DePaul University Catalog > Course Descriptions > Courses by Subject

Courses by Subject

ACC 101
INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING I
(UGRD)

Introduction to Accounting I provides an introduction to financial accounting as the means of recording, storing and summarizing economic events of the business enterprise to meet external reporting needs. Emphasis is placed on the preparation and analysis of financial statements and other financial reports to the public based on the accounting equation, accrual accounting concepts, and data gathering techniques. Topics include corporate accounting for current and long term assets and current liabilities, and the corporate income statement.
MAT 130 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 102
INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING II
(UGRD)

Introduction to Accounting II, a companion and sequel course to Accounting 101, continues to explore basic accounting fundamentals and concepts. The course provides an introduction to managerial accounting and internal reporting. Topics include financial accounting for long-term liabilities, the components of stockholders equity, the statement of cash flows, financial statement analysis, budgeting and variance analysis, job costing for the service sector and cost analysis for decision-making.
A grade of C- or better in ACC 101 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 250
CAREER MANAGEMENT FOR ACCOUNTANTS
(UGRD)

This course is designed to explore and manage the professional expectations and career potential of an accountancy major. Students will participate in hands-on resume building activities, practice interviews and apply research and evaluation skills to execute job search and career management strategies. Students will learn about Career Center resources and internship opportunities as ways to prepare for successful job searches and to maximize their potential for long term professional growth.(2 quarter hours)
A grade of C- or better in ACC 102 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 303
COST & MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
(UGRD)

Managerial Accounting provides a thorough grounding in manufacturing accounting, cost allocation techniques, and the evaluation of management control systems. Students will examine manufacturing cost systems including job order costing, process costing, and activity-based costing. Tools for management control systems will be covered to enable the student to evaluate and compare various systems.
A grade of C- or better in ACC 102 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 304
FINANCIAL REPORTING I
(UGRD)

Financial Reporting I includes a study of U.S. and international accounting standards, the concepts of accounting and basic financial statements. Accounting for cash, receivables, inventories, depreciable assets and current liabilities will also be examined.
A grade of C- or better in ACC 102 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 305
FINANCIAL REPORTING II
(UGRD)

Financial Reporting II focuses on researching accounting issues, revenue recognition and financial statement analysis. The course also provides an understanding of complex issues such as accounting for investments, long term liabilities, derivatives, contributed capital, retained earnings and earnings per share.
A grade of C- or better in ACC 304 or ACC 307 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 306
FINANCIAL REPORTING III
(UGRD)

The third course in the financial accounting sequence, this course studies deferred taxes, pensions and other post-retirement benefits, leases, accounting changes and error analysis, statement of cashflows (advanced), and full disclosure, if time permits. Selected spreadsheet applications will be introduced through homework assignments.
A grade of C- or better in ACC 305 or ACC 309 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 307
FINANCIAL REPORTING I FOR FINANCE HONORS STUDENTS
(UGRD)

Financial Reporting I includes a study of U.S. and international accounting standards, the concepts of accounting and basic financial statements. Accounting for cash, receivables, inventories, depreciable assets and investments will also be examined. This course takes a user of financial statements, rather than a preparer of financial statements, point of view.
ACC 101, ACC 102 and status as a Finance Honors student are a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 308
ADVANCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
(UGRD)

Advanced Financial Accounting focuses on accounting for multi-corporate entities and acquisitions, accounting for state and local governments, accounting for non-profit organizations, foreign operations, partnership accounting, and segment reporting. Selected spreadsheet applications will be introduced through homework assignments.
A grade of C- or better in ACC 305 or ACC 309 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 309
FINANCIAL REPORTING II FOR FINANCE HONORS STUDENTS
(UGRD)

Financial Reporting II focuses on researching accounting issues, revenue recognition and financial statement analysis. The course also provides an understanding of complex issues such as accounting for investments, long term liabilities, derivatives, contributed capital, retained earnings and earnings per share.
ACC 307 and status as a Finance Honors student are a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 350
INFORMATION FOR DECISION MAKING
(UGRD)

Information for Decision-Making is typically the final course in the curriculum in Accountancy. It is the course in the program that most emphasizes research using the FASB Accounting Standards Codification and documenting research results. There is also a focus on written and oral communication as well as teamwork. More specifically, the course addresses the standard setting process in financial accounting as well as the role that the Securities and Exchange Commission fills in that process. In addition, current financial accounting topics are covered including revenue recognition, fair value measurement and disclosures, and earnings quality. The course also provides an introduction to International Financial Reporting Standards.
(A grade of C- or better in ACC 305 or ACC 309) and a grade of C- or better in ACC 380 are prerequisites for this class.

ACC 370
PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES & BUSINESS LAW
(UGRD)

This course covers the aspects of the legal environment of special concern to accounting practitioners, including: the ethical standards of accounting practice, legal liability of accountants, contract law, property law, tort law, commercial paper, the laws of agency, sales laws, banking, agency, partnerships, corporations, trusts and wills, suretyships, secured transactions, bankruptcy, employment law, securities regulation, antitrust, and public regulation and disclosure laws.
A grade of C- or better in ACC 102 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 372
AUDITING I
(UGRD)

Auditing I provides a conceptual introduction to the nature and value of financial statement audits. The course emphasizes the professional skepticism required of auditors in a changing ethical and legal environment including the Professional Ethics Rules and U.S. Securities laws. The course focuses on Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS) that address engagement planning and execution including systems of internal control, audit procedures, evidence, and reporting.
A grade of C- or better in ACC 305 or ACC 309 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 374
AUDITING II
(UGRD)

Auditing II is a sequel to Auditing I (ACC 372). Auditing II builds upon the understanding and application of the Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS) Standards of Fieldwork to both analyze and evaluate audit procedures chosen and evidence obtained regarding classes of transactions and account balances. The course highlights common tools and techniques for planning and conducting audits including the use of sampling and data analysis when performing tests of controls and substantive tests.
A grade of C- or better in ACC 372 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 375
FRAUD EXAMINATION AND FORENSIC AUDITING
(UGRD)

Fraud Examination and Forensic Accounting covers various aspects of fraud prevention and detection including the elements and costs of fraud, controls to prevent fraud, and methods of fraud detection. Guest speakers with expertise in fraud examination and forensic auditing play a significant role in this course including the presentation and use of an interactive, real-world fraud case.
A grade of C- or better in ACC 304 or ACC 307 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 376
INTERNAL AUDITING
(UGRD)

Internal Auditing introduces a risk-based, process, and controls-focused internal audit approach. Topics include International Standards for the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing, internal control, corporate governance, risk assessment, evidence, audit documentation, and fraud risks. The course highlights the use of systems-based audit techniques and sampling. Professional ethics and emerging issues in the profession are discussed.
A grade of C- or better in ACC 102 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 380
TAX TREATMENT OF INDIVIDUALS AND PROPERTY
(UGRD)

Tax Treatment of Individuals and Property covers the basic provisions of the Internal Revenue Code as they relate to the taxation of individuals. It focuses on concepts of gross income, exclusions, deductions, exemptions, and credits, as well as property transactions. It also includes tax research.
A grade of C- or better in ACC 304 or ACC 307 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 383
TAX TREATMENT OF CORPORATIONS AND PARTNERSHIPS
(UGRD)

Tax Treatment of Corporations and Partnerships is a continuation of Accounting 380. The course covers the tax aspects of corporations and partnerships, including formation, operations, and distributions, as well as specially taxed corporations, ethics in tax practice, and an introduction to estate and gift taxation.
A grade of C- or better in ACC 380 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 393
INTERNSHIP IN ACCOUNTANCY
(UGRD)

This course is designed for students who already have or will soon have a position in an accounting or accounting-related field. Internship in Accountancy provides students with academically supervised work experiences, improving linkages between classroom efforts and the business world. Students obtain valuable professional experience and begin the process of networking with area businesses and professionals.
A grade of C- or better in ACC 102 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 398
SPECIAL TOPICS
(UGRD)

Special Topics courses provide in-depth study of current issues in accountancy. Content and format of this course is variable. Subject matter will be indicated in class schedule.

ACC 399
INDEPENDENT STUDY
(UGRD)

Independent Study is available to students of demonstrated capability for intensive independent work in accountancy. (variable credit)

ACC 500
FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
(GRAD)

This introduction to financial accounting provides both a theoretical foundation and an opportunity to apply accounting logic in increasingly complex situations. The accounting model and information processing cycle are developed. The content of the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows are studied in detail and analyzed.
MS in Taxation and MSAA students are restricted from registering for this class.

ACC 505
LANGUAGE AND BUSINESS CULTURE
(GRAD)

The objective of this course is to develop an understanding of how to be successful in the U.S., both academically and professionally. The course covers the concepts, methods and tools necessary to face the challenges of studying and working in the U.S. Students will improve their skills in oral communication, practical business writing, and delivering presentations. Students will also gain knowledge of the career search process. Recommended to be taken concurrently with ACC 500.Prerequisite: Approval of college office or department

ACC 516
APPLIED STATISTICS FOR ACCOUNTANTS
(GRAD)

This course is a statistical overview of concepts taught in elementary and intermediate statistics classes but with more emphasis on understanding and interpretation of outcomes and findings. Report writing, article critiquing as well as team projects will be utilized. This course will cover general selected general statistics including basic sample descriptives, categorical data analysis including odds and risk ratios, estimation and hypothesis testing and basic regression and ANOVA technique. Logistic regression will also be covered. The course will emphasize data analytics and data projects.

ACC 535
PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS
(GRAD)

This course is designed to provide future accounting and business professionals with knowledge and practice about accounting information systems and their role in accounting functions and financial decision making. It will enable the student to interface with accounting systems, and to participate in their design and audit. It will focus on the nature and flows of accounting information in organizations, security and internal controls and the use of information technology in accounting information systems and decision-making. The student will be able to evaluate internal control in information systems and design controls to mitigate risks associated with information systems.
ACC 500 is a prerequisite for this course

ACC 541
FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING THEORY & PRACTICE I
(GRAD)

Intermediate theory and preparation of financial statements; review of accounting concepts and development of accounting models; methods and problems in valuation and reporting; with emphasis on current assets and liabilities, property, plant and equipment, and intangibles, review of relevant authoritative literature.
ACC 500 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 542
COST AND MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
(GRAD)

Introduction to cost and managerial concepts and techniques. Topics include cost accumulation (job, process, standard costing, and activity-based costing), cost behavior, breakeven analysis, budgeting, contribution approach to income measurement, joint and by-product costing, cost allocation methods, and their relevance for decision-making.
ACC 500 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 543
FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING THEORY & PRACTICE II
(GRAD)

Continuation of intermediate theory and financial statement preparation with emphasis on the components of stockholder's equity; special problems such as earnings per share, accounting changes, income taxes, derivatives, and statement of cash flows; review of relevant authoritative literature and interpretation of financial statements.
ACC 541 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 545
ADVANCED TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING THEORY
(GRAD)

This course is designed to provide comprehensive coverage of the following: consolidations, partnership accounting, foreign operations and not-for-profit accounting. Coverage of the topics emphasizes both theory and practice. Mastery of the material is obtained through problem-solving situations.
ACC 543 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 547
AUDITING I
(GRAD)

Auditing I provides a conceptual introduction to the nature and value of financial statement audits. The course emphasizes the professional skepticism required of auditors in a changing ethical and legal environment including the Professional Ethics Rules and U.S. Securities laws. The course focuses on Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS) that address engagement planning and execution including systems of internal control, audit procedures, evidence, and reporting.
ACC 500, or equivalent, is a prerequisite for this course

ACC 548
TAX TREATMENT OF INDIVIDUALS AND PROPERTY TRANSACTIONS
(GRAD)

This course provides detailed coverage of the federal income tax treatment of individual taxpayers. It includes coverage of inclusions, exclusions, deductions, credits, rates of taxation, special tax computations and the tax aspects of property transactions. It also includes tax research.
ACC 541 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 550
AUDITING II
(GRAD)

Auditing II is a sequel to Auditing I (ACC 547). Auditing II builds upon the understanding and application of the Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS) Standards of Fieldwork to both analyze and evaluate audit procedures chosen and evidence obtained regarding classes of transactions and account balances. The course highlights common tools and techniques for planning and conducting audits including the use of sampling and data analysis when performing tests of controls and substantive tests.
ACC 547 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 551
TAX TREATMENT OF CORPORATIONS AND PARTNERSHIPS
(GRAD)

This course covers the federal income tax treatment of corporations and partnerships. It includes ethics in tax practice and an exposure to estate and gift taxation.
ACC 548 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 552
BUSINESS LAW FOR ACCOUNTANTS
(GRAD)

This course covers the aspects of the legal environment of special concern to accounting practitioners, including: the ethical standards of accounting practice, legal liability of accountants, contract law, property law, tort law, commercial paper, the laws of agency, sales laws, banking, agency, partnerships, corporations, trusts and wills, suretyships, secured transactions, bankruptcy, employment law, securities regulation, antitrust, and public regulation and disclosure laws. Formerly "Legal and Ethical Environment of Accounting Practice".
Not Available to MST Students

ACC 554
MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING AND CONTROL
(GRAD)

This course provides students with a conceptual understanding of basic cost management and managerial accounting knowledge and skills. Topics include cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, cost accounting systems, budgeting and control, responsibility accounting, the basics of strategic performance measurement systems and analyzing performance. Emphasis is on the interpretation & use of accounting information rather than its creation & accumulation. (2 quarter hours)
ACC 500 is a prerequisite for this class. This class is not available for MSAA, MSACC or MST students.

