Course Requirements

Major Electives

Competency in Management Applications

Competency in Government, Regulation, and Compliance

Competency in User Interaction

Competency in Software Development

Open Electives

Open elective credit also is required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours.

Degree Requirements

Students in this degree must meet the following requirements:

  • Complete a minimum of 192 credit hours (generally 48 courses).
  • Earn a grade of C- or higher in WRD 103, WRD 104, and all Major and Minor courses.
  • Earn a grade of D or higher in all other Liberal Studies and Open Elective courses.
  • Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher.

ACC 101

INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING I

Introduction to Accounting I, provides an introduction to financial accounting as the means of recording, storing and summarizing economic events of the business enterprise to meet external reporting needs. Emphasis is placed on the preparation and analysis of financial statements and other financial reports to the public based on the accounting equation, accrual accounting concepts, and data gathering techniques. Topics include corporate accounting for current and longterm assets and current liabilities, and the corporate income statement. PREREQUISITE(S): MAT 130 or equivalent and adequate performance on the University Assessment tests in reading, writing, and mathematics.
Prerequisites:
MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

MKT 301

PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING

Marketing 301 introduces basic marketing terminology and the relationships between and among these terms relevant to the creation and implementation of basic marketing strategy. The course content also focuses upon the controllable and uncontrollable variables which have bearing on the success or failure of marketing programs. The course also provides students with opportunities to demonstrate their ability to connect concepts discussed in the text and those same concepts appearing in academic and practitioner publications and popular business periodicals. PREREQUISITE(S): MAT 137 (Formerly BMS 142) or equivalent.
Prerequisites:
MAT 137 or equivalent is a prerequisite for this class.

CSC 212

PROGRAMMING IN JAVA II

Intermediate programming in Java and problem solving. Writing Java programs with multiple classes: constructors, visibility modifiers, static members, accessor and mutator methods, and arrays of objects. Inheritance, polymorphism, and interfaces. Sorting arrays of primitive data and arrays of objects. Exception handling. PREREQUISITE(S): CSC 211.

CSC 211

PROGRAMMING IN JAVA I

Introduction to programming in Java and problem solving. Variables, data types, input/output, using objects and methods from the standard classes (such as String and Scanner), control structures, writing methods, arrays. Solving problems with algorithms and implementing algorithms in Java.

IIT 320

THERMODYNAMICS

Introduction to thermodynamics including properties of matter: First Law of Thermodynamics; and its use in analyzing open and closed systems; limitations of the Second Law of thermodynamics; entropy. (Taught at Illinois Institute of Technology as MMAE 320.)

ORGC 212

SMALL GROUP COMMUNICATION (Formerly CMNS 212)

A survey of the variables operating in group interactions. Combines principles with practice through participation in small group experiences. Topics include group formation, group formats, organizational approaches, decision-making models, group observation and evaluation. (Group) (Formerly CMNS 212)

INTC 220

PUBLIC SPEAKING (Formerly CMNS 220)

Introduction to the skills required in a variety of public speaking settings. Includes units on delivery, language, defining speech purposes and content, finding supporting material, organization, and audience analysis. Students will be required to present speeches. Background in basic writing and library skills is necessary. (Formerly CMNS 220)

WRD 204

TECHNICAL WRITING (FORMERLY ENG 204)

In this course, students learn to communicate and interpret specialized information for readers' practical use. The course highlights the action-orientated goals of technical writing and the importance of accurately communicating information to users. The course provides an overview of key issues related to technical writing such as usability, audience analysis, designing pages and screens, effective collaboration with peers, interpreting and presenting data, and writing clearly and persuasively. Students learn to write, revise and present common technical writing genres such as instructions, tutorials, manuals, reports, product/process descriptions, proposals, and oral presentations. Formerly ENG 204.

WRD 301

WRITING IN WORKPLACE CONTEXTS (FORMERLY ENG 301)

Students examine the roles of writing (transactional, informative, and persuasive) in professional contexts and learn common features of workplace writing situations (internal vs. external documents, collaboration, distribution of expertise and authority, content management, globalization) and strategies for responding to them. They will also learn about stylistic conventions common to workplace genres (building an effective professional persona through writing - tone, document design) and their typical formats. Theory and analysis will ground discussions of production and production-based projects. Formerly ENG 301.

IS 280

COMMUNICATION FOR THE GLOBAL IT PROFESSIONAL

Development of professional communication and collaboration skills for the global IT workplace. Students cultivate proficiency with traditional in-person and electronic communications, modeling the conflict resolution, personal initiative, and personal presentation behaviors necessary for career advancement. Students become comfortable users of virtual communication and collaboration toolsets such as VoIP, collaborative editors, web presentation software, virtual team portals, and virtual scheduling tools. PREREQUISITE(S): WRD 104. For students required to take LSP 120, it is also a prerequisite.