis on grammatical principles and further refinement of all four language skills.

CHN 203

ADVANCED CHINESE III

Special emphasis on conversation within the context of all four skills.

HAA 115

ASIAN ART

An introduction to major developments of art and architecture across Asia including South Asia, Southeast Asia, the Himalayas, and East Asia. This course examines not only painting, sculpture, and architecture, but also gardens, ceramics, and prints. Special emphasis will be placed on religious arts of Buddhism and Hinduism, along with landscape and figural painting of China and Japan. Formerly ART 242.

HAA 220

BUDDHIST ART

This course explores the traditional visual culture of the Buddhist world, examining art as a reflection of religious belief and practice. The regions covered are South Asia, Southeast Asia, and East Asia. An emphasis is placed on painting, sculpture, and architecture made for or related to Buddhist practice. Formerly ART 250. Crosslisted with AAS 290

HAA 215

CHINESE ART

This is a chronological survey of premodern Chinese art from antiquity to the nineteenth century. Special attention is given to sculpture and painting, but architecture and ceramics are also covered. There is an emphasis on prehistoric bronze vessels, Buddhist sculpture, and landscape painting of the Song through Qing periods. Formerly ART 342.

GEO 215

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND REGIONAL INEQUALITY

This course charts the political, social and economic transformation of the developing countries, (Africa, Asia, Latin America, Caribbean, Pacific Islands) into a global economy dominated by the 'developed' countries (North America, Europe and Japan). This process, termed `GLOBALIZATION', results from the operation of the global market mechanism; the activities of Transnational Corporations (TNCs) and the programs of the International Financial Institutions (IFIs).

HST 232

CULTURE AND POLITICS IN IMPERIAL CHINA

Examines the history of Chinese civilization from the early Shang kingship through the development of the Chinese Empire (221 B.C. - A.D. 1911). We will focus on systematic changes in political, economic, and social structures in China and the intellectual and cultural forms that each configuration produced. Topics include the growth of the Chinese empire, Chinese forms of Buddhism, and the development of Chinese philosophy, scholarship and literature.

HST 233

THE RISE OF MODERN CHINA

Examines the history of Chinese civilization from the 18th century to the present. We will survey the height of the authority of the Qing Imperial government, its dissolution in the 19th century, and the creation of a revolutionary China in the 20th century. Topics include the Opium War and China's foreign relations, the introduction of Westernized technology and education, and the rise of Communism under the leadership of Mao Zedong. Also considers the ways in which our contemporary understanding of China is formed by recent developments in the media - Chinese news and film.

HST 161

EAST ASIA TO C. 1200

Outlines the history of the region (China, Korea and Japan) during the period of antiquity. Follows the development and the formation of dynastic rule in China and Korea and the imperial institution in Japan. Assesses the extent of the role of ancient Chinese philosophy, language, and statecraft in establishing a coherent region we now call "East Asia."

HST 162

EAST ASIA c. 1200 TO 1800

Begins with the transition of East Asia (China, Korea and Japan) from ancient to medieval society and compares it to developments in Europe during the feudal age. Explores the political, economic and cultural relations between the various states in the region as a whole as well as the specific local developments of state and society during this period. Examines the arrival of the first Europeans, traders and then Jesuit and Catholic missionaries, and the resulting radical social realignment within each society stemming from this encounter with the 'outside.'

HST 322

TOPICS IN ASIAN HISTORY

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.
Prerequisites:
HST 199 or HST 299 is a prerequisite for this class.

PHL 287

INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN PHILOSOPHIES

An introduction to Asian Philosophy, examining some of the central philosophical issues and movements in Asian thought, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism.

PHL 387

TOPICS IN ASIAN PHILOSOPHY

Focuses on a particular issue, figure, or period in Asian philosophy. Topics will vary according to instructor.

PHL 388

TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Draws on philosophies from different cultures to explore philosophical issues from a comparative perspective. Topics and areas will vary according to instructor.

PSC 253

ASIAN POLITICS

An introduction to contemporary government and politics in Asia, focusing on China and Japan, with comparative reference to other Asian and non-Asian political systems. Special attention will be made to the emerging political and economic role of the Pacific Rim.