ACC 555
MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING FOR DECISION-MAKING
(GRAD)

This course addresses the financial, nonfinancial & ethical dimensions of decision- making. It provides students with a conceptual understanding of cost management and managerial accounting skills. Topics include cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, cost systems, budgeting and control and decision-making. Emphasis is on the interpretation & use of accounting information rather than its creation & accumulation.
ACC 500 is a prerequisite for this class. This class is not available for MSAA, MSACC or MST students.

ACC 557
GLOBAL STRATEGIC FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
(GRAD)

This course concentrates on each student's own career goals by focusing on cases of well-known financial successes and failures in the global business world. It enables students to become intelligent users (readers) of financial reporting in a global environment. Students will learn to identify key relationships in the statements to strategy of high performance companies and to make critical judgments underlying the elements and valuations in the financial statements. Students will study integrated reporting, corporate governance, and sustainability accounting. The course is a useful elective for MSA, MACC and MBA programs.
ACC 500, or equivalent, is a prerequisite for this course

ACC 558
TAX RESEARCH
(GRAD)

Tax research methods are taught in the classroom. The course begins with a study of the history of the body of tax law. A "walk through" technique is employed to give the student firsthand experience in the use of a tax research service.
ACC 551 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 560
TAXATION OF CORPORATIONS AND SHAREHOLDERS
(GRAD)

Study of federal income taxation of corporations and shareholders with emphasis on transactions between the corporation and its shareholders. Topics include corporate formations, nonliquidating distributions to shareholders, stock redemptions, and corporate liquidations. NOTE: This is a M.S.T. course.
ACC 558 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 561
CORPORATE REORGANIZATIONS
(GRAD)

Federal income tax implications of transfers of stock, securities and property in connection with corporate acquisitions, combinations and separations. This course is mainly concerned with the tax consequences to corporate parties, to reorganizations and to their shareholders. Emphasis is given to determining the taxability of transactions and asserting the availability of tax attributes to successors in interest. NOTE: This is a M.S.T. course.
ACC 560 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 562
CONSOLIDATED RETURNS
(GRAD)

This course deals with the principles and mechanics of tax consolidations including eligibility, intercompany transactions, inventory adjustments, basis of subsidiary stock, limitations on net operating losses, earnings and profits, unified loss rule and circular basis. NOTE: This is a M.S.T. course.
ACC 560 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 563
PARTNERSHIPS
(GRAD)

An in-depth analysis of the federal income tax rules governing partners and partnerships. This course will take the student through the life cycle of a partnership that includes the formation of a partnership, allocation of operations, and liquidation. Some of the topics covered include the study of the aggregate and entity theories, application and importance of IRC 704(b) & 704(c), as well as the allocation of liabilities to partners. NOTE: This is a M.S.T. course.
ACC 551 and ACC 558 are prerequisites for this class.

ACC 564
TRANSACTIONS IN PROPERTY
(GRAD)

This course is concerned mainly with the federal income tax implications of gains and losses derived from sales and other dispositions of property. Emphasis will be given to the determination and recognition of gain or loss, character of gain or loss (capital or ordinary), basis and holding period. NOTE: This is a M.S.T. course.
ACC 551 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 565
TAX ACCOUNTING, PERIODS, AND METHODS
(GRAD)

This course deals with federal income tax planning as to determination of the proper periods for reporting income and deductions, overall methods of tax accounting and special elections available to taxpayers. Topics include the installment method, accounting method changes, accrual method, cash method, FIFO, LIFO and accounting periods. NOTE: This is a M.S.T. course.
ACC 551 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 566
FEDERAL INCOME TAX PROCEDURES
(GRAD)

A study of the procedures which must be followed when dealing with the Internal Revenue Service and possible alternative courses of action. Included are such topics as the organization of the Internal Revenue Service, filing requirements, refund claims, closing agreements, examination procedures, protests, assessment, payment and collection of tax, statute of limitations, interest and penalties. NOTE: This is a M.S.T. course.
ACC 551 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 567
INTERNATIONAL ASPECTS OF U.S. TAXATION
(GRAD)

This course covers the federal income taxation of United States persons investing or doing business outside the United States and nonresident aliens and foreign corporations having nexus with the United States. Topics covered include, among others, the conceptual framework for taxing US and non US persons on worldwide income, the US foreign tax credit mechanism, Subpart F income, controlled foreign corporations, sourcing rules and expense allocations and the application of the US double tax treaty network. NOTE: This is a M.S.T. course.
ACC 551 and ACC 558 are prerequisites for this class.

ACC 568
TAXATION OF CLOSELY HELD CORPORATIONS
(GRAD)

This course deals with federal income tax planning in connection with the accumulated earnings tax, personal holding companies, S corporations, multiple corporations, transactions between related parties and small business corporation stock. NOTE: This is a M.S.T. course.
ACC 558 and ACC 560 are prerequisites for this class.

ACC 569
CONCEPTS OF DEFERRED COMPENSATION
(GRAD)

The nature, purpose and operation of the various forms of deferred compensation are examined and evaluated: employee pension; profit sharing and stock bonus plans, stock options; executive compensation plans; retirement plans for self-employed individuals; other plans. NOTE: This is a M.S.T. course.
ACC 551 and ACC 558 are prerequisites for this class.

ACC 570
STATE AND LOCAL INCOME AND FRANCHISE TAXATION
(GRAD)

This course identifies and examines the types of income and capital stock taxes imposed on corporations and pass-through entities by state governments. Topics include nexus and the impact of P.L. 86-272, conformity to the Internal Revenue Code, modifications to federal taxable income, business and nonbusiness income, methods of reporting, and allocation and apportionment and current developments. NOTE: This is a M.S.T. course.
ACC 558 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 571
ESTATE AND GIFT TAXATION
(GRAD)

This course consists of a detailed review of the federal estate tax, gift tax and generation-skipping tax laws. In the area of estate taxation, assets included in the gross estate, deductions allowed, and credits permitted are analyzed under the relevant statutes, regulations and cases. The taxation of gifts, the application of gift tax deductions, and the application of gift tax exclusions are covered. The taxation of generation-skipping transfers and the GST exemption allocations rules are analyzed. Valuation issues are discussed at length. Illinois estate tax issues are reviewed in detail. Basis consistency rules are discussed. The basic rules under EGTERRA are briefly mentioned. NOTE: This is a M.S.T. course.
ACC 551 and ACC 558 are prerequisites for this class.

ACC 572
CONCEPTS OF STATE PROPERTY AND TRANSACTION TAXATION
(GRAD)

This course focuses on concepts of property and sales taxation, but will survey other state and local transaction taxes, including excise taxes, utility taxes, fuel taxes and escheat statutes. Property tax concepts include the fundamentals of the property tax process, distinctions between real and personal property valuation theory and approaches and practical means by which taxpayers can challenge their assessments and ensure fair taxation. NOTE: This is a M.S.T. course.

ACC 573
INCOME TAXATION OF ESTATES, TRUSTS AND DECEDENTS
(GRAD)

This course deals with federal income taxation of estates, trusts and decedents with special emphasis on such concepts as income in respect of a decedent and estate and trust distributions. Also, included are such topics as the income and deductions included in the decedent's final return, death of a partnership member, the income and deductions of estate and trusts, the throwback rule, grantor trusts and the tax ramifications of the use of other special trusts. NOTE: This is a M.S.T. course.
ACC 548 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 574
ESTATE PLANNING
(GRAD)

This course will deal primarily with how to avoid and minimize federal estate taxes and estate administration expenses upon the subsequent demise of the client. Therefore, the student must have taken the estate and gift taxation, the use of outright gifts, the use of trusts. Generation skipping transfers and charitable gifts will also be considered. NOTE: This is a M.S.T. course.
ACC 571 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 576
FEDERAL TAX VALUATION
(GRAD)

Fair market value is referenced hundreds of times in the Internal Revenue Code, and many more times in the Regulations. In the initial part of this course the procedures and methods applicable to tax valuation are reviewed to heighten practitioner awareness of the range of potential valuation methods, the appropriateness of their application, and the rationale behind the conclusions drawn. Tax cases are used extensively to achieve this objective. In the second part of the course presentations and discussions address more specific topics such as built-in gains, valuation aspects of charitable giving, conservation easements, ESOPs, family limited partnerships, reasonable compensation, S-corporations, special use properties, bankruptcy and transfer pricing. Note: This is a M.S.T. course.

ACC 580
ACCOUNTING FOR INCOME TAXES
(GRAD)

Covers the financial accounting and reporting standards for the effects of income taxes that result from corporate activities. Topics include computation of current and deferred tax expense or benefit, temporary differences, carry-forwards, computation of deferred tax assets and liabilities, valuation allowances, business combinations, investments in subsidiaries and equity method investments, presentation and disclosure, and implementation of accounting for uncertainty in income taxes under FIN 48.
ACC 551 or admission to the MST or MSAA programs are prerequisites for this course

ACC 581
TAXATION OF REAL ESTATE
(GRAD)

An in-depth study of federal income taxation as it relates to real estate, including current issues and planning possibilities. Topics include consequences of acquisition and disposition, real estate development, leasing, mortgages and other financing devices and forms of ownership of real estate. NOTE: This is a M.S.T. course.
ACC 563 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 582
ADVANCED CONCEPTS IN INTERNATIONAL TAXATION
(GRAD)

This advanced course is a companion offering to the introductory international taxation course (ACC 567). In this course, a deeper review of critical elements of cross border tax are examined, including the treatment of foreign currency gains and losses, the treatment of US outbound transactions under sections 367 (a), (b) and (d), transfer pricing and VAT as well as key income tax accounting matters under US GAAP. NOTE: This is a M.S.T. course.
ACC 567 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 590
WRITING FOR TAX PROFESSIONALS
(GRAD)

Writing for Tax Professionals focuses on developing skills to transform the results of tax research into a tax research memorandum and a client letter. This course provides a series of exercises that build skills in analyzing primary sources, applying rules and court holdings to fact patterns, and communicating this tax analysis into written documents. Throughout the course, you will write and receive feedback on your writing. The final assignment will incorporate the earlier writing exercises into a tax research memorandum and an accompanying client letter.

ACC 591
TAX EXEMPT ORGANIZATIONS
(GRAD)

Tax treatment of public charities and private foundations. The way exempt status is secured and retained, qualified exemptions, unrelated business income, the loss of exemption, prohibited transactions, deductibility of contributions and required reporting and auditing.
ACC 558 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 592
FEDERAL INCOME TAX OF INDIVIDUALS
(GRAD)

This course provides a comprehensive in depth study of the Federal income tax system as it applies to individual taxpayers. This course will focus on the components of gross income, adjustments to arrive at adjusted gross income, deductions and exemptions, tax rates and filing status, and tax credits that apply to individual taxpayers. This course will review the specific provisions of interest to employees, entrepreneurs, investors, and retirees.
ACC 548 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 593
OVERVIEW OF TRANSFER PLANNING FOR WEALTH MANAGEMENT
(GRAD)

This course introduces students to an overview of the transfer tax system from a financial planning perspective. The course will be divided into four areas of concentration: (1) transfer tax, (2) property law, (3) estate planning, and (4) insurance, charitable and retirement topics. The objective of the course is to analyze how each of the above areas of concentration impact the financial planning process.
Not Available to MST Students

ACC 594
FAMILY OFFICE AND MULTIGENERATIONAL PLANNING
(GRAD)

This course will involve a survey of the planning and structuring issues that high net worth families address when managing wealth for multiple generations. The course will be facilitated by one or two instructors who will direct eight different expert guest lecturers in the wealth management field. The topics include: introduction and review of federal wealth transfer tax concepts; generation-skipping transfer tax and structuring dynastic entities; charitable gifts and foundations utilized in large families; management and dispositions of family business and closely held entities; asset protection planning: domestic and international; international estate planning: offshore trusts and entities; creating and administering a family office; family governance, wealth education and private trust companies.
ACC 592 and ACC 593 are prerequisites for this class.

ACC 598
SEMINAR ON CURRENT PROBLEMS IN TAXATION
(GRAD)

Covers recent significant developments in the future of legislation, regulations, administrative rulings and case law on federal income, estate and gift taxation. Emphasis is placed on specific tax planning in light of these current developments. Topics are discussed against background of leading Supreme Court cases. Recommended as final tax course in M.S.T. program.
ACC 560, ACC 565 and ACC 566 and completion of 32 units of credit are prerequisites for this class.

ACC 615
APPLIED STATISTICS FOR ACCOUNTANTS
(GRAD)

This course is a statistical overview of concepts taught in elementary and intermediate statistics classes but with more emphasis on understanding and interpretation of outcomes and findings. Report writing, article critiquing as well as team projects will be utilized. This course will cover general selected general statistics including basic sample descriptives, categorical data analysis including odds and risk ratios, estimation and hypothesis testing and basic regression and ANOVA technique. Logistic regression will also be covered. The course will emphasize data analytics and data projects.

ACC 635
PRINCIPLES OF FORENSIC ACCOUNTING
(GRAD)

This course will focus on fraud principles that relate to asset misappropriations, corruption and fraudulent financial statements. Emphasis will be on examination, review, and analysis of a variety of fraud schemes, including discussion of investigative strategies and controls used to detect and prevent the impact fraud has on an organization.

