Catalog Version

Autumn 2015-2016
Catalog update: 
May 15, 2015

Access archived catalogs in the Catalog Archive section.​​​​​

Students are required to follow the Academic Handbook and Code of Student Responsibility​​

Courses in the Scientific Inquiry domain are designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn the methods of modern science and its impact in understanding the world around us. Courses are designed to help students develop a more complete perspective about science and the scientific process, including: an understanding of the major principles guiding modern scientific thought; a comprehension of the varying approaches and aspects of science; an appreciation of the connection among the sciences and the fundamental role of mathematics in practicing science; an awareness of the roles and limitations of theories and models in interpreting, understanding, and predicting natural phenomena; and a realization of how these theories and models change or are supplanted as our knowledge increases.

Where required, the Quantitative Reasoning and Technological Literacy sequence (LSP 120 & LSP 121) is a prerequisite for SI Domain courses.  Students have the option to test out of one or both of these courses.  Generally three SI courses are required and one course must be designated as an SI lab course. Students who complete both LSP 120 and LSP 121 will have their total Domain Area requirements reduced by one.  Within the SI Domain, only non-lab SI courses are eligible for this reduction.  

Learning Outcomes

​Students will be able to:

  • Understand the major principles guiding modern scientific thought.
  • Demonstrate a mastery of the science content knowledge of their SID courses.
  • Know that science, technology, and math serve as mechanisms for inquiry into the nature of the universe:
      • Identify questions that can be answered through scientific investigations.
      • Design and conduct a scientific investigation to test a scientific hypothesis.
      • Use appropriate tools and techniques to gather, analyze, and interpret data to support or refute a scientific hypothesis.
      • Develop descriptions, explanations, predictions, and models using evidence.
      • Describe relationships between evidence and explanations using critical and logical thinking.
      • Recognize and analyze alternative explanations and predictions.
      • Communicate scientific procedures and explanations.
      • Use mathematics in all aspects of scientific inquiry.
  • Understand and appreciate the interrelationships among science, technology, and math:
      • Use technology and mathematics to identify a problem or design and solution to a problem.
      • Give examples of how science and technology inform and influence each other.
  • Understand and appreciate the role of science in society and in their lives:
      • Provide examples of how science and technology impact our lives, and how social needs and concerns impact our development of technology and scientific investigation.
      • Develop positive attitudes towards science, technology, and mathematics.
      • Establish an ongoing experiential/service-learning interest in science, technology, and mathematics.
  • Understand the nature of science, technology, and mathematics:
      • Provide examples of the abuse of science, including the representation of unfalsifiable claims as science and other forms of pseudoscience,
      • Explain the strengths and limits of scientific inquiry,
      • Explain the difference between evidence and inference, and the provisional nature of scientific explanations by providing examples of how our understanding of the workings of the world has changed in the past,
      • Explain the difference between probability and certainty.
      • Describe what is meant by uncertainty in the context of science, technology, and mathematics.

Courses

Below please find examples of courses previously offered for scientific inquiry credit. For information on current offerings, please consult Campus Connection.

Scientific Inquiry: Science as a Way of Knowing Courses

Biological Sciences

Environmental Science

Scientific Inquiry: Lab Courses

Anthropology

Art Media and Design

Biological Sciences

Chemistry

Computer Graphics and Animation

Digital Cinema

Environmental Science

Nursing

Physics

STEM Studies

Scientific Inquiry: Non-Lab Courses

Anthropology

Biological Sciences

Chemistry

Computer Science

E-Commerce Technology

Environmental Science

Geography

Human Computer Interaction

Information Technology

Interactive and Social Media

Mathematics

Physics

Psychology

School for New Learning

Sociology

STEM Studies

​Telecommunication and Data Systems