Course Requirements

To attain a Bachelor of Arts in Peace, Justice and Conflict Studies, students will be required to complete successfully the following 192 credit hour program, with a minimum of 52 required credit hours in the Peace, Justice and Conflict Studies program:

The four-course sequence PAX 210-212-214-218 forms the foundation of the program and should be completed in the first or second year of study. They do not need to be done in sequence. An internship, PAX 392, should be completed prior to taking PAX 300 and 350.  If possible, students should take the internship prior to senior year.  Seniors should plan to take the senior seminar, PAX 300, and the capstone, PAX 350. Two PAX workshops (2 credit hours each) can be completed at any time, ideally prior to senior year.

Senior Seminar

Students will do a senior seminar PAX 300 either in their junior or senior year.  Each seminar will deal with one area of theory within Peace, Justice and Conflict Studies, for example, human rights theory, theories of peace-building; theories of social & comparative justice.

Students are also required to do the capstone course in Peace, Justice and Conflict Studies, PAX 350, so that they can bring together theory and practices learned throughout the course of the major. PAX 300 and 350 are offered as a sequence in winter and spring quarter. Students doing study abroad during winter or spring quarter of their senior year must do the sequence in their junior year.

Distribution Requirements

Students will select the four electives from the list approved by the Program. The four electives must meet the following distribution requirements:

  • One elective of the four needs to be at the 300-level.
  • Within their four electives, students must either take at least 1 course from two different departments or interdisciplinary programs or count no more than 3 courses from any one department or interdisciplinary program.
  • Two additional PAX 250 workshops may count as one elective (for 4 credit hours), as can any PAX course that is not part of the PAX Core.

For students doing the single major in Peace, Justice and Conflict Studies, it is recommended that they use an elective slot to take an appropriate methodology course in consultation with their major plan advisor.

Program Approved Electives

Courses cross-listed with any listed below are accepted as PAX electives.  Check with the PJC Director for topics courses approved as PAX electives each quarter or to approve a course not on this list. ​

LAS: African and Black Diaspora Studies

LAS: Anthropology

LAS: Art, Media and Design

LAS: Catholic Studies

LAS: Community Service Studies

LAS: Comparative Literature

LAS: English

LAS: Geography 

LAS: Global Asian Studies

LAS: History

LAS: History of Art and Architecture 

Honors Program 

LAS: International Studies  

LAS: Islamic World Studies 

LAS: Latino and Latin American Studies

LAS: Lesbian, Gay, Queer & Transgender Studies

LAS: Peace, Justice and Conflict Studies 

LAS: Philosophy

LAS: Political Science

LAS: Public Policy Studies

LAS: Religious Studies

LAS: Sociology

LAS: Women's and Gender Studies

LAS: Writing, Rhetoric and Discourse

College of Communication

College of Education

College of Science and Health:  Environmental Sciences/Environmental Studies

College of Science and Health: Psychology

School for New Learning

Open Electives

Open elective credit also is required to meet the minimum graduation requirement of 192 hours.

ART 382

INTEGRATING ART INTO THE CURRICULUM AND THE COMMUNITY

This course brings DePaul students into a Chicago grade school to incorporate art into the curriculum. It is a hybrid course that involves some Independent Study in which the students organize their schedule in conjunction with a grade school classroom teacher, and some required classes that they must attend on campus at a prescribed time and day. Students are off campus for approximately 10 class sessions. At the start of the quarter, students are given a theoretical background in community-based art education, ethical issues, and social engagement. Working in teams, students will observe in the classrooms to gain a sense of the grade school community and the existing curriculum. DePaul students will then develop and teach a specific lesson plan in collaboration with the classroom teacher. The objective will be to produce a creative learning experience that co-mingles art and a core subject such as science or social studies. Teaching this art integrated lesson will be an essential aspect of the learning experience. Students will meet back at the DePaul classroom at designated intervals for information, reflection, and the analysis of their experience and their impact on the grade school community, in relations to the theoretical examples from the beginning of the course. These reflections take varied forms: discussion, role-playing exercise, presentation, and papers. Approved for JYEL and cbSL credit. Formerly ART 283.

CTH 243

ROMAN CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL THINKING

A study of the Roman Catholic tradition of "faith seeking understanding" examining the content and the process of emergence of Catholic beliefs about such matters as God, sin, Jesus Christ, revelation, the church and eschatology. Cross-listed with REL 280.

CTH 389

SPECIAL TOPICS IN THE SOCIAL DIMENSION OF CATHOLICISM

SPECIAL TOPICS IN THE SOCIAL DIMENSION OF CATHOLICISM

HST 133

AFRICA, 1900-PRESENT

The workings of the colonial system, the rise and course of independence movements, and the history of individual African states since independence. Formerly HST 229.

