Catalog Version

Winter/Spring/Summer 2014-2015
Catalog update:
October 17, 2014

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Students are required to follow the Academic Handbook and Code of Student Responsibility​​

The State Board of Education authorizes higher education institutions with approved teacher preparation programs to offer subsequent licensure programs. Under the rules for licensure and assignment of educational staff, subsequent licensure are to be earned through passage of all relevant tests and completion of either a full or "focused" licensure program offered by an institution of higher education.

DePaul offers subsequent licensure programs in the following areas of teacher education:

  • Early Childhood Education
  • Elementary Education
  • Secondary Education (English, Math, Science, History, Social Science, Visual Arts)
  • World Languages Education (K-12)
  • Special Education (LBS1)

Each institution is expected to provide candidates with information about how to apply for such a licensure program and how, in the case of focused programs, the institution will determine what prior coursework and experience can be counted toward the requirements for the subsequent licensure. Candidates who complete a full or focused subsequent licensure program will be recommended for the license by entitlement. The following is a summary of the policies on focused programs at DePaul University. 

General Policies

  • These are licensure-only programs and do not lead to a degree. However, degree options are available, and candidates could subsequently apply to the appropriate degree program.
  • All courses must be taken at DePaul; no transfer credit is allowed.
  • General education courses are not required.
  • Accepted candidates are admitted to the T&L or LLSI licensure-only program and upon admission have advanced standing (no additional requirements for admission to the Unit).
  • Accepted candidates will initially meet with a program faculty member and subsequently with a College of Education advisor who will review all credentials and determine a program that prepares the candidate to meet the teacher preparation standards for the license desired and that meets the minimum requirements (as set out below).
  • These focused programs are subject to change during the course of the program. If assessments of the candidate's performance suggest that the program plan should have additional requirements, the program will be modified accordingly.
  • Accepted candidates will be required to complete student teaching at the grade level and/or content area in which the license is sought OR complete an intensive internship that will include extended contact hours with students at the grade level in which the license is sought and will include a demonstration of teaching proficiency at this grade level. The candidate’s faculty advisor will determine the nature of the internship.

Admission Requirements

If you hold a valid teaching license in the state of Illinois, you may enroll in a program designed to help you obtain a subsequent license in the following areas: early childhood education; elementary education; secondary education; world languages education; and special education.

In order to be considered for admission for a Subsequent Teaching, you must hold bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university and hold a valid teaching license. To apply, please a submit a completed application as specified by the admission requirements for the teaching and learning program or the special education for licensed teachers program. In addition to the standard application materials, you must also submit a valid Illinois teaching license and a letter from your school principal providing evidence of prior teaching experience and teaching performance. (If you are currently not employed as a teacher, then other evidence of prior teaching experience must be provided.) In addition, evidence of having passed the Illinois Basic Skills/TAP Test must be submitted by the end of the first quarter of completed course work.

In addition to the standard requirements for admission to graduate programs, candidates must submit:

  • Valid Illinois Teaching License
  • A letter from candidate’s School Principal giving evidence of prior teaching experience and teaching performance (If the candidate is currently not employed as a teacher, then other evidence of prior teaching experience must be provided).
  • Evidence of having passed the Illinois TAP Test (If a waiver was granted for this test by ISBE due to the candidate holding a license in another state or if a candidate does not have evidence of having passed the test, the candidate must provide evidence of passing before the end of her or his first quarter at DPU).

Subsequent Licensure Requirements for the following programs are provided below:

  • Early Childhood Education
  • Elementary Education
  • Secondary Education (English, Math, Science, History, Social Science, Visual Arts)
  • World Languages Education (K-12)
  • Special Education (LBS1)

Besides meeting the following requirements, each program completer is expected to demonstrate the appropriate professional dispositions.  A list of those dispositions are provided below.

Subsequent Licensure Requirements for Early Childhood Education

Accepted candidates will initially meet with a member of the program faculty and subsequently with a College of Education advisor who will review all credentials and determine a program that prepares the candidate to meet the teacher preparation standards for the license desired and that meets the following minimum requirements:

Course Requirements

A minimum of 6 courses from:

Student Teaching or Internship Requirements (to be determined by faculty advisor)

  • 12 weeks of student teaching in early childhood education         
    or 1 candidate-specific internship, as defined by faculty advisor (T&L 615, Research and Internship in Education)

Licensure Requirements

  • Illinois Test of Academic Proficiency (TAP)
  • Early Childhood Content Area Test
  • Early Childhood APT Test
  • Health & Nutrition Competency

Subsequent Licensure Requirements for Elementary Education

Accepted candidates will initially meet with a member of the program faculty and subsequently with a College of Education advisor who will review all credentials and determine a program that prepares the candidate to meet the teacher preparation standards for the license desired and that meets the following minimum requirements:

Course Requirements

A minimum of 6 courses from:

Student Teaching or Internship Requirements (to be determined by faculty advisor)

  • 10 weeks of student teaching in elementary education  
    or 1 candidate-specific internship, as defined by faculty advisor (T&L 615, Research and Internship in Education)

Licensure Requirements

  • Illinois Test of Academic Proficiency (TAP)
  • Elementary Education Content Area Test
  • Elementary APT Test

Subsequent Licensure Requirements for Secondary Education

Accepted candidates will initially meet with a member of the program faculty and subsequently with a College of Education advisor who will review all credentials and determine a program that prepares the candidate to meet the teacher preparation standards for the license desired and that meets the following minimum requirements:

Course Requirements

A minimum of 6 courses from:

Content Area Requirements

A minimum of 32 semester hours is required in the subject area the candidate intends to teach. Deficiencies in the content area will be evaluated by program faculty. Secondary content area deficiencies may be taken at the undergraduate level and may require courses in addition to the minimum requirements above.

