Courses in the Scientific Inquiry (SI) domain are designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn the methods of modern science and its impact in understanding the world around us. Courses are designed to help students develop a more complete perspective about science and the scientific process, including: an understanding of the major principles guiding modern scientific thought; a comprehension of the varying approaches and aspects of science; an appreciation of the connection among the sciences and the fundamental role of mathematics in practicing science; an awareness of the roles and limitations of theories and models in interpreting, understanding, and predicting natural phenomena; and a realization of how these theories and models change or are supplanted as our knowledge increases.

Where required, the Quantitative Reasoning and Technological Literacy sequence (LSP 120 & LSP 121) is a prerequisite for SI Domain courses.  Students have the option to test out of one or both of these courses.  Generally three SI courses are required; depending on their program of study students may be required to take a designated SI Science as a Way of Knowing (SWK), SI Lab, or both.  Students who complete both LSP 120 and LSP 121 will have their total Domain Area requirements reduced by one.  Within the SI Domain, only non-lab SI courses are eligible for this reduction.

Learning Outcomes

Scientific Inquiry: Science as a Way of Knowing 

​Students will be able to:

  • Identify the types of questions that can and cannot be answered by science, and recognize the strengths and limitations of science in answering questions about the natural world.
  • Critically evaluate the assumptions that underlie scientific investigations.
  • Substantiate the claim that scientific knowledge is durable but can evolve with new evidence and perspectives.
  • Connect evidence to the predictions made by theories and hypotheses, and then assess the extent to which the presented evidence supports or refutes a scientific claim.
  • Evaluate the role of creativity, curiosity, skepticism, open‐mindedness and diligence of individuals in scientific discovery and innovation.
  • Recognize the uncertainty inherent in the scientific approach and evaluate scientists’ efforts to minimize and understand its effect through experimental design, data collection, data analysis and interpretation.
  • Evaluate the role of communication, collaboration, diversity and peer review in promoting scientific progress and the quality of scientific evidence and ideas, and ensuring compliance with ethical standards.
  • Determine the extent to which science both influences and is influenced by the societies
  • Apply scientific approaches to problem solving and decision‐making in their own lives, and evaluate how scientific knowledge informs policies, regulations, and personal decisions.

Scientific Inquiry: Lab

​Students will be able to:

  • Understand how science serves as a mechanism for inquiry into the natural world through hands‐on, experience‐based investigation.
  • ​Pose meaningful scientific questions and generate testable scientific
    hypotheses.
  • Plan, design and conduct scientific investigations in a collaborative
    environment using appropriate tools and techniques to gather relevant data in order to test and revise scientific hypotheses.
  • Develop and use scientific models (conceptual, physical, and
    mathematical) to make predictions and develop explanations of natural phenomena.
  • Address variability in the data and recognize and analyze alternative
    explanations and predictions.
  • Communicate scientific procedures.

 Scientific Inquiry: Elective

​Students will be able to:

  • Apply appropriate concepts, tools, and techniques of scientific inquiry.
  • Describe how natural scientific, mathematical, and/or computational methodologies function as mechanisms for inquiry.
  • Explain the interaction between the content of their SI-Elective course and other scientific disciplines or the broader society.

Courses

Below please find examples of courses previously offered for scientific inquiry credit. For information on current offerings, please consult Campus Connection.

Scientific Inquiry: Science as a Way of Knowing Courses

Biological Sciences

Chemistry
Education
Environmental Science

Health Sciences

Physics

School for New Learning 

Scientific Inquiry: Lab Courses

Anthropology

Art Media and Design

Biological Sciences

Chemistry

Computer Graphics and Animation

Digital Cinema

Environmental Science

Nursing

Physics

STEM Studies

Scientific Inquiry: Elective Courses

Anthropology

Biological Sciences

Chemistry

Computer Science

E-Commerce Technology

Environmental Science

French

Geography

Human Computer Interaction

Information Technology

Interactive and Social Media

Mathematics

Physics

Psychology

School for New Learning

Sociology

STEM Studies

​Telecommunication and Data Systems

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