Catalog Version

Winter/Spring/Summer 
2013- 2014

Catalog update:
October 15, 2013

Access archived catalogs in the Catalog Archive section.​​​​​

Students are required to follow the Academic Handbook and Code of Student Responsibility

Course Requirements

The Master of Arts in Journalism requires 12 courses (48-credit hours) — three core courses, a minimum of six elective courses in Journalism, and a maximum of three outside electives.

Core Courses

Students are required to take all of the following:

Journalism Electives 

Students select a minimum of six courses from the following list:

Outside Electives

With approval from the graduate program director, students can take up to three relevant elective courses from other Communication graduate programs, or relevant graduate elective courses from outside of Communication. Examples of courses students have taken previously are:

Grade Requirements

Students must maintain a 3.0 average in their graduate work to remain in good academic standing. Students who drop below this average will be put on academic probation and will be expected to attain the minimum requirement within two quarters. Failure to do so may result in dismissal from the program.​

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JOUR 530

RADIO NEWS

The radio news business has been radically altered through the rise of new media. This course analyzes that transformation. The move of radio news to the web has greatly increased opportunities for local and community-based reporting. Radio News helps students acquire the skill sets they'll need to do socially responsible work in this new and challenging environment. This course prepares students for careers in radio news and documentary by training them in the audio platforms and news narratives that have made radio one of the strongest of personalized, niche media in the digital landscape.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 535

RADIO DEPAUL

The course enables students in journalism to learn on air and production skills in news, public affairs, and sports programming. This experiential learning class enables students to work at our award-winning student radio operation, where participants host shows, cover DePaul sports, and develop long format news, interviews, and public affairs programming.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 536

SPORTS BLOGGING

Blogging has become an essential component of all sports coverage, and this course will provide the skills to excel in this growing area of journalism. Students will learn about news tracking, news aggregation, the fundamentals of blog posts, social media and multimedia in blogging, live blogging, and being part of an online community. By building blogs they?ll have an opportunity to brand themselves as sports journalists and learn how to become an authoritative voice in a particular area of sports.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 537

FROM FRANKLIN TO THE INTERNET: A HISTORY OF AMERICAN JOURNALISM

This course analyzes the impact journalism has had and is having on the country and the impact technologies have had on journalism. We examine the stories journalism tells, how it tells them, and the difference it makes in American society, culture, and politics.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 538

MASS COMMUNICATION IN THE DIGITAL AGE

This course examines the rise of the information age through the development of new media platforms and the changing impact media are having in creating community and shaping citizenship and American life as journalism, radio, television, film, advertising, and public relations transition from analog to digital eras.
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 539

THE FUTURE OF AD-SUPPORTED MEDIA

This is a lab course designed to have journalism and advertising students work together to develop news business models for the news media. Student teams will work with media clients---in print, online, and broadcast---to better understand how the nature of news is being redefined. The course will probe all aspects of the media business, including editorial, marketing, advertising, new revenue sources, and circulation. (Cross-listed with PRAD 595 Special Topics in Public Relations & Advertising)
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 540

THE INTERNET, TECHNOLOGY, AND POLITICS

This course explores the evolving relationships that reside at the intersection of the internet and politics. Some of the themes covered in the course include the ways in which politicians and organizations use the internet and new media and how this is changing the relationship between governments and citizens. (Cross-listed with PSC 315 Internet, Technology and Politics)
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.

JOUR 541

MASS MEDIA & AMERICAN POLITICS

This course explores the role of the media in American politics and the impact it has on government, policymaking, campaigning, and most importantly, the general public. The course has three major sections: an analysis of the news media as a political and economic institution; an examination of the ways in which political actors try to shape the messages transmitted through the media; and an investigation of the effects media have on citizens. (Cross-listed with PSC 321 Mass Media and American Politics)
Prerequisites:
Status as a Graduate Journalism student is a prerequisite for this class.