ACC 636
INTERNAL AUDITING, CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND INTERNAL CONTROL
(GRAD)

This course addresses the overall role that internal audit plays as a critical part of an organization's control and governance structure. The content of the course includes a case that incorporates the complete internal audit process for a hypothetical company, including identification of risk, planning, execution of fieldwork and reporting using TeamMate software. This course covers the strategic role and operations of an internal audit function from three key perspectives; the Chief Audit Executive, who is responsible for the functions, the chair of the audit committee, who oversees the function, and the CEO or CFO who is responsible for the function within the organization.
ACC 500 is a prerequisite for this class.

ACC 637
DATA MINING AND ANALYTICS
(GRAD)

This course introduces students to the field of data mining and data analytics, which has been defined as the extensive use of data, statistical and quantitative analysis, and exploratory and predictive models to drive decisions and actions. With an emphasis on hands-on problem solving capabilities, this course further develops students' analytics mindset and data-driven decision skills.
ACC 535 and ACC 615 are prerequisites for this course.

ACC 638
ADVANCED IT AUDITING
(GRAD)

This course prepares students to understand and assess the sources IT risks and conduct IT audits by examining the key principles behind the auditing of IT processes. The course has a focus on gaining hands-on experience in analyzing and assessing IT risks and controls. The effective management of Information Technology (IT) assets in order to meet business objectives and of IT-related business risks is of critical importance to organizations today. The application of the COBIT framework and other professional IT audit standards is emphasized.
ACC 500 is a prerequisite for this course

ACC 639
AUDIT ANALYTICS
(GRAD)

The course will familiarize students with basic audit analytics knowledge, skills and tools, and expose students to real world audit analytics related issues and potential solutions. With an emphasis on hands-on problem solving capabilities, this course attempts to develop students' analytics mindset in the context of auditing by using CaseWare IDEA.
ACC 535 and ACC 615 are prerequisites for this course.

ACC 640
ACCOUNTING THEORY AND POLICY FORMULATION
(GRAD)

A study of the process by which accounting policies are formulated. The students are asked to make critical evaluations of basic issues such as income determination and current issues such as FASB agenda items in light of their theoretical, empirical, practical and political aspects. Students are expected to demonstrate an ability to use the accounting research literature. Students should plan to take this capstone course at the end of their degree program. This course is intended to be taken toward the end of the MSA program.
ACC 545 and ACC 550, or MSAA status are prerequisites for this class.

ACC 645
FORENSIC AND INVESTIGATIVE ACCOUNTING
(GRAD)

This course focuses the human element of accounting-based fraud. The course covers interpersonal skills such as the psychology of those who commit crimes, reading people and places, handwriting analysis, and discourse analysis. It also includes technical skills such as net worth analysis, expert witnessing, and the writing of expert reports. The course is delivered using hands-on experience in a case-based setting.
ACC 635 is a prerequisite for this course.

ACC 646
FORENSIC ACCOUNTING AND VALUATION
(GRAD)

This course focuses on financial statement fraud. Skills taught in this course include using financial statement analysis to detect fraud in financial statements, and valuation skills that can be used to value both public and private firms in cases of shareholder and partnership disputes, divorce cases etc. Students are given a chance to use these skills to detect and investigate fraud within a company's financial statements.
ACC 635 is a prerequisite for this course.

ACC 690
GRADUATE INTERNSHIP
(GRAD)

Technical knowledge acquired in the classroom is applied in an actual business environment through varied assignments under supervision in industry, government or public accounting. Offered variably.

ACC 798
SPECIAL TOPICS
(GRAD)

Content and format of this course are variable. An in-depth study of current issues in accountancy. Subject matter will be indicated in class schedule. Offered variably.

ACC 799
INDEPENDENT STUDY
(GRAD)

Available for graduate students of demonstrated capability for intensive independent work in accountancy.

A&S 491
EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP OF SCHOOLS
(GRAD)

This course introduces students to the research base of organizational theory, the politics of education, and foundations of building level instructional leadership. Multiple theories are examined in light of the students' experience in educational settings. This examination of theory in light of experience provides the students with a framework for analyzing both familiar educational institutions and the theories that support educational institutions. Through a study of administrative and organizational theory using those settings with which students are most familiar, students will become more reflective of the theoretical base that will inform their future practice as administrators.
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student or a Principal or Catholic School Principal (Licensure) student is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 492
THE PRINCIPALSHIP
(GRAD)

This course provides students with the tools needed to enter into a Pre-K-12 school setting and function effectively. Topics included in this course include: scheduling; managing resources; technology; issues of working with students and teachers; maintaining a safe and effective learning environment.
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student or a Principal or Catholic School Principal (Licensure) student is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 493
DATA DRIVEN DECISION MAKING
(GRAD)

This course provides future administrators with the tools they need to critically examine demographic, financial, personnel and testing data and to use the insights gained in making well informed administrative decisions.
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student or a Principal or Catholic School Principal (Licensure) student is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 494
SCHOOL FINANCE
(GRAD)

Major consideration will be given to problems relating to the preparing of a school budget, procuring revenue, financial accounting, capital outlays, insurance on property, taking of inventory, and the social and political implications of how schools are financed.
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student or a Principal or Catholic School Principal (Licensure) student is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 495
SCHOOL LAW
(GRAD)

Authority, powers and liability of school personnel; rights and status of students; character of districts and school board control of curriculum, school property, finances. Special emphasis on recent state and federal court decisions as they affect Illinois and neighboring states.
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student or a Principal or Catholic School Principal (Licensure) student is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 496
STAKEHOLDER RELATIONSHIPS
(GRAD)

This course draws on the literature about constructive conflict resolution and partnership building to address the important, inevitable, and sometimes stormy relationships among various education stakeholders both inside and outside of the school building. Educational administrators cannot fire tenured teachers, angry parents, or zealous community organizers. Thus, they must learn the paradigms and tools to not only resolve the inevitable conflicts that arise with these stakeholders but also to be able to work with them as key strategic partners.
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student or a Principal or Catholic School Principal (Licensure) student is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 498
INSTRUCTIONAL SUPERVISION AND SUPPORT
(GRAD)

Instructional Supervision is examined from the perspective of both student and teacher learning, dealing with issues such as motivation, responsibility and increased proficiency. This course deals with issues of teacher observation and evaluation; clinical supervision; and professional development programming.
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student or a Principal or Catholic School Principal (Licensure) student is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 499
PLANNING FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
(GRAD)

This course introduces students to the dynamics of adult learning and how to apply these learning theories to the development of meaningful professional development for teachers and adult staff that enhances student success. Goals: (1) Developing skills and developing a comprehensive plan for professional development, (2) Addressing the challenges of adult learners, (3) Developing mentoring and coaching skills, (4) Developing and understanding the importance of assessment and reflection.

A&S 570
HISTORICAL, PHILOSOPHICAL AND THEOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF CATHOLIC SCHOOL LEADERSHIP
(GRAD)

A survey of the history of Catholic K-12 education in the United States and the foundational documents of Catholic Education. Students will examine the history and philosophical/theological foundation of Catholic Schools in the United States and will be asked to reflect on the nature and mission of Catholic education in the multicultural, multiethnic milieu of Twenty-first Century America.
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student or a Principal or Catholic School Principal (Licensure) student is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 571
SPIRITUAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE LEADERSHIP IN CATHOLIC SCHOOLS
(GRAD)

Students will be asked to conceptualize leadership from the Transformational and Servant Leadership perspectives. Using these principles, students will examine the spirituality of Catholic School leadership, and its implications for them in their role as ministers and coordinators of ministries in the school setting. Students will then examine the unique administrative and managerial factors that impact Catholic schools from a leadership framework that is imbued with the spirituality of Servant Leadership.
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student or a Principal or Catholic School Principal (Licensure) student is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 588
SERVICE LEARNING FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
(GRAD)

This class is a hands-on, minds-on engagement in the practice and theory of service learning - the integration of community service and related academic study. Students will assist a service-learning program with planning, implementation or evaluation and integrate this experience with study of current practice, theory and research. Students who plan careers in higher education will find this useful in light of the increased commitment to providing service-learning opportunities on campuses. Many student services and other higher education positions include the need to offer leadership to these programs.

A&S 590
ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
(GRAD)

A development approach used in combining theory, research, and applications for improving interpersonal effectiveness and to develop problem-solving capacity of the organization. The course is about change theory, people in organizations and the achievement of individual and organizational goals.
Status as a student in a College of Education Advanced Master's program is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 591
RESEARCH SEMINAR IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP
(GRAD)

This course is designed to help graduate students in Educational Leadership through the process of planning, organizing, drafting, and revising their Master's papers. Students will be expected to complete a literature review and to develop a strong proposal for an integrative paper as a prelude to selecting an advisor for their Master's papers.
Status as a student in a College of Education Advanced Master's program is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 593
PRACTICUM IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP
(GRAD)

The practicum provides opportunities for advanced students in administration and supervision to participate in and complete a research project in selected systems on a full-time or part-time basis. The experiences are intended to provide, under professional direction and supervision for (1) study for major factions, policies, and problems for administration and supervision, and (2) intensive study of certain critical administrative and supervisory practices.
Status as a student in a College of Education Advanced Master's program is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 594
INTERNSHIP IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP
(GRAD)

The internship provides supervised experiences in selected organizations on a full-time or part-time basis. The student intern is cooperatively assigned to an organization under the immediate supervision of organizational personnel. The experiences provided are designed to enrich the student's theoretical background with practical opportunities of participating in (1) overall contact with personnel and with the major functions and problems of certain critical administrative and/or supervisory activities, and (2) a detailed study and analysis of a particular administrative and/or supervisory function or activity.
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student or a Principal or Catholic School Principal (Licensure) student is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 595
WORKSHOP IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP
(GRAD)

Topics of particular interest and concern to administrators and supervisors will be presented in a high-involvement seminar format. Primary reliance will be on written materials; however, audio-visual and role-playing mechanisms may also be used.
Status as a student in a College of Education Advanced Master's program is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 596
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
(GRAD)

Theory, practice and relevant research in modern personnel administration. Recruitment, staff-development, interviewing, collective bargaining, conflict resolution and employee evaluation are emphasized. Human resource administration, induction programs, and in-service opportunities are touched upon.
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student or a Principal or Catholic School Principal (Licensure) student is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 597
POLITICS OF EDUCATION
(GRAD)

Policy development in education as a political process; community power, state and national politics in educational decision-making and the role of leadership and pressure groups in the shaping of educational policy at local, state and national levels.
Status as a student in a College of Education Advanced Master's program is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 598
INDEPENDENT STUDY IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP
(GRAD)

Independent study: Permission of instructor, department chair and Associate Dean are required.
Status as a student in a College of Education Advanced Master's program is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 599
THESIS SEMINAR IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP
(GRAD)

A student writing a thesis registers for this course for four quarter hours of credit. When the thesis research and the writing of the thesis itself are prolonged beyond the usual time, the program advisor may require the student to register for additional credit.
SCG 410, an approved thesis and status as an Advanced Master's student is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 600
REGISTERED STUDENT IN GOOD STANDING
(GRAD)

Registration in this course is open to students who are not registered for any other courses but need to complete requirements/assignments for previously taken courses. It provides access to University facilities. Permission of advisor required (0 credit hours).
Status as a student in a College of Education Advanced Master's program is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 601
INTRODUCTION TO THE INTERNSHIP
(GRAD)

This course prepares the candidate for the internship experience. It provides an opportunity to examine and analyze the internship site, become familiar with the roles and responsibilities for person in the internship triad and understand expectations for the intern.

A&S 602
PRINCIPAL LICENSURE INTERNSHIP I
(GRAD)

This internship experience immerses the student into the world of the instructional leader in the contemporary Pre K- 8th school setting. The student is to complete at minimum 100 clock hours of instructional leadership experiences in The PreK-8 setting by participating and taking the lead in concrete sustained leadership experiences under the supervision of both the building's principal (mentor) and the faculty supervisor (2 credit hours).
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student or a Principal or Catholic School Principal (Licensure) student is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 603
PRINCIPAL LICENSURE INTERNSHIP II
(GRAD)

This internship experience immerses the student into the world of the instructional leader in the contemporary 9 -12 school setting. The student is to complete at minimum 100 clock hours of instructional leadership experiences in the 9-12 setting by participating and taking the lead in concrete sustained leadership experiences under the supervision of both the building's principal (mentor) and the faculty supervisor. (2 credit hours)
Status as an Advanced Masters Education student or a Principal or Catholic School Principal (Licensure) student is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 606
REVIEW OF LITERATURE
(GRAD)

This paper will give students the opportunity to develop and demonstrate written competence in a subfield of their disciplines and to enhance life-long learning. Specifically, they will broaden their knowledge base and inform themselves about a topic, issue, theory, etc., by reviewing and synthesizing existing literature. To do so, students will need a variety of bibliographic skills including searching databases. In other words, students will need to be able to ask and answer such questions as "What is known about? What are major issues and themes?" (0 credit hours)

A&S 607
INTEGRATIVE PAPER
(GRAD)

Students will observe and/or participate in the reciprocal interaction of theory and practice, by investigating actual practice in the field as it relates to theory. This might take the form of investigating how a particular theory is applied in the field, developing a practical application of a theory, or, conversely, developing/refining a theory based on investigations made in the field. In other words, as graduates encounter new theories and practices they will need to be able to investigate and evaluate them, asking and answering questions about "how theories work." (0 credit hours)

A&S 608
CAPSTONE IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP
(GRAD)

Students who have completed the majority of the program will engage in an analysis of an urban school. Students will be given demographic, financial and testing data; a narrative of the school's history and recent past; photographs of the setting, and other pertinent data and artifacts. Using these artifacts, students will be asked to design their first year agenda as the chief administrator in the building. Using the ISLLC standards as a guideline, students will create a portfolio that clearly outlines, schedules, professional development plans, budgets, enrollment projections, and so forth.