PSC 344

WORLD POLITICAL ECONOMY

Political conflicts over trade relations, global inequality, development, growth, inflation, and scarcity are analyzed, with special emphasis placed on a description of the institutions and processes that shape international economics.

PSC 349

ADVANCED TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Advanced topics in international relations.

REL 241

RELIGION IN CHINESE HISTORY, SOCIETY AND CULTURE

An exploration of the Chinese religious landscape, focusing on social and practical dimensions of Chinese religion, such as state rituals and private cults, liturgies and individual practices of Taoist priests and adepts, politico-religious ideas that inspired popular messianic movements throughout Chinese history, and interrelations of Buddhist and Taoist clergies and institutions in the state.

REL 246

TRADITIONS OF CHINESE POPULAR CULTURE

Promotes an understanding of Chinese worldview and life in the perspective of the common Chinese people from ancient to modern times. Based on historical and modern texts in translation, some historical and ethnographic studies, as well as visual and aural materials, the course explores gender and generational relations and conflicts, ancestor veneration, the worlds of ghosts and gods, festivals, art, and entertainment, but also aspects of misery and social unrest. Although the course will draw largely on popular and entertaining sources, it will also pay attention to historical developments, the relationship between popular and elite traditions, as well as sociological and anthropological issues arising from these contexts.

REL 248

LITERATURE AND RELIGION IN CHINA

Focuses on the interpretation of literature and religion in China. Considers original works of literature and explores the religious origins of Chinese script and writing itself, poetry and mystical philosophy, cosmology and revealed scripture, popular tales, ballads, plays and novels, and the reworking of contemporary Chinese American authors of their literary and religious heritage, with attention to their historical, social, religious and social dimensions, as well as to the individual experience expressed in them.

REL 341

TAOISM: CHINA'S INDIGENOUS HIGH RELIGION

A study of Taoist thought, imagination and expression, through sacred literature, the organization of clergy, and the nature and function of its institutions in interaction with the authority of the Chinese state, with Buddhism, and with the broader scheme of popular Chinese culture and religion.

REL 343

MORAL PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS IN CHINA

An exploration of Chinese ethics the philosophical, religious and socio-political traditions which shaped them and were formed by them. Considers the major philosophical schools of China's classical age--Confucianism, Monism, Taoism, and Legalism--with Han dynasty cosmology, the ethical orientations of the Taoist and Buddhist religions, neo-Confucianism, and also the traumatic encounter with western power and thought. Addresses comparative issues concerning traditional Chinese values in relation to western views, particularly in terms of modern relations between China (and East Asia) and the west.

WLE 360

SECOND, WORLD AND HERITAGE LANGUAGE ACQUISITION K-12

This course is an introduction to the theoretical study of second, world and heritage language acquisition (SLA) from a generative and psycholinguistic perspective at the K-12 levels. The content of the class is founded on the major concepts and issues of language acquisition, including UG-access, L1-transfer, age effects, and the acquisition of form vs. meaning. The course pays particular attention to empirical second and world language studies at the syntax/semantics interface. Course readings and discussion examine the complexities of the processes involved in acquiring a world language that includes the relation between first and SLA; contrastive and error analysis; interlanguage; the social and cultural influences on SLA; learner variability; learning strategies; and classroom interaction analysis. Issues surrounding second and world language acquisition are discussed and deliberated through university classroom experiences as well as required field experiences (20/15 hours; level 2).

EDU 25

BASIC TECHNOLOGY LITERACY

(0 Credit) This online course provides students with a knowledge about assembling, using, and troubleshooting basic technology hardware and software. In this course, students demonstrate understanding of basic computer setup and the use of peripheral devices such as printers, speakers, flash drives, scanners, digital cameras, videos, and computer software.

SCU 207

SOCIAL AND HISTORICAL ISSUES IN EDUCATION

This course examines through an interdisciplinary framework sociological and historical issues and concerns associated with the relationship between education and public life. The course analyzes education as a form of cultural power, addressing its political and ideological effects. Emphasis will be placed upon the social and historical meanings and purposes assigned to education, especially as it pertains to questions of race, gender, sexuality, and the political economy of class.

SCU 337

HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

This course is an introduction to the study of the process of human development from conception to old age. Through a range of theories, the periods of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood are examined with particular attention to the role of culture, gender, and class as they inform the contextualized process of growth and change across the life span.