A&S 491

ADMINISTRATIVE THEORY AND BEHAVIOR

This course concerns theoretical concepts and empirical research relating to administrative behavior in organizations with special reference to educational organizations. Concepts are examined within the typical decisional framework of supervisors, chief school business officers, principles, and superintendents, and similar positions in the helping professions. Assignments are individualized.
Prerequisites:
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student is a prerequisite for this class.

LST 300

SPECIAL TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

SPECIAL TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

PHL 241

ETHICS AND PUBLIC POLICY

A study of the ways in which ethics can assist us in thinking about matters of public policy.

PSC 214

POLITICS AND MULTICULTURALISM

This course examines the theoretical and practical dilemmas facing multicultural societies, with special emphasis on the United States. Special attention is paid to questions of identity, integration, and separatism.

PSC 233

POLITICAL IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES

An introduction to the enduring political issues confronted by major theorists and political traditions. (Please note that the catalog number for this course was changed from PSC 203 to PSC 233 effective Autumn, 2001.)

PSC 342

ARMS, SECURITY, AND WAR

Focus is on the military dimensions of international politics, such as nuclear and conventional deterrence, arms races, arms control, alliances, and American defense policy, and how those affect war and peace.

PSC 346

THE UNITED NATIONS AND WORLD PROBLEMS

This course will examine the historical and theoretical foundations of the United Nations, particularly in light of the changing problems and issues that confront the global community, such as international peace and security, global economic inequality, and environmental and human rights norms.

PSC 347

ETHICS IN WORLD POLITICS

Drawing on general theories of international relations and historical cases, this course examines both the forces that inhibit the development and effectiveness of ethical norms at the international level and the conditions under which such norms develop and affect the behavior of states and other actors.

HC 271

WOMEN'S PSYCHOSOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

This course focuses on how adult women change, grow, and develop in light of psychological and social-cultural forces that interact in their lives. We consider how core concepts such as self-in-relationship, transition and change, and ways of knowing play out in various aspects of women's lives. In exploring different pathways of development for women, we will draw on the life themes of students in the course as well as on theories and models that help identity unique patterns of women's psychological development (alternatives to male-based theories of adult development). This interactive course emphasizes group discussion and guided reflection. Pre-1999 Competencies: AL-D, HC-4, HC-C. BA-1999 Competencies: H-3-A, H-3-B, H-3-C. Faculty: Catherine Marienau

AI 229

CONFLICT, COLONIALISM AND COMMERCE: ENCOUNTERING THAILAND AND ITS NEIGHBORS

Drawing on local resources, students will gain valuable understanding of some of the minority cultures in the region and their tenuous relationship to the dominant 'host' culture. By engaging with present- day Thailand, participants will also gain insight into its rich and complex past. Through visits to cultural centers and interactions with local people, participants will experience life among ethnic groups in the Chiang Mai province such as the 'Long-Necked' sub-group of the Karen people, as well as in the border regions of Cambodia and Burma (Myanmar). In Bangkok, we will experience its modern and ancient faces culminating in cultural activities with DePaul alumni living in Thailand.

HC 198

JUVENILE JUSTICE: IS IT WORKING?

This course will explore juvenile justice through a sociological lens that encompasses legal, ethical, institutional, racial, gender and economic perspectives. The course will address the foundation and origin of the juvenile justice system in Illinois and its role as pioneer in juvenile justice throughout the United States. We will examine the various entities responsible for the implementation of juvenile justice including the challenges and obstacles encountered in pursuit of intervention and prevention of juvenile delinquency. A network of professionals dedicated to working with and supporting juveniles involved in the system will speak to how the key institutions interact, combat and collaborate with each other and the impact those dynamics have on the juveniles, their families and communities. The methodologies and efficacy of responses to delinquency such as punishment, incarceration, rehabilitation, substance treatment and re-entry will also be considered. The class will take on such questions as what contributes to juvenile delinquency, how is juvenile delinquency defined, how does it differ amongst communities, how did we get here and what does the future of juvenile delinquency look like in Illinois?

REL 202

ETHICAL WORLDS: MORAL ISSUES ACROSS CULTURES

An exploration of religion and ethics from a comparative and international perspective. Ethical dimensions of diverse world religious traditions will be investigated within their own particular historical and cultural contexts, and students will be asked to consider and evaluate their own ethical orientations in the light of these studies.

SOC 330

THEMES IN SOCIAL THOUGHT

Consideration of the writings of social philosophers regarding the nature, origins and meanings of human society.

SOC 250

GROUP DIVERSITY

Study of cultural identities, values, and interaction of diverse groups. Among the concepts explored will be race, ethnicity, religion, gender, social class, sexual orientation, ableism, and age. The material will draw upon all the social sciences as well as appropriate samples from the literature.

SOC 230

SEX AND GENDER IN THE CITY

Examines the role of sex, sexuality, and gender in urban life, their interaction in urban spaces, and the formation of related private and public social policies.
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