A&S 625
CANDIDACY CULMINATING PROJECT
(GRAD)

(0 credit) Registration in this course is required of all students who are not enrolled in a course but are completing culminating projects for their program of study, including theses, papers, and final portfolios. It provides access to university facilities. Permission of advisor required. Registration limited to three terms.
Status as a student in a College of Education Advanced Master's program is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 640
LEGAL ASPECTS OF SPECIAL EDUCATION FOR CLASSROOM TEACHERS
(GRAD)

The course will include a discussion of the legal rights of students with disabilities and the corresponding responsibilities and obligations of schools and educational personnel for meeting their educational needs. The course will include specific legal components inherent with the identification and education of students with disabilities including adaptations of classroom instructional methodology for students with disabilities in the regular education classroom.

A&S 645
THE ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION OF SPECIAL EDUCATION
(GRAD)

This course will examine the role and function of special education; special services within the school and community, including special classes for the mentally and/or physically handicapped; and various services, such as school psychology, school social work, speech correction, learning disabilities specialist, and others. The course includes specific models for administration of special education programs and procedures for supervision and evaluation of special education personnel.

A&S 688
SERVICE LEARNING FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
(GRAD)

This class is a hands-on, minds-on engagement in the practice and theory of service learning - the integration of community service and related academic study. Students will assist a service-learning program with planning, implementation or evaluation and integrate this experience with study of current practice, theory and research. Students who plan careers in higher education will find this useful in light of the increased commitment to providing service-learning opportunities on campuses. Many student services and other higher education positions include the need to offer leadership to these programs.

A&S 694
SCHOOL FINANCE
(GRAD)

Major consideration will be given to problems relating to the preparation of a school budget, procuring revenue, financial accounting, capital outlays, insurance on property, taking of inventory, and the social, political, and ethical implications of how schools are financed.
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 695
SCHOOL LAW
(GRAD)

Authority, powers and liability of school personnel; rights and status of students; character of districts and school board control of curriculum, school property, finances. Special emphasis on recent state and federal court decisions as they affect Illinois and neighboring states.
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 700
REGISTERED DOCTORAL STUDENT IN GOOD STANDING
(GRAD)

Non-credit. This registration is required of all doctoral students who are not enrolled in a doctoral course, but are completing course requirements and/or dissertation research. It provides access to University facilities. Academic advisor approval required. After the third enrollment, dissertation chair approval required. (0 credit hours)
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 706
CANDIDACY PAPER
(GRAD)

(0 credit) Registration in this course is required of all students who are not enrolled in a course but are completing a dissertation. It provides access to university facilities. Permission of advisor required. This registration indicates that a student has successfully completed the candidacy paper as specified in the Doctoral Student Handbook. (0 credit hours)
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 801
LEADERSHIP: THEORY AND PRACTICE
(GRAD)

This course examines leadership theories from various social, psychological and philosophical perspectives both historical and contemporary. The student will also be called upon to reflect upon contemporary practice in K -16 educational leadership settings and evaluate the efficacy of the theoretical frameworks in light of practice.
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 803
SCHOOL PROGRAMS, PLANT AND HUMAN RESOURCES
(GRAD)

The development of school programs, based on current research and school laws and regulations, will be explored. The focus will be on the core curriculum, Education and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), State Chapter I, Bilingual and Special Education mandates and opportunities as well as on other discretionary school programs. Responsibilities in relation to plant operation and management, staffing formulas for all staff, developing job descriptions, recruitment, and staff selection and evaluation are included.
Status as an EDD-Educational Leadership student is a prerequisite for this class. Other EDD students may enroll with permission of instructor.

A&S 811
ASSESSMENT AND ACCOUNTABILITY
(GRAD)

This course addresses the key role of leaders in educational systems for the development, articulation, implementation, and supervision of an assessment process that provides accountability for all stakeholders-students, parents, teachers, legislators, relevant communities, and governing authorities. Issues of philosophy, standards, outcomes, curricula, instrumentation, technology, and the interconnected nature of these factors are identified as they influence the leadership role in accountability compliance. Factors related to ethical practice and social justice anchor the philosophical and political parameters of the course.
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 823
COMMUNITY AND CONSENSUS BUILDING FOR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT
(GRAD)

Students will examine inclusive models for consensus building among school/community members that engage membership in processes and decision making through data collection, self-analysis, mission/vision development, goal setting and program planning, implementation and evaluation that leads to school and community improvement. Attention will be given to establishing linkages with local municipal, state, and federal resources, business and industrial resources, community services, and other community resources.
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 843
THE POLITICS OF SCHOOLING
(GRAD)

Students will engage in analyzing educational policy and the political processes related to problem identification, problem solving, decision making, the underlying political processes and their impact on the school/community, students, parents, educators, staff, and community members. The role of such entities as, school boards, unions, professional associations, businesses, university preparation programs, book and test publishers, and local, state, and national policy makers in the education political arena will be analyzed. Attention will be given to the means by which support for change is developed with special emphasis on collaborative dialogue and teamwork for political action. Strategies for coalition building, and individual and collective action will be informed by the use of theory from applied behavioral science and political science.
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 849
SUPERVISED DISSERTATION PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT
(GRAD)

Students register for this course for the quarter in which they defend their dissertation proposals. Permission of dissertation chair required.

A&S 859
INDEPENDENT DISSERTATION RESEARCH: EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP
(GRAD)

Students register for this course for the quarter in which they defend their dissertation. Permission of dissertation chair required.

A&S 873
CURRENT TRENDS IN BUDGETING AND FINANCE
(GRAD)

This course focuses on the priorities of school funding. Financial decisions undergird instructional programs and administrative decision making. Relating these to available money and funding, setting priorities and maximizing the impact on student achievement will be studied.
A&S 494 or equivalent and status as an EDD student are a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 883
SCHOOL LAW
(GRAD)

This course examines the current legal requirements of schools and how changes impact schools. Administrators make decisions that respond to many realities, including the rules and regulations at the local, state, and national levels. The administrator works within a constantly changing system. The duties and liabilities of school administrators as determined by federal rules and regulations, state school codes, the policies of boards of education, and case law will be examined.
A&S 495 and status as an EDD student are prerequisites for this course.

A&S 894
INTERNSHIP IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP
(GRAD)

(4-8 qh) The internship provides supervised experiences in selected organizations on a full-time or part-time basis. The student intern is cooperatively assigned to an organization under the immediate supervision of organizational personnel. The experiences provided are designed to enrich the student's theoretical background with practical opportunities of participating in (1) overall contact with personnel and with the major functions and problems of certain critical administrative and/or supervisory activities, and (2) a detailed study and analysis of a particular administrative and/or supervisory function or activity.
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

A&S 899
SUPERINTENDENT INTERNSHIP
(GRAD)

This course is intended for those seeking the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) Superintendent Endorsement. The experiences provided are designed to enrich the students' theoretical background with practical opportunities to participate in major functions and critical duties at the district, regional and/or central office level. The student will be cooperatively assigned to site(s) and be supervised by the on-site superintendent and a DePaul faculty member.
Status as a EDD student with a declared concentration is a prerequisite for this class.

ABD 100
INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN AND BLACK DIASPORA STUDIES
(UGRD)

This interdisciplinary introductory course examines the many ways in which African and diasporic peoples have created robust lives for themselves and contributed to the creation of the modern world. Our investigation will pay special attention to how social, economic, and political institutions, geographical factors, and the cultural forces of modernity have influenced African contributions to the modern world.

ABD 144
AFRICAN RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE
(UGRD)

A survey of the varieties of African religious practice and thought.

ABD 200
AFRICA: PEOPLES, CULTURES, IDEAS AND MOVEMENTS
(UGRD)

This is an introductory survey course on African politics. The organizing topic and focus of the course will be Africa's experience with democratic governance, especially its continuing vigor and popular appeal on the continent despite its elusive character. Our goal in this course is to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of Africa: its rich political tradition, incredible diversity, its contradictions, achievements and failings. The objective is to be able to ask better questions, and develop some insights about why democracy, self-sustaining economic growth, equity and social justice have been so difficult to accomplish and sustain in the region.

ABD 202
AFRICA, 1750-1900
(UGRD)

The Age of Conquest. The origins of Afro-European relations and the political, economic and military causes of the European partition and occupation of the continent. Cross-listed with HST 132.

ABD 203
AFRICA, 1900-PRESENT
(UGRD)

The workings of the colonial system, the rise and course of independence movements, and the history of individual African states since independence. Cross-listed with HST 133.

ABD 206
AFRO-CARIBBEAN AND AFRO-LATIN AMERICA: PEOPLES, CULTURES, IDEAS AND MOVEMENTS
(UGRD)

This course introduces students to the study of peoples of African descent in the Caribbean and Latin America through lenses of history, politics, and culture. Students will learn how racial identities are constructed and interpreted in the Americas and the ways these identities have shaped Latin American and Caribbean cultures, politics, and societies. This course will explore broad patterns, changes, and continuities in the history of the African Diaspora in the hemisphere through an analysis of various topics such as conquest, colonization, slavery, independence struggles, nation-building, imperialism, neo-colonialism, revolution, violence, social movements, and inter-American relations.

ABD 208
AFRICAN AMERICA: PEOPLES, CULTURES, IDEAS AND MOVEMENTS
(UGRD)

This course is intended to acquaint the student with a range of texts that illustrate some of the major themes in African American studies while emphasizing the development of students' critical reading, writing, and analytical skills. The course will serve as an introduction to African American historical, literary, political, and cultural study. This course is meant to introduce students to some of the issues, debates, and questions that have shaped the study and development of Black Americans in the United States and the broader world.

ABD 209
RACE AND RACISM
(UGRD)

Although it is common for us to talk about race, very few of us have an understanding of what the term means, much less how it came to signify human diversity. Race is not an objective scientific category that reliably conveys information about people or groups of people; it is a set of ideologies and practices that originated in modern Europe and has a traceable intellectual history. In this course we will study the origin of race as an intellectual and scientific project designed to organize humanity into discrete and hierarchical groups, and the implications of racial thinking, i.e. racial discrimination perpetuated by rhetorical and pictorial stereotypes, discriminatory behavior and institutional practices. We will utilize racial formation theory which links race and racism by showing the dynamic connections between stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination and privilege.

ABD 210
AFRICA ON FILM
(UGRD)

Africa is a continent with a rich and growing repertoire of film. This course explores this repertoire, focusing primarily on films made about Africa by filmmakers of African descent. This class will feature fiction and non-fiction films (full-length and shorts) by well-known filmmakers of African descent. In addition to screenings, students will read essays that illuminate the background necessary to intelligently interpret and critique film. Topics for discussion include the funding, distribution, and presentation of African Films as well as modes of criticism appropriate to film made by Africans and the relation of filmmaking to history. Film directors include Souleymane Cisse, Bassek ba Kobhio, Jean-Marie Teno, Djibril Dio Mambety, Mohamad Camara, and Ousmane Sembene.

ABD 211
AFRICA TO 1800: AGE OF EMPIRES
(UGRD)

A study of African history from earliest times, concentrating on the political, social and religious aspects of major African states and empires. Cross-listed with HST 131.

ABD 214
ARCHEOLOGY OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA
(UGRD)

Africans have been on the move since the dawn of humanity. Archaeology is one discipline that can inform us about the presence and influence of Africans throughout the world, beginning with our hominid ancestors and continuing through the 20th century. Prior experience with archaeology is not required. Topics include: the evolution and development of our species; migrations within the African continent and abroad; and the cultural insights to be gained from the rapidly-growing field of African-American archaeology.

ABD 215
THE AFRICAN AMERICAN RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE
(UGRD)

This course will examine the religious experience of African Americans and its African precursors through historical and literary resources, reflecting African Americans' distinctive past and interaction with other elements of American culture. Cross-listed with REL 115.

ABD 218
AFRICAN AMERICAN POLITICS
(UGRD)

This course explores the evolution of African-American political participation from the mid-1800's to the present. Topical areas include black political leadership and involvement in social movements (including abolitionism, nationalism, civil rights and the black power movements), electoral politics, political parties, urban politics, public policies, political culture, and as elected officials. Special attention will also be given to the influence of laws and the courts on African-Americans' political participation.

ABD 220
BLACKS AND LOVE
(UGRD)

This course employs cultural criticism, race and ethnic studies, and women's and gender studies to examine the visual representations of blacks and love in art, film, and literature. The course begins by examining the construction of race in eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth-century European and American philosophy and body politic and with an examination of art, art history, film, and literature. Section two explores the definition of love; it examines Christian definitions of love as well as secular definitions from black intellectuals, cultural critics, and scholars. Section three examines a range of genres in search of progressive, transformative, positive images that depict blacks in loving relationships, rediscovering what it means to love oneself and others in spite of/because of our human differences (in race/ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality).

ABD 221
ROMANCE, GENDER, AND RACE
(UGRD)

This course examines how writers represent gender and race in the romance genre. The course begins with a study of the literary elements that comprise popular romance novels. It also examines the design elements for their covers used primarily to attract women readers from varied racial/ethnic backgrounds, who, as major consumers of this genre, generate over a billion dollars in revenue annually. Next, attention will be devoted specifically to examining women writers and black readers of romance novels, who make up 25% of the billion dollar publishing industry. Questions to be addressed include: How does a writer's gender and racial/ethnic identity shape the representations of race and gender in romance fiction and cover design? How have writers complicated the popular romance plot to address the issues of gender, race, class, and age? How do writers utilize the romance novel during specific historical periods to address social, political, and health issues? The course concludes by examining how the internet has transformed the writing, publishing, purchasing, and reading practices for the writers, publishers, and readers of romance novels with black characters.