EE 281

INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE

This is the first in a sequence of theory and practice courses that serves to familiarize teaching candidates with the world of elementary and middle schools. Through observation and participation in schools, self-reflection, independently created assignments, cooperative learning assignments and classroom discussion, candidates will acquire familiarity with schools and classrooms including: social/cultural context, classroom climate, classroom management, curricular coherence, standards-based instruction, and teacher professional beliefs and practices. Written critical reflections and papers serve as initial foundation for the development of teaching philosophies. Required field experiences are integrated into this course.

SEC 364

METHODS: CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS

(4 credits) This course will examine materials, methods, and techniques appropriate for teaching in secondary schools. Topics include: educational goals; the development of a rationale and underlying assumptions; instructional goals and objectives; learning objectives; both cognitive and affective; classroom environment; classroom management principles and techniques; multicultural materials in various content areas; the development of appropriate methods and materials; current curriculum issues and controversies. 30 Level 1 Field Experience hours at arranged sites.
Prerequisites:
SEC 363 or status as a major in World Language Education is a prerequisite for this class.

PE 206

PERSONAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH

This course is designed to assist students in gaining insight into their health/wellness attitudes, behaviors, and choices. Health/wellness experiences and topics examine the total wellness concept, as a self-designed, dynamic style of living which focuses on optimal functioning and quality of life. Emphasis is placed on the physical, emotional, intellectual, social, occupational and spiritual dimensions of health/wellness.

PE 273

HEALTH AND NUTRITION

This course will provide students with an introductory background in nutrition throughout the life span. The study of foods and their effects upon health, development and performance of the individual will be emphasized. Software analysis of dietary intakes will facilitate an individual reflective approach to an application of the content.

LSI 346

STRATEGIES FOR MAINSTREAMING AND INCLUSION

Focus will be on the practical problems related to the integration of exceptional children and youth into regular classrooms. Identification, characteristics, programs, curricular variations, and techniques for securing maximum development of students with a variety of special needs with emphasis on learning disabilities. The course also covers historical background, as well as current legal and service provision issues, including mainstreaming and inclusion. PREREQUISITE(S): Junior standing.
Prerequisites:
Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing is a prerequisite for this class.

WLE 349

STANDARD AND CONTENT-BASED METHODS OF TEACHING WORLD LANGUAGES K-12

This course prepares candidates to teach world languages at the elementary, middle and secondary school levels consonant with an aligned approach to meeting national and state WLE standards and Common Core standards. It examines the theory and practice of traditional or standard methods of teaching world languages (e.g., communicative approach, natural approach, etc.) with an emphasis on developing alternative, post-method strategies and using diverse resources, as well as on reformulating world languages instruction to integrate subject matter content into the curriculum, including science, social studies, math, fine arts, etc. Engages candidates in understanding and applying the ?Five Cs??Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities outlined in the national standards?toward this end. Lesson and unit development, evaluation/assessment, and classroom management also will be discussed. Issues that emerge in planning and instruction are discussed and deliberated through university classroom experiences as well as required fieldwork (20/15 hours; level 1 in language of certification).
Prerequisites:
Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing is a prerequisite for this class.

WLE 350

METHODS OF TEACHING WORLD LANGUAGES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

This course is designed to provide training in the theory and methods of teaching Foreign Languages in the elementary school (FLES) to both pre- and in-service teachers. Pre-service teachers include World Language majors interested in elementary school teaching and elementary majors who are proficient in a world language and interested in teaching FLES. In-service teachers include elementary teachers proficient in a world language who are teaching or who are interested in teaching FLES and secondary trained teachers who are teaching or who are interested in teaching FLES. In order to meet the objectives of this course and subsequent methods courses, it is expected that all participants be able to demonstrate proficiency in English and a second language before enrolling. Issues surrounding elementary methods are discussed and deliberated through university classroom experiences as well as required field experiences (20 hours, minimum; level 2).