Student Teaching or Internship Requirements (to be determined by faculty advisor)

  • 10 weeks of student teaching in secondary education
    or 1 candidate-specific internship, as defined by faculty advisor (T&L 615, Research and Internship in Education)

Licensure Requirements

  • Illinois Test of Academic Proficiency (TAP)
  • English, Math, Science, Social Science or Visual Arts Content Area Test
  • Secondary APT Test

Subsequent Licensure Requirements for World Language Education

Accepted candidates will initially meet with a member of the program faculty and subsequently with a College of Education advisor who will review all credentials and determine a program that prepares the candidate to meet the teacher preparation standards for the license desired and that meets the following minimum requirements:

Course Requirements

A minimum of 6 courses from:

Content Area Requirements

A minimum of 32 semester hours is required in the world language the candidate intends to teach. Deficiencies in the content area will be evaluated by program faculty. World language content area deficiencies may be taken at the undergraduate level and may require courses in addition to the minimum requirements below:

Student Teaching or Internship Requirements (to be determined by faculty advisor)

  • 10 weeks of student teaching in world language education
    or
    1 candidate-specific internship, as defined by faculty advisor (T&L 615, Research and Internship in Education)

Licensure Requirements

  • Illinois Test of Academic Proficiency (TAP)
  • ACTFL Oral Language Proficiency Interview Or DePaul Oral Language Proficiency Exam (Spanish only)
  • Foreign Language Content Area Test
  • Secondary APT Test

Dispositions

The academic programs within the College of Education have set forth these dispositions as educational and professional expectations for all students.  Students should be aware that failing to abide by DePaul University or College of Education policies including, under certain circumstances, these dispositions, could result in adverse consequences for the student, including removal from his or her program, the College of Education, or the University.

  • Reflects on progress and identifies strengths and weaknesses, including evaluating strategies for success, finding alternatives for inappropriate strategies, and modifying future practices
  • Is receptive to faculty feedback and acts meaningfully and professionally upon suggestions.
  • Values critical thinking, including engaging theoretical and philosophical frameworks and shows evidence of critical thinking through discussion and writing (e.g., journals, response to prompts)
  • Understands the importance of and is committed to communicating clearly orally and in writing both in traditional and in new and emerging digital formats
  • Values and is committed to continually developing strong content area knowledge and/or knowledge of the professional field, including pedagogical content knowledge
  • Takes initiative, uses imagination and creativity, and seeks out information using a variety of human and material resources and technology to inform his or her teaching
  • Is aware of the role of classroom environment and uses management procedures that reflect respect and care for learners and concern for their emotional and physical well being
  • Takes the time and effort needed to understand how students learn, including discovering their interests and experiences and determining how to shape teaching acts (using technology as appropriate) that engage learners meaningfully and actively
  • Values and is committed to using assessment to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of the learner
  • Respects and considers cultural contexts in order to determine how to be responsive to learners and to proactively promote all students' learning
  • Values and is responsive to diverse learners' academic, emotional, and social needs through teaching acts (including careful instructional planning, implementation, and differentiation) and through everyday interactions with students
  • Is committed to collaboration with colleagues, families, and communities in order to promote all students' learning and development
  • Recognizes and fulfills professional responsibilities and habits of conduct (e.g., dress, language, preparedness, attendance, punctuality, etc.)
  • Demonstrates collegiality, honesty, good judgment, courtesy, respect, and diplomacy
  • Balances self-confidence and assertiveness with respect for others' perspectives
  • Respects the requirements, expectations, and procedures of both the College of Education and of our field partners and appreciates the issues of trust, fairness, and professionalism involved

Subsequent Licensure Requirements for Special Education (LBS1)

Accepted candidates will initially meet with a member of the program faculty and subsequently with a College of Education advisor who will review all credentials and determine a program that prepares the candidate to meet the teacher preparation standards for the license desired and that meets the following minimum requirements:

Course Requirements

Content Area Requirements

Because special educators must be prepared to teach a variety of subjects at a variety of grades, candidates must have a solid foundation in the content areas below.  Deficiencies in the content area will be evaluated as part of the application process. Deficiencies may be taken at the undergraduate level and may require courses in addition to the minimum requirements below

1 college course in each of the following:

  • Writing
  • Fine Art of Literature
  • Science    
  • Math
  • US History or US Government
  • Social Science

Practicum Requirements

Licensure Requirements

  • Illinois Test of Academic Proficiency (TAP)
  • General Education Content for Special Educators
  • Special Education Content Area Test
  • K-12 APT Test  (if not passed already)

Dispositions

The academic programs within the College of Education have set forth these dispositions as educational and professional expectations for all students.  Students should be aware that failing to abide by DePaul University or College of Education policies including, under certain circumstances, these dispositions, could result in adverse consequences for the student, including removal from his or her program, the College of Education, or the University.

  • Is receptive to faculty feedback and acts meaningfully and professionally upon suggestions
  • Reflects on his or her own progress, identifies strengths and weaknesses, and evaluates strategies for success and professional growth
  • Takes initiative
  • Is open to new ideas and engagement in learning
  • Respects diversity and cultural contexts to determine how to be responsive to learners and to proactively promote all students' learning
  • Expresses positive attitudes toward individuals with disabilities and a willingness to advocate on their behalf
  • Is committed to collaboration with colleagues, families, and communities in order to promote all students' learning and development
  • Demonstrates professional ethical and legal behavior as defined by the respective codes of ethics and laws
  • Demonstrates consistent professional behavior across all academic settings
  • Maintains appropriate interpersonal and professional boundaries
  • Accepts personal responsibility for one's behavior
  • Expresses feelings and opinions effectively and appropriately
  • Upholds confidentiality