ABD 230
STEREOTYPES AND BLACK IDENTITY
(UGRD)

Stereotypical representations of people of African descent have pervaded Western culture throughout the modern era. These images were disseminated along the trade routes of colonialism, from Africa to Europe, the Americas and Asia. Stereotypes of people of African descent have been a part of popular culture, commercial advertising, and scientific literature. This course will examine the origin and dissemination of the dehumanized image of "the Black body". We will discuss the perpetuation of Black stereotypes and how these images have shaped Black identity in the post colonial world.

ABD 231
PHILOSOPHY AND THE QUESTION OF RACE
(UGRD)

A philosophical inquiry into the history of the concept of race. Cross-listed with PHL 231.

ABD 232
MIXED RACE AMERICAN IDENTITY
(UGRD)

The 1967 Supreme Court decision in the case of Loving vs. the State of Virginia overturned laws that prohibited individuals from different racial backgrounds from marrying. Since then, people from mixed racial and ethnic backgrounds have advocated for legal recognition of their status as members of more than one racial group. This course explores the transformation of these "interracial intimacies" from a cultural taboo to a source of personal identity. By placing their lives and experiences in the appropriate historical and cultural context, we will explore how people who identify as "mixed" negotiate the rigid boundaries of race in the United States.

ABD 233
SURVEY OF AFRICAN DIASPORIC INTELLECTUAL THOUGHT
(UGRD)

This survey course examines the philosophical and critical thought from African American, Caribbean, and African philosophers, feminists, political, and radical intellectuals. The thinkers to be studied include, but are not limited to, Du Bois, Garvey, James, Lamming, Williams, Senghor, Fanon, Hodge, Wynter, Lorde, Soyinka, hooks, Emecheta, and Conde. Cross-listed with REL 218.

ABD 234
SURVEY OF BLACK AESTHETIC THOUGHT
(UGRD)

This survey course examines the history of the aesthetic thought that has emerged from the minds of Black creative intellectuals in the United States and globally. Figures to be examined might include: Du Bois, Locke, Hughes, Johnson, Hurston, James, Baraka, Piper, hooks, Julien, Mercer, and Wallace.

ABD 235
HARLEM RENAISSANCE AND NEGRITUDE
(UGRD)

This interdisciplinary course will examine the diasporic literary and cultural movements known as the Harlem (or New Negro) Renaissance and the Negritude Movement. Through close attention to the essays, novels, and poetry from these movements, students will explore the connections between these two multifaceted cultural movements and their contributions to the growth of a global Black political and cultural consciousness. Authors to be studied include: Du Bois, Hughes, Locke, McKay, Cesaire and Senghor, among others.

ABD 239
PHILOSOPHIES OF AFRICA
(UGRD)

A study of the patterns of philosophical thinking from the African continent. Cross-listed with PHL 239.

ABD 240
BLACK MUSIC IN AMERICAN CULTURE
(UGRD)

This course will focus on the historical development, cultural significance, political commentary, and social effects of Black music in the U.S. from the 1960s to the 1980s. Beginning with the rise of R&B and Soul in the 1960s, the course will continue on to examine innovations such as funk, disco and the emergence of hip hop. It considers the aesthetics and themes of black music and how they reflect the Black experience in the U.S. during the latter half of the 20th century, as well as the ways that the music, the themes, and the people evolve over that period.

ABD 241
RELIGIOUS DIMENSIONS OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA
(UGRD)

This course explores the dynamics of African religions throughout the Diaspora and the Atlantic world. It will pay particular attention to the variety of historical experiences and sacred institutions of those of African descent. Questions of the course include: how were these religions and their communities created?; how have they survived?; and how are African-based traditions perpetuated through ritual, song, dance, drumming, and healing practices? Specific attention will be given to one or more of the following: Yoruba religion and its New World offspring, Santeria, Voodoo and Candomble; Africanisms in American religion; gospel music; Islam; urban religions; and/or Vodun and Voodoo.

ABD 244
AFRICAN WOMEN WRITERS
(UGRD)

This course examines fiction and criticism with the purpose of studying how African women configure themselves in literature and how they (re)define feminist theory. Authors to be studied include: El Saadawi, Emecheta, Alkali, Nzapa, Head, Ngcobo, Lessing, Gordimer, Aidoo, Ba, and Joyce.

ABD 245
RACE AND ETHNICITY IN LITERARY STUDIES
(UGRD)

This course examines various ways in which race is constructed and, concurrently, how race as a "fiction" operates in literary studies. Literature presents and explores the ways in which the world is viewed and experienced by individuals in a particular society or social group. Since literature provides unique insights into different historical and cultural movements, studying how race is understood and deployed (explicitly and implicitly) in a text provides a powerful way to examine the fluidity of race and to compare how it is understood in different parts of the Black diaspora.

ABD 246
PRINCIPLES OF AFRICAN ART
(UGRD)

This introductory-level course surveys the arts of select cultures from west and central Africa. The course will focus on the arts of royalty as a means by which to introduce basic concepts and larger issues within the field. The arts of groups who borrow from royal iconography, such as diviners, religious cults, societies of elders, and others, will also be investigated. Themes pertinent throughout the course include issues of gender, colonialism, cultural interaction, and historical change in both visual art and the nature of kingship. Cross-listed as HAA 101.

ABD 247
ANCIENT AFRICAN ART: PREHISTORIC TO THE EUROPEAN ENCOUNTER
(UGRD)

This course surveys a selection of artistic traditions from across the African continent beginning with the earliest attempts by humanity to visually represent complex thought until the Portuguese began trading along the coast of West Africa in the mid-fifteenth century. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating connectedness with a larger cultural environment, while also suggesting connections to future artistic traditions. Cross-listed with HAA 201.

ABD 248
MODERN AFRICAN ART: EUROPEAN ENCOUNTER TO INDEPENDENCE
(UGRD)

This course surveys a selection of artistic traditions from across the African continent beginning with the arrival of the Portuguese along the coast of West Africa in the mid-fifteenth century until the age of African independence in the 1960s. While the impact of a European presence helps define the boundaries of this course, artistic response to that presence is but one theme. Interactions between African cultures and the impact of Islam are equally important considerations. Cross-listed as HAA 202.

ABD 249
JAZZ AND THE DIASPORIC IMAGINATION
(UGRD)

This course will examine the role jazz has played in the cultural imagination of people across the African Diaspora. What does jazz symbolize for authors and artists, and how have they adapted jazz to fit their own aesthetic, ideological, and political needs? How has it been used in literature, visual art, politics, sociology (among others)? What are the different ways in which 'jazz' (itself a multifaceted idea) has been imagined, presented, and manipulated? Figures to be examined include: Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Romare Bearden, Langston Hughes, Jackson Pollock, Billie Holiday, Ralph Ellison, Dizzy Gillespie, John Coltrane, among others.

ABD 251
WORLD REFUGEE CRISIS
(UGRD)

This is a survey of global refugee crisis and internal displacement between 1945 and the present. The course will focus on the following issues and challenges: human rights, definitions and causes of crisis, internal/external displacements, 'environmental' refugees, protection and integration, refugee children, and conflict resolutions in post-war societies. Cross-listed with HST 241.

ABD 252
CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN ART: INDEPENDENCE TO THE PRESENT
(UGRD)

This course surveys African art from the age of African independence in the 1960s until the present day. The meaning of the term contemporary as it applies to African art is questioned in this course. The position of the artist between African artistic tradition and the global art market is also of vital importance. Cross-listed with HAA 203.

ABD 254
AFRICAN POLITICS
(UGRD)

An introduction to African politics. The course will focus on the basic concepts, issues, and theoretical models used in studies of the dynamics of government and politics in Africa from the pre-colonial era to the contemporary period. Cross-listed with PSC 254.

ABD 256
AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1800
(UGRD)

West African culture, the middle passage, development of the Slave trade, introduction of slavery into the American colonies, African-Americans in the Revolutionary War and the Constitution. Cross-listed as HST 246.

ABD 257
AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY, 1800-1900
(UGRD)

African-American participation in frontier life, in the growth of the cotton industry, in the Civil War and Reconstruction to Booker T. Washington. Cross-listed as HST 247.

ABD 258
AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY, 1900 TO PRESENT
(UGRD)

The African experience in America is expansive, beginning in the colonial era and lasting through the present day. This course will focus on only a portion of that history-1900 to the present. This course is organized thematically with an emphasis on topics such as migration, urbanization, segregation, 20th century constructions of blackness, arts & culture, African Americans and the World Wars, black political thought, freedom movements, and criminalization.

ABD 259
MOVIN' UP: BLACK MIGRATION TO THE NORTH, 1877 - 1941
(UGRD)

This course examines African American migration in an era that also saw mass European and Asian emigration and immigration. It discusses the relationship between migration and citizenship for African Americans during what became known as the Great Migration. We will explore the social, cultural, economic and intellectual motivations for migration in order to understand the development of an African American identity.

ABD 260
DIMENSIONS OF BLACK FAMILY LIFE
(UGRD)

This course will introduce students to the study of Black family life in Africa and its Diaspora. Special attention will be given to the ways in which values and patterns of living and thought are communicated across generations (time) and transported across geography (space).

ABD 261
RADICAL AESTHETICS OF HIP HOP
(UGRD)

This course engages the interrelated art forms that comprise hip hop, a culture conceived by African American, Afro-Caribbean and Latino youth in the 1970s. In this course, students will explore hip hop culture?s aesthetic strategies through a survey history of its four elements?emceeing, deejaying, bboying/bgirling, graffitti?and traces their wide influence in music, visual culture, dance, theatre, and politics. This course is interested in how hip hop culture has negotiated inequality through aesthetic practices that portray the fissures of the American dream while modeling alternatives.

ABD 272
MUSLIM WOMEN IN TEXTS
(UGRD)

This course aims to examine texts written on Muslim women by themselves, by non-Muslim women and by Muslim men. Several questions are raised by the subject itself. One such question focuses on what is intrinsically Islamic with respect to ideas about women and gender. Another question centers on what is the model Muslim woman given the diversity of cultural manifestations of Islam. This course emerges from these questions and others exploring who is writing what about Muslim women, for what audience. Cross-listed with REL 272 and IWS 272.

ABD 274
WOMEN IN AFRICAN RELIGION AND CULTURE
(UGRD)

A study of the role of religion and culture in the lives of women in Africa, introducing students to an "emic" (insider) interpretation of beliefs and practices of the triple religious heritage (Indigenous religions, Christianity and Islam), and critically evaluating their implications for women.

ABD 275
BLACK FEMINIST THEORIES IN A U.S. CONTEXT
(UGRD)

This course surveys the major figures, statements, and movements that shape Black feminist thinking, writing and activism in the United States. Figures examined include: bell hooks, Ida B. Wells Barnett, Mary Church Terrell, Angela Davis, Michelle Wallace, Audre Lorde, and Mark Anthony Neal, among others. Cross-listed with WGS 275.

ABD 285
AFRO-HISPANIC LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION
(UGRD)

This course explores how race, class, politics and culture find expression in Afro-Hispanic literature. We will read works that have been translated into English from their original Spanish versions and analyze how the use of language, imagery and narrative voice reflect the experience of people of African descent in the Spanish-speaking world.

ABD 290
SPECIAL TOPICS
(UGRD)

This course explores various issues stemming from African and Black peoples being gendered and racialized subjects. Specific topics may vary.

ABD 300
AFRICAN ISLAM: ISLAMIC ART & ARCHITECTURE IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
(UGRD)

Focused study of the impact of Islam on the artistic traditions of sub-Saharan Africa. Rather than necessarily replacing previous art forms, this course investigates in what circumstances preexisting visual culture might be integrated with the requirements and needs of Islam. This approach necessitates an understanding that neither Islam nor African art are monolithic entities, but rather their interactions represent a wide variety of negotiations across the continent. Likewise, this course will consider specific historical circumstances to which Islamic art in sub-Saharan Africa has responded in terms of form and content. Cross-listed with HAA 302.

ABD 301
AFRICAN ARCHITECTURE
(UGRD)

This course examines a wide variety of issues pertinent to the study of architecture in Africa, highlighting above all else the diversity of traditions across the continent. Weekly themes are defined at times by materials, technology, type, geographical region, culture, or specific architectural elements. Examples of subjects studied include: earthen mosques of Mali; subterranean residences in Burkina Faso; nomadic tents; impluvial and courtyard traditions of Nigeria and Senegal; mural painting in Burkina Faso, Nigeria, and South Africa; Ethiopian rock cut churches; imperialist exploitation of Great Zimbabwe's legacy; and coral architecture of the Swahili Coast. Art history and related disciplines. Cross-listed with HAA 301.

ABD 302
MODEL ARAB LEAGUE
(UGRD)

This course is centered around students' participation in the Model Arab League as delegates from member-states. Students engage with each other from universities in the Mid-West region on the most important social, economic, environmental, cultural and political issues facing Arab leaders and ordinary citizens. The course also focuses on parliamentary procedures of African states represented. Cross-listed with IWS 202.