WLE 370

SECOND & WORLD LANGUAGE LITERACIES AND CULTURES

This course examines the interdisciplinary study of first, second and world languages and multiple L1 and L2 literacies in their cultural, social, and political contexts, with emphasis on issues of ethnicity, identity, social class, gender, power, and other related topics relative to ideologies of reading and writing the world through reading and writing the word. Especial focus is placed on these topics as they pertain to the extant research on language, literacy, and culture represented in the WLE certification language communities, as well as in the literature, art, music, and popular culture of those communities as means of advocating students? sense of identity as global citizens (20/15 hours; level 1).

SCU 338

THE PROCESS AND EVALUATION OF LEARNING

The process involved in human learning is examined from alternative theoretical and research paradigms and perspectives. The roles of emotions, cultural differences, social realities, cognitive uniqueness, character and achievement tendencies are examined with respect to learner functioning. Alternative methods and techniques for evaluating learner development and academic achievement are surveyed and discussed. Emphasis is placed upon identifying the characteristics of individually and culturally responsive and responsible testing and assessment protocols in the school setting.
Prerequisites:
Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing is a prerequisite for this class.

SCU 339

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY OF YOUTH AND MIDDLE LEVEL EDUCATION

This course introduces foundational and contemporary theories of youth and adolescent development. It provides an investigation of how these theoretical ideas relate to contemporary questions of youth and middle level education. The course explores the historical invention of adolescence, changing ideas about the meaning of childhood, as well as some of the broader social, economic, political, and cultural implications of these changing ideas. This course seeks to develop in prospective educators a broader capacity to theorize about youth and schooling and, hence, to act critically and reflectively in multiple contexts in which youth learn.
Prerequisites:
Advanced Teacher Candidate Standing is a prerequisite for this class.

WRD 98

PREPARATION FOR COLLEGE READING

For students who need extra preparation in the development of college reading skills. Emphasizes development of reading strategies suitable for understanding a range of texts.

WRD 101

BASIC WRITING I

An introduction to academic writing; extensive practice in gathering and organizing ideas; attention to correctness in mechanics, grammar, and usage. Students placed in 101 are required to enroll subsequently in 102.

MAT 94

BASIC ALGEBRA

The objective of this course is to increase the students' competence in working with ordinary arithmetic, using a large variety of practical problems and situations from basic sciences as motivation. Formerly WRC 104.

MAT 95

INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA

An introduction to functions, linear equations, linear inequalities, absolute values, systems of linear equations, exponents, and polynomials. Formerly WRC 204.
Prerequisites:
MAT 094or placement is a prerequisite for this course.

EDU 95

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH CHILDREN AND YOUTH

(no credit) Required of all students. Observations and participatory experience with children and youth in a school or agency. This course is a prerequisite for student teaching and related professional courses.

WLE 384

CAPSTONE IN WORLD LANGUAGE EDUCATION

This course is taken concurrently with WLE 385, Student Teaching in World Languages. In this course, students will have opportunities to reflect on their student teaching experience and prepare materials to support their employment searches and career as teachers. COREQUISITE(S): WLE 385.

WLE 385

STUDENT TEACHING IN WORLD LANGUAGES

(12 credits) Student teaching is the culminating experience of the World Languages certification program. It is a ten-week, 30-hour/week experience. Students must successfully complete student teaching with a grade of B- or better in a language classroom in which they are seeking certification to teach. The course is taken concurrently with WLE 384, World Languages Capstone. PREREQUISITE(S): Application and approval required. Open only to DePaul students.

WLE 326

THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF ESL AND WLE

Presents an introduction to the field of second and world language, with attention to basic concepts of second language acquisition in various language learning contexts. Discusses interdisciplinary perspectives of second and world language acquisition and their application to classroom practices. Topics include interlanguage, communicative competence, D/discourses, investment/motivation, sociocultural approaches to language learning, universal grammar, etc. The different factors influencing the acquisition of ESL and WLE are examined as well as current research in applied linguistics and different approaches to language teaching.

WLE 375

WLE HISTORY, POLICY, AND CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT

This course engages students in WLE curriculum development and language program advocacy, creation, and sustainability based on an examination of federal and state WLE history and policies and on a review of national and state standards. Reviews theory and application of curriculum development to world language instructional programs, such as design, scope and sequence, organizational patterns, materials and media, teacher training, parent and community involvement, and evaluation. Principal world language education program models are examined and analyzed in light of WLE history, policy, and standards (20/15 hours; level 1).
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