ABD 303
THEMES IN AFRICAN DIASPORA STUDIES
(UGRD)

Recent scholarship argues that Africa is not limited to geography, but is found in the traditions and identities of many peoples around the world. This course will examine different major themes in the study of the African and Black diaspora. Specific topics may vary.

ABD 305
PAN-AFRICANISM
(UGRD)

The course will examine the often ambivalent place of Africa in the imaginations, cultures and politics of people in the African diaspora. Students will explore the contributions of African, African-American and Caribbean intellectuals in the formation of diasporic movements and Pan-African thought. We will ask, to what degree was the ideology of Pan-Africanism and the iconography of Africa employed to mobilize masses of black people around local and domestic issues? How important has a consciousness of Africa been to the construction of cultural identities in the diaspora, and how have class, gender, and race shaped or constrained those identities? Our goal is to develop further insights into how people of the African diaspora have continually reinvented and imagined the home of their ancestors, in turn reinventing and imagining themselves.

ABD 320
AFRICAN AMERICAN SCIENCE FICTION
(UGRD)

This course studies the science fiction by Black writers as well as critical responses to these novels and writers. The course explores the treatment of gender, oppression and empowerment, historical implications (past, present, future) of the middle passage, chattel slavery, and the struggle for freedom.

ABD 336
AFRICAN-AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT
(UGRD)

Considers black political thought through a variety of ideological, political, legal and historical perspectives. First explores early efforts by blacks to challenge the racialized limitations of America's core principles of liberty, equality and democracy in the contexts of abolitionism, the women's suffrage movements, Manifest Destiny, and American industrialism. Then concentrates on the evolution of contemporary black political thought, with an emphasis on both conceptual diversity and continuity over time. Cross-listed with PSC 336.

ABD 345
THE LITERATURE OF IDENTITY
(UGRD)

Cross-Cultural Study of self-discovery and identity as manifested in the literatures of self-awareness and self-definition. Authors to be studied include: Michael Anthony, Frantz Fanon, Jamaica Kincaid, George Lamming, V. S. Naipaul, and Jane Rhys.

ABD 348
RELIGIONS IN AFRICA AND THE DIASPORA
(UGRD)

An advanced examination of the indigenous religions of Africa as they encounter other religious traditions throughout the world.

ABD 351
RECONSTRUCTION AND THE RISE OF JIM CROW
(UGRD)

Covers the problems of reunion between the North and the South after the Civil War, including the struggle for African-Americans' civil and political rights, the transition to a free labor economy in the South, and the eventual end of reconstruction and establishment of racial segregation in the South and the nation. Cross-listed with HST 379.
ABD 208 or consent of the instructor is a prerequisite for this course.

ABD 365
VOTING, REPRESENTATION, AND THE LAW
(UGRD)

This course explores the struggles of African Americans and women, as individuals who were excluded from the franchise on the basis of their being an African American, a woman, or both, to gain access to the ballot. The relation of women and African Americans to the ballot is worthy of investigation for two reasons. First, with the exception of 18 year olds, women and Black Americans are the two groups who have required amendments to the Constitution to secure their right to vote. Second, they share a history, often contentious, of political struggle. In addition, the course will investigate what this history of political struggle can tell us about American law, politics, and society.

ABD 369
TOPICS IN PUBLIC LAW
(UGRD)

This course engages the research and analyses in the field of public law - how do political scientists, public policy analysts and others develop informed public policy and law. Topics vary from year to year.

ABD 370
FEMINIST THEOLOGIES
(UGRD)

An exploration of women's experience as a primary resource and norm for theology, focusing on themes of inclusion, exclusion, representation and liberation in particular social, political and historical contexts.

ABD 371
AFRICAN- AMERICAN FICTION
(UGRD)

Selected novels and short fiction by twentieth-century African-American writers. Cross-listed with ENG 371.

ABD 372
AFRICAN AMERICAN DRAMA AND POETRY
(UGRD)

Survey of Black poetry and drama from 1865 to the present.

ABD 373
TOPICS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN POETRY 1940-1960
(UGRD)

African-American Poetry 1940 - 1960

ABD 374
THE BLACK ARTS MOVEMENT
(UGRD)

This course looks at the intersection between political and artistic movements of the Black Power and Black Arts Movements. We will survey the aesthetic and political aspects of this era, including poetry, novels, drama, music, visual arts and film.

ABD 375
REPRESENTATION OF AFRICAN AMERICANS IN MEDIA
(UGRD)

A media analysis course that will analyze media coverage of African Americans from the 19th century to the present. Through lectures, guest speakers, readings and research, students will probe the ways in which the media has influenced and dictated the perceptions and destinies of African Americans, as well as its impact on America's ongoing challenge, as W.E.B. DuBois put it more than a century ago, to "conquer the color line."

ABD 379
BLACK FEMINIST THEORY
(UGRD)

This course engages with the multiple versions of woman-centered theory and practice developed in the writings; activism, and other creative work of Black, particularly African American women, from the mid-nineteenth century to the twenty-first. While not all of these theorists would use the word feminist; all have in common the aim of empowering women's lives, advocating for women for equal economic, political, and cultural access.

ABD 380
TOPICS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES
(UGRD)

This course examines figures, texts, cultures or issues in African American studies. Specific topics may vary by term.

ABD 382
TOPICS IN AFRICAN DIASPORA STUDIES
(UGRD)

Topics vary. See schedule for titles and department website for specific descriptions.

ABD 386
BLACK WOMEN'S LIVES
(UGRD)

This course is a variable topics course directed to the examination of topics such as black women's cultural criticism, Black women in the arts, Black lesbian rights, Black women's participation in social movements, representation in the media, etc. Cross-listed with WGS 386.

ABD 390
TOPICS IN POPULAR CULTURE IN THE BLACK DIASPORA
(UGRD)

This course explores various topics in popular culture studies through the lens of the African Diaspora, including music, film, television, popular literature and subcultural practices. Specific topics may vary by quarter.

ABD 391
CAPSTONE
(UGRD)

This senior seminar engages students in a synthesis of what they have learned through coursework. The capstone course will involve reading, writing, discussion, as well as the preparation by students of a substantive piece of work (e.g., a senior thesis, a research paper, or a creative work.)

ABD 398
FRENCHNESS (RE) DEFINED: RACE & GENDER IN MODERN FRANCE
(UGRD)

The goal of this course, which will be taught in English, is to introduce to you the history of France in the late modern period (1789-present) through the critical lens of race and gender. We will also develop the tools for thinking critically about gender and race as categories of analysis.
FCH 101 and FCH 102 are a prerequisite for this class.

ABD 399
INDEPENDENT STUDY
(UGRD)

Independent study. Variable credit.

AHT 310
DIAGNOSTIC NUCLEAR IMAGING CLINICAL PRACTICUM I
(UGRD)

Supervised clinical education that gives the student the opportunity to perform a variety of patient procedures on both SPECT, SPECT/CT, PET and PET/CT imaging systems for all diagnostic, therapeutic, non-imaging in-vivo and in-vitro procedures. Clinical competencies developed in patient care, positioning techniques, analyzing images, and the selection of imaging parameters and collimators. Knowledge of integrated computer systems designed for use with clinical gamma cameras, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), SPECT/CT, Positron Emission Tomography (PET), and PET/CT images. The clinical practicum is designed to promote independent critical thinking, balanced responsibility, organization and accountability in the student. Students will demonstrate competence in all procedures presented.

AHT 311
DIAGNOSTIC NUCLEAR IMAGING CLINICAL PRACTICUM II
(UGRD)

Supervised clinical education that gives the student the opportunity to perform a variety of patient procedures on both SPECT, SPECT/CT, PET and PET/CT imaging systems for all diagnostic, therapeutic, non-imaging in-vivo and in-vitro procedures. Clinical competencies developed in patient care, positioning techniques, analyzing images, and the selection of imaging parameters and collimators. Knowledge of integrated computer systems designed for use with clinical gamma cameras, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), SPECT/CT, Positron Emission Tomography (PET), and PET/CT images. The clinical practicum is designed to promote independent critical thinking, balanced responsibility, organization and accountability in the student. Students will demonstrate competence in all procedures presented.

AHT 312
CLINICAL NUCLEAR MEDICINE PROCEDURES I
(UGRD)

Emphasis on theory and techniques of clinical procedures used in nuclear medicine imaging. Areas emphasized include patient care, developing acquisition parameters, imaging techniques, radionuclide identification, energies, half-lives, and principles of radionuclides in imaging and non-imaging procedures. Students will continue to develop an increased degree of competence in their performance of the skills related to critical thinking and problem solving.

AHT 313
CLINICAL NUCLEAR MEDICINE PROCEDURES II
(UGRD)

Emphasis on theory and techniques of clinical procedures used in nuclear medicine imaging. Areas emphasized include patient care, developing acquisition parameters, imaging techniques, radionuclide identification, energies, half-lives, and principles of radionuclides in imaging and non-imaging procedures. Students will continue to develop an increased degree of competence in their performance of the skills related to critical thinking and problem solving.

AHT 314
MANAGEMENT AND METHODS OF PATIENT CARE I
(UGRD)

Skills in problem solving, critical-thinking, and decision-making are developed as well as oral and written communication skills. Career skills are enhanced through the interview process, resume writing, and administrative duties including; budgeting, medical and legal considerations and political issues affecting health care. Special emphasis is placed on research methods, medical law and ethics, and scheduling guidelines. Focus on basic measures necessary to provide quality patient care. Basic principles of record keeping and maintaining confidentiality of information are explained.

AHT 315
MANAGEMENT AND METHODS OF PATIENT CARE II
(UGRD)

Skills in problem solving, critical-thinking, and decision-making are developed as well as oral and written communication skills. Career skills are enhanced through the interview process, resume writing, and administrative duties including budgeting, medical and legal considerations and political issues affecting health care. Special emphasis is placed on research methods, medical law and ethics, and scheduling guidelines. Focus on basic measures necessary to provide quality patient care. Basic principles of record keeping and maintaining confidentiality of information are explained. (2 quarter hours)

AHT 316
RADIATION BIOLOGY
(UGRD)

Knowledge of cell structure and function as a basis for understanding cellular and organ responses to the effects of ionizing radiation, radionuclides and radiation oncology. Understanding units of exposure, organ dose calculation and body distribution. (1 quarter hour)

AHT 317
MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY
(UGRD)

The medical terminology course consists of a study of root words, prefixes, and suffixes of medical vocabulary. Also included are medical abbreviations and applicable symbols. A combination of learning exercises and chapter quizzes are utilized. Emphasis is on application of terminology through the use of chapter objectives, learning exercises, and critical thinking exercises. As an independent study, students may choose to progress more rapidly than the assignment schedule outlines. (1 quarter hour)

AHT 321
MANAGEMENT AND METHODS PATIENT CARE
(UGRD)

Content is designed to provide the student with foundational concepts and competencies in assessment and evaluation of the patient for service delivery. Psychological and physical needs and factors affecting treatment outcome will be presented and examined. Students will also get a better understanding of how race, gender, physical ability, sexual orientation, spirituality, healing and dying, and age play a role in cultural competence. Routine and emergency care procedures will be presented. Course will also include an orientation to hyperthermia, chemotherapy, body mechanics, nutrition for cancer patients, and an overview of radiation therapy patient side effects. (2 quarter hours)

AHT 322
QUALITY MANAGEMENT
(UGRD)

Content is designed to focus on the evolution of quality management (QM) programs and continuing quality improvement in radiation oncology. Topics will include the need for quality assurance (QA) checks; QA of the clinical aspects and chart checks, film checks; the various types of evaluations and tests performed on simulators, megavoltage therapy equipment, and therapy planning units; the role of radiation therapists in quality management programs; legal and regulatory implications for maintaining appropriate guidelines; and the role computers and information systems serve within the radiation oncology department. (2 quarter hours)

AHT 323
CLINICAL PRACTICUM I
(UGRD)

The overall objective of this course is to aid the student in achieving basic level technical skills through supervised practice of radiation therapy procedures on actual patients. Students will be required to complete some ARRT required clinical competency examinations during this course. (2 quarter hours)

AHT 324
CLINICAL PRACTICUM II
(UGRD)

The overall objective of this course is to aid the student in achieving basic level technical skills through supervised practice of radiation therapy procedures on actual patients. This is a continuation of Clinical Practicum I. Students will be required to complete all remaining ARRT required clinical competency examinations during this course. (2 quarter hours)

AHT 325
INTRODUCTION TO RADIOLOGIC SCIENCES
(UGRD)

This course provides the student therapist with the technical aspects of radiography equipment. Discussion will include orientation to the function and operation of radiography equipment. (2 quarter hours)

AHT 326
RADIATION BIOLOGY
(UGRD)

This course introduces the student to the effects of ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents on living tissue. Emphasis is placed on the concept of the therapeutic ratio and the manipulation of influencing factors in order to affect patient treatment outcomes. (3 quarter hours)

AHT 327
RADIATION SAFETY AND PROTECTION
(UGRD)

The purpose of this course is to educate students regarding institutional, state and federal regulations controlling the sage use and disposal of radiation-producing equipment and sources. Emphasis is placed on ALARA principles to define the health professional's legal and ethical responsibility to minimize radiation dose to co-workers and patients, and oneself. (3 quarter hours)

AHT 329
PATHOLOGY
(UGRD)

This course introduces the student to the field of pathology with an emphasis on the oncologic disease processes. Topics range from discussion of pathology from the cellular level through various organ systems. Students are introduced to terminology related to the field of pathology as a whole and to the subspecialty of oncology specifically. (3 quarter hours)

AHT 330
RADIATION SAFETY AND PROTECTION
(UGRD)

Supervised practice and procedures for the receipt, handling, transporting, storage, usage, record keeping, disposal and decontamination of radioactive materials. Emphasis on licensing and regulations set forth by local, state and federal agencies. Academic and clinical instruction to provide the student with radiation safety techniques to minimize exposure to the patient, public, fellow workers and themselves. Regulations regarding therapeutic dosages and follow-up procedures. Focus on practical mathematics in nuclear medicine including radiation unit conversion, dose conversion, dose calculation, determination of specific activity, decay, and half-life calculation, counting efficiency, and statistics. (3 quarter hours)

AHT 331
RADIATION DETECTION AND INSTRUMENTATION
(UGRD)

Evaluation, maintenance and function of instrumentation used in imaging and in the laboratory. Principles and theory of PET/CT and scintillation camera operation and performance. Radiation measurement, event counting activity, pulse height spectra, detection efficiency, resolving time and statistics. Flood field and bar phantom use for assessing camera uniformity, relative sensitivity, spatial linearity and resolution testing. Quality assurance procedures for the PET scanner include radial, tangential and axial resolution, sensitivity, linearity, uniformity, attenuation accuracy, scatter determination and dead time corrections. Knowledge of the operations and maintenance of computer hardware and software. Emphasis on data collection, analysis and processing used in clinical imaging. Application of computer devices and memory usage. Emphasis on SPECT, SPECT/CT, PET and PET/CT quality control procedures. (3 quarter hours)

AHT 332
RADIATION PHYSICS AND INSTRUMENTATION
(UGRD)

Theory and physical principles associated with atomic structure, nuclear and quantum physics related to radioactive decay. Properties of the elements and the production of characteristic x and gamma rays, anger electrons and Bremsstrahlung. Instruction on the modes of decay, radiation dosimetry, and interaction of ionizing radiation with matter. Basic physics, instrumentation, and radiochemistry of SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography), SPECT/CT, Positron Emission Tomography (PET), and PET/CT. (3 quarter hours)

AHT 333
RADIONUCLIDE CHEMISTRY AND RADIOPHARMACY
(UGRD)

The chemical, physical and biological properties of radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnosis and therapy. Emphasis is given to the preparation, calculation, identification, administration, and disposal of radiopharmaceuticals. Performance of all radionuclide quality control and quality assurance procedures. Principles of decay and half-life, tissue localization, chemical impurities, generator systems, dose preparation and techniques of good laboratory practices and cell labeling. (3 quarter hours)

AHT 334
CLINICAL CORRELATION - PATHOLOGY
(UGRD)

Focus on the study of the structure and function of human cells, tissues, organs and systems. Clinical interpretation of organ systems with emphasis on immunology, and anatomy and physiology, which will provide a basis for understanding abnormal or pathological conditions as applied to nuclear medicine. Causes, symptoms, and treatments of disease are discussed as well as their effect on the images. In addition, the student is scheduled to observe the interpretation of images with the physician staff. (3 quarter hours)

AHT 335
COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY AND CROSS-SECTIONAL ANATOMY
(UGRD)

Introduction to the fundamental concepts and principles of computed technology and its role in medical imaging. Specific topics include physics & instrumentation of CT scanning, image production, and cross-sectional anatomy of the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Emphasis placed on patient considerations, patient safety, and radiation protection. (3 quarter hours)

AHT 341
RADIATION PHYSICS I
(UGRD)

Students are introduced to the principles and practice of applying ionizing radiation to the human body. Topics include discussion of radiation therapy equipment, including treatment units and computer planning systems with an emphasis on how this equipment is used to produce proper treatment planning and dose calculations, according to the radiation oncologist's prescription. Topics also include fundamental concepts of general physics and radiation physics, including the production of x-rays interactions with matter. (3 quarter hours)

AHT 342
RADIATION PHYSICS II
(UGRD)

Students are introduced to the principles and practice of applying ionizing radiation to the human body. Topics include discussion of radiation therapy equipment, including treatment units and computer planning systems with an emphasis on how this equipment is used to produce proper treatment planning and dose calculations, according to the radiation oncologist's prescription. Radiation protection and quality assurance will also be covered. This course is a continuation of Radiation Therapy Physics I. (3 quarter hours)

AHT 343
MEDICAL IMAGING AND PROCESSING
(UGRD)

Procedure for imaging human structure and their relevance to radiation therapy; topographical anatomy, radiographic and cross sectional anatomy. Identification of anatomic structures as demonstrated through various imaging modalities. (2 quarter hours)

AHT 344
OPERATION ISSUES IN RADIATION THERAPY
(UGRD)

Content is designed to focus on various allied health operational issues. Continuing Quality Improvement (CQI) project development, evaluation, and assessment techniques will be emphasized. Human resource issues and regulations impacting the radiation therapist will be examined. Accreditation agencies and the licensed practitioner's role in the accreditation process will be presented. Billing and reimbursement issues will be covered. (3 quarter hours)

AHT 345
PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF RADIATION THERAPY
(UGRD)

Content is designed to provide an overview of cancer and the specialty of radiation therapy. The medical, biological, and pathological aspect, as well as the physical and technical aspects, will be discussed. This course will also include content designed to provide the student with fundamental concepts, theories, and application of healthcare laws and ethical standards implemented and practiced in quality management for radiation therapy. Analysis of legal terminology, sources of law and the litigation process as applied to health professionals will be evaluated. (2 quarter hours)

AHT 346
PRINCIPLE AND PRACTICE OF RADIATION THERAPY II
(UGRD)

This course is a continuation of principles and practice of radiation therapy I. Critical thinking and the basics of ethical and clinical decision making are fostered in the student. The epidemiology, etiology, detection, diagnosis, patient condition, treatment, and prognosis of neoplastic disease will be presented, discussed, and evaluated in the relationship to histology, anatomical site, and patterns of spread. The radiation therapist's responsibility in the management of neoplastic disease will be examined and linked to the skills required to analyze complex issues and make informed decisions while appreciating the character of the profession. (2 quarter hours)

AHT 347
TECHNICAL RADIATION ONCOLOGY
(UGRD)

This course provides the student therapist with the technical aspects of radiation therapy. Discussion will include orientation to the function and operation of radiation therapy equipment. The clinical lab component of this course provides a hands-on, sequential application, and clinical integration of concepts and theories in the radiation therapy clinic and the didactic portion of this course. Concepts of team practice, patient-centered and clinical practice will also be discussed. (2 quarter hours)

AHT 348
TECHNICAL RADIATION ONCOLOGY
(UGRD)

This course is designed to focus on discussions of various treatment and simulation procedures of different pathologies. The lab component will continue to provide a hands-on, sequential application, and clinical integration of concepts and theories in the radiation therapy clinic. (3 quarter hours)

AHT 365
URINE ANALYSIS AND BODY FLUIDS
(UGRD)

Body fluids such as urine, pleural, and spinal are examined to determine the kinds and numbers of body cells present. The students will master quantitative and qualitative testing of urine is done. This includes testing for pH, color, specific gravity, sugars and excessive amounts of protein. Urine and other body fluids are also examined for the presence of bacteria and parasites as well as crystals and casts formed by the kidneys.

AHT 371
FUNDAMENTALS OF CLINICAL CHEMISTRY
(UGRD)

This course presents the development of fundamental laboratory skills laboratory operations and automation in a lecture format.

AHT 372
APPLICATIONS OF CLINICAL CHEMISTRY
(UGRD)

This course in the clinical laboratory pertains to the acquisition of manual and automated laboratory skills to test patient samples utilizing complex instrumentation and understanding the principals of test procedures, instrumentation, quality control and approved safety practices. State-of-the art automation and robotics enable the laboratory to provide critical diagnostic information quickly and accurately to physicians in such areas as the emergency department, intensive care, surgery and the neonatal intensive care unit. In addition, the Clinical Chemistry Laboratory offers testing for the assessment of many metabolic systems that can include cholesterol measurement, thyroid and reproductive hormone levels, and therapeutic drug monitoring. Students will work with up-to-date, computer-assisted technology to provide critical as well as routine testing for effective patient care.

AHT 373
ADVANCED APPLICATIONS OF CLINICAL CHEMISTRY
(UGRD)

This is a lecture course presenting in depth theory, pathophysiology, and high level of problem solving commonly seen in the laboratory. This didactic portion of the program is presented by pathologists, PhD scientists and experienced Medical Laboratory Scientists.

AHT 374
FUNDAMENTALS OF HEMATOLOGY
(UGRD)

This laboratory develops fundamental laboratory skills in Hematology. This experience includes lecture presentations, demonstrations, clinical observations and hands-on practical experience. Students learn to prepare and stain peripheral blood smears in preparation for counting and classification of the various types of red and white blood cells among other labs.

AHT 375
CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY AND COAGULATION
(UGRD)

In the Clinical Hematology Laboratory students will master blood counts and cellular classification. They also learn how to determine whether the oxygen-carrying red blood cells are in a healthy state, an essential procedure for diagnosis of anemia. In addition, the students will be shown how to classify the cells in the bone marrow to assist the pathologist in the identification of leukemia and other blood disorders. Tests are conducted in the Coagulation section of the Hematology Laboratory to determine the presence or absence of factors essential to normal blood coagulation. Special procedures are performed to identify acquired and inherited deficiencies of the coagulation proteins.

AHT 376
ADVANCED APPLICATIONS IN HEMATOLOGY AND COAGULATION
(UGRD)

This is a lecture course presenting in depth theory, pathophysiology, and high level of problem solving commonly seen in the laboratory. This didactic portion of the program is presented by pathologists, PhD scientists and experienced Medical Laboratory Scientists.

AHT 378
FUNDAMENTALS OF CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY
(UGRD)

The Microbiology Laboratory deals with the isolation and identification of potentially pathogenic microorganisms. In many cases the laboratory also determines the susceptibility of the etiologic agent to a variety of antibiotics. This laboratory is divided into Bacteriology, Mycology, Mycobacteriology, Parasitology, and Virology. Bacteriology is concerned with the various bacteria that may cause direct destruction of tissue or harmful sequelae. Throat, urine, stool, blood, wound and sputum cultures are some of the types of specimens received for processing.

AHT 379
CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY
(UGRD)

This course presents an ideal learning environment for the development of fundamental laboratory skills in Clinical Microbiology. This experience includes lecture presentations, demonstrations, clinical observations and hands-on practical experience. In this introductory student microbiology laboratory course, students learn to prepare and stain gram smears in order to identify microorganisms. The students will learn to prepare and read culture plates.

AHT 380
ADVANCED APPLICATION OF MICROBIOLOGY
(UGRD)

This is a lecture course presenting in depth theory, pathophysiology, and high level of problem solving commonly seen in the laboratory. This didactic portion of the program is presented by pathologists, PhD scientists and experienced Medical Laboratory Scientists.

AHT 381
APPLICATIONS OF CLINICAL VIROLOGY
(UGRD)

Virology course approaches the study of viruses and isolating viruses such as influenza, chicken pox, cytomegalovirus, and herpes from clinical specimens utilizing advanced molecular techniques. Students will learn to perform these routine methods and procedures commonly used identify these and other viruses. Highly sensitive nucleic acid amplification methods, including real-time PCR, are used to detect low concentrations of infectious agents such as Herpes simplex. Quantitative (viral load) tests for hepatitis C and HIV nucleic acid are used to monitor response to therapy. Analysis of mutated genes is performed to evaluate patients with clotting disorders, and clonal gene rearrangement studies are used in the diagnosis of lymphomas.

AHT 382
PARASITOLOGY
(UGRD)

In the Parasitology course, specimens are examined for the presence of amoebae, malarial organisms, worms and their ova, and flagellates. Larger parasites, such as mites, fleas or ticks are also identified so the appropriate disease diagnosis can be made, treatment started, and public health concerns addressed.

AHT 383
MYCOLOGY
(UGRD)

Mycology deals with fungi that may infect man on the surface of the skin (i.e., ringworm) or cause systemic complications (i.e., histoplasmosis). Mycobacteriology is the study of such organisms as that which causes tuberculosis.

AHT 384
FUNDAMENTALS OF IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY
(UGRD)

The student will master the techniques of ABO blood grouping methods, Rh testing, crossmatching and identification of red blood cell antibodies. In addition, the student learns about the preparation and use of blood components and observes blood collection procedures including whole blood and apheresis donations, as well as hematopoietic progenitor cell collection. Blood bank activities require close coordination with the clinical care units, so students in this laboratory have a sense of direct involvement in patient care.

AHT 385
FUNDMENTATLS OF IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY AND TRANSFUSION MEDICINE
(UGRD)

This basic laboratory course presents the development of fundamental laboratory skills in blood banking and transfusion medicine. This experience includes lecture presentations, demonstrations, clinical observations and hands-on practical experience. During the blood bank laboratory course, the student will master ABO & Rh phenotyping, the indirect antiglobulin test and identify simple red blood cell antibodies. Immediate spin and indirect antiglobulin crossmatch techniques are also learned.

AHT 386
ADVANCED APPLICATIONS OF IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY
(UGRD)

This is a lecture course presenting in depth theory, pathophysiology, and high level of problem solving commonly seen in the laboratory. This didactic portion of the program is presented by pathologists, PhD scientists and experienced Medical Laboratory Scientists.

AHT 387
FUNDAMENTALS OF IMMUNOPATHOLOGY
(UGRD)

This basic laboratory course presents an ideal learning environment for the development of fundamental laboratory skills in Immunology and serology. This experience includes lecture presentations, demonstrations, clinical observations and hands-on practical experience.

AHT 388
CLINICAL IMMUNOPATHOLOGY
(UGRD)

The Immunopathology Laboratory performs state-of-the art testing in Flow Cytometry and Diagnostic Immunology. In Flow Cytometry special emphasis is placed on diagnosis of leukemias and lymphomas and monitoring of immunologic pathologies. Rotation through the Immunology section includes performance of protein chemistry and infectious disease serology; detection of tumor markers; and pregnancy and prenatal diagnosis.

AHT 389
ADVANCED APPLICATION OF IMMUNOPATHOLOGY
(UGRD)

This is a lecture course presenting in depth theory, pathophysiology, and high level of problem solving commonly seen in the laboratory. This didactic portion of the program is presented by pathologists, PhD scientists and experienced Medical Laboratory Scientists.

ASL 101
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I
(UGRD)

This course is a basic introduction to American Sign Language (ASL), the language used by Deaf people in the United States and most of Canada. This course will help students develop their expressive and receptive ASL skills. Students will also learn about Deaf culture since a language cannot be separated from its culture.

ASL 101S
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I FOR SUMMER
(UGRD)

(Covers the equivalent of ASL 101 and the first half of ASL 102.) The first half of beginning American Sign Language (ASL), the language used by Deaf people in the United States and most of Canada. This course will help students develop their expressive and receptive ASL skills. Students will also learn about Deaf culture since a language cannot be separated from its culture.

ASL 102
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II
(UGRD)

This is the second Basic American Sign Language course in a series of ASL courses. Students will develop expressive and receptive ASL skills through discussions of topics such as living situations, family and occupations, and daily routines or activities. In addition, students will develop storytelling skills. Throughout the session, readings about Deaf culture will also be incorporated since a language cannot be separated from its culture.

ASL 103
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE III
(UGRD)

This is the third Basic American Sign Language course in a series of ASL courses. Students will develop expressive and receptive ASL skills through discussions of such topics as giving directions, describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, and talking about routines. Students will also learn about Deaf culture, since a language cannot be separated from its culture.

ASL 103S
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE III FOR SUMMER
(UGRD)

(Covers the equivalent of the second half of ASL 102 and all of ASL 103.) The second half of beginning American Sign Language. Students will develop expressive and receptive ASL skills through discussions of such topics as giving directions, describing others, making requests, talking about family and occupations, attributing qualities to others, and talking about routines. Students will also learn about Deaf culture, since a language cannot be separated from its culture.

ASL 104
INTERMEDIATE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I
(UGRD)

Intensive practice in the use of American Sign Language, expanding from beginners' skills acquired in Basic American Sign Language (ASL) courses. The course involves intensive practice in the use of American Sign Language, and continued enhancement of the cultural awareness intrinsic to those skills. ASL 103 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 105
INTERMEDIATE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II
(UGRD)

This course is a continuation of American Sign Language (ASL), Level Two. It includes vocabulary-building and mastery of grammar through rigorous receptive and expressive language activities. Topics discussed in ASL include exchanges of personal information or life events, description of abstract objects, and continued enhancement of the cultural awareness intrinsic to those skills. ASL 104 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 106
INTERMEDIATE SIGN LANGUAGE III
(UGRD)

Intensive practice in the use of American Sign Language, and continued enhancement of the cultural awareness intrinsic to those skills. Continuation of ASL 105. ASL 105 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 199
INDEPENDENT STUDY
(UGRD)

Variable credit.

ASL 201
ADVANCED COMMUNICATION I
(UGRD)

Advanced level intensive practice in the use of American Sign Language, and continued enhancement of the cultural awareness intrinsic to those skills. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 202
ADVANCED COMMUNICATION II
(UGRD)

Advanced level intensive practice in the use of American Sign Language, and continued enhancement of the cultural awareness intrinsic to those skills. Continuation of ASL 201. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 203
ADVANCED COMMUNICATION III
(UGRD)

Advanced level intensive practice in the use of American Sign Language, and continued enhancement of the cultural awareness intrinsic to those skills. Continuation of ASL 202. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 299
INDEPENDENT STUDY
(UGRD)

Variable credit.

ASL 305
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE LITERATURE
(UGRD)

This course will focus on selected ASL videotapes and films ranging from the early 1900's to the present. It shares similar elements and functions with any literature in any language. Students will study the historical background of deaf actors and actresses in silent films, analyze the content of stories, discuss grammatical features in ASL or ASL expressions signed by deaf people, and discuss the various signing registers and styles revealed in these contents. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 306
ARTS IN THE DEAF COMMUNITY
(UGRD)

A study of arts in the deaf community including the history and movement of De'VIA. Students will develop awareness and recognition of Deaf professional artists and the respective meaning behind their work. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 310
DEAF CULTURE
(UGRD)

This course is an introduction to concepts and issues in Deaf culture and the Deaf community. This course emphasizes the Deaf community as a linguistic and American cultural minority, the importance of language and education of the deaf people, as well as values, traditions, political activism and diversity in this group. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 311
DEAF-BLIND COMMUNITY
(UGRD)

An introduction to various aspects of the deaf-blind community including cultural norms and modes of communication used with deaf-blind communities. Students will develop an understanding of the role of Support Service Provider (SSP) or sighted guide. Opportunities for hands-on experience and interaction with the deaf-blind community will be provided. This course will be open to students who may or may not have had prior experiences with the deaf-blind community. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 321
ART OF TRANSLATION
(UGRD)

This course focuses on development of written English translations from ASL and verbal translation from ASL into English. This course will train students to focus on the meaning expressed in ASL concepts and provide proper translations. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 352
ASL LINGUISTICS
(UGRD)

This course will help students understand the basic concepts of linguistics as they think critically about ASL structure, including the fundamental areas of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and language in use. Also, it will help students compare and contrast ASL and English structures. Additionally, it will provide students with the ability to understand how people can communicate through different kinds of systems, including languages which have several features. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 353
FINGERSPELLING
(UGRD)

This course will teach the theory behind fingerspelling and will train students on how to process serial information. Students will be able to identify invisible allophones and improve their receptive fingerspelling skills. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 354
SOCIOLINGUISTICS FOR THE DEAF COMMUNITY
(UGRD)

This course focuses on issues affecting the Deaf community and studies the use of ASL in society, along with policies created for and attitudes towards the Deaf community. Students will broaden their understanding of the Deaf community by engaging in discourse analysis as well as interacting with the different populations in the Deaf community. ASL 106 or equivalent, including placement test or permission of instructor, is recommended.

ASL 395
FOREIGN LANGUAGES ACROSS CURRICULUM
(UGRD)

The two credit FLAC course allows students to enrich their experience in the co-required course through added reading, writing, and signing activities in ASL. Students must have the equivalent of 106 or higher ability in ASL to take this two credit component. Please contact the Department of Modern Languages if you have questions about this course or about language placement.

ASL 399
INDEPENDENT STUDY
(UGRD)

Variable credit.

ASL 499
INDEPENDENT STUDY
(GRAD)

Variable credit.

AMS 150
PERSPECTIVES ON AMERICA
(UGRD)

This course explores a variety of perspectives on what it means to be an American in the modern world, looking through polarities such as: urban and suburban life, localism and globalism, high culture and mass culture, corporate society and populism. Considerations of various media such as television, movies, and newspapers, as well as study of artifacts.

AMS 200
AMERICAN SOCIAL HISTORY AND CULTURE
(UGRD)

This course will provide an overview of the central themes of American History from the colonial period to the present with a focus on social, popular, and cultural history.

AMS 201
CRITICAL AMERICAN STUDIES
(UGRD)

Using a range of interdisciplinary theories and methods, this course introduces students to critical American Studies as a field of scholarship that challenges the idea of the United States as socially and politically exceptional. Required course for AMS majors and minors.

AMS 202
UNITED STATES POPULAR MUSIC HISTORY
(UGRD)

This course introduces students to the historical significance of popular music in the United States from the 1890s to the present.

AMS 211
AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: EARLY AMERICA TO 1860
(UGRD)

This course focuses on America before the Civil War. Students will engage in project-based work that will examine a variety of texts, as well as material and visual culture in order to examine the competing themes and diverse voices that form American experience during this era. AMS 200 or HST 181 recommended, but not required prior to enrolling in this course.

AMS 213
AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: FROM 1860 TO 1941
(UGRD)

This course focuses on America between the Civil War and World War II. Students will engage in project-based work that will examine both visual culture and literature in order to examine the competing themes and diverse voices that form American experience during this era. AMS 200 or HST 182 recommended, but not required prior to enrolling in this course.

AMS 215
AMERICAN EXPERIENCE :FROM 1941 TO PRESENT
(UGRD)

This course focuses on America from World War II to the present. The course engages students in project-based works that utilizes multiple methodologies, primary sources, a range of texts, and material and visual culture. AMS 200 or HST 183 recommended, but not required prior to enrolling in this course.

AMS 220
AMERICAN BUDDHISMS: RACE AND RELIGIOUS DIVERSITY
(UGRD)

This course critically analyzes the origins of Buddhism in the United States in order to fully understand how and why Buddhism has flourished in Asian and White American communities, and to understand the conflict and controversy surrounding the racial dynamics of religious choice.

AMS 230
ASIAN AMERICAN HISTORIES
(UGRD)

This course introduces the pre-1965 comparative histories of people of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Indian, Filipino, and Southeast Asian ancestry from their arrival in significant numbers in the United States beginning in the 19th century. Two questions orient this course: 1) whether there is an historical validity to the category of Asian American, and if so, the extent to which the category is relevant today in light of differences across gender, sexuality, class, ethnicity, and religion, among others; and 2) how the Asian Pacific American experience challenges andredefines American race relations to provide a more complex understanding of existing structures of power. Cross-listed with AAS 200.

AMS 250
IN THEIR OWN VOICES: AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY
(UGRD)

This course presents a range of American autobiographies, from different places and from times ranging from Colonial to modern. The selected authors represent varying backgrounds and races.

AMS 261
AMERICAN ETHNICITIES 1800-1945
(UGRD)

This course will be an exploration of the development of American ethnic communities and identities in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Students will examine the American experience through the lens of ethnic groups and racialized ethnic populations and consider how ethnicity has shaped and influenced American history. We will study the experiences of American ethnic groups based on historical, social, and political factors such as immigration and citizenship, slavery and racialization, gender and patriarchy, religion and family, and the relationships between and among ethnic groups.

AMS 265
PACIFIC WORLD: NORTH AMERICA AND THE PACIFIC, 1776 - 1945
(UGRD)

This course will examine the nature of American identity in the west. Hawai'i and California represent the extreme edge of the American frontier. The focus will be on the shifting meanings of "native" and "stranger:" How did the status of indigenous peoples foster a sense of identity and place for migrants? How did immigrants understand their role in the political economy? How did racial discourses on the frontier shape the shifting definitions of citizenship? How did race affect America's ambivalent approach to imperialism?

AMS 275
HISTORY OF SEX IN AMERICA 1: COLONIAL TO LATE NINETEENTH CENTURY
(UGRD)

This course will provide an overview of the history of American sexuality from the colonial period to the late 19th century.

AMS 276
HISTORY OF SEX IN AMERICA 2: LATE VICTORIANS TO THE PRESENT
(UGRD)

This course will provide an overview of the history of American sexuality from the late nineteenth century to the present. Cross-listed with HST 276.

AMS 280
POLITICS AND HISTORY OF THE VIETNAM WAR
(UGRD)

This course examines both the history of American involvement in Vietnam and the lasting effect on American politics and culture.

AMS 290
AMERICAN VOICES: TO 1860
(UGRD)

Focusing on the era prior to the United States Civil War, this course provides an integrated, multidisciplinary view of American culture and ideas, addressing the questions: "What is America? What does it mean to be an American?" The courses are focused on primary sources, mostly first person narratives and fiction, developing methods for analyzing and interpreting these sources.

AMS 291
AMERICAN VOICES: FROM 1860 ONWARD
(UGRD)

Focusing on the era after the United States Civil War, this course provides an integrated, multidisciplinary view of American culture and ideas, addressing the questions: "What is America? What does it mean to be an American?" The courses are focused on primary sources, mostly first person narratives and fiction, developing methods for analyzing and interpreting these sources.
WRD 104 or HON 100 or HON 101 is a prerequisite for this class.

AMS 292
TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES THEORIES AND METHODS
(UGRD)

Variable topics that will prepare you to integrate a range of disciplinary understandings and methods into your written and oral analyses of American culture. Consult course schedule for current listings.

AMS 293
TOPICS IN AMERICAN MATERIAL CULTURE AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT
(UGRD)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

AMS 294
TOPICS IN AMERICAN POLITICS, INSTITUTIONS, AND VALUES
(UGRD)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

AMS 295
SPECIAL TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES
(UGRD)

Special Topics in American Studies. Consult schedule for topic.

AMS 296
TOPICS IN AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE AND MEDIA
(UGRD)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

AMS 297
TOPICS IN AMERICAN RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES
(UGRD)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

AMS 298
TOPICS IN AMERICAN SOCIAL AND LITERARY MOVEMENTS
(UGRD)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

AMS 301
SENIOR SEMINAR
(UGRD)

The Senior Seminar is an integrative course conducted primarily as a colloquium. Emphasis will be placed on discussion and independent research and writing.
Status as an American Studies major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

AMS 340
AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE: 1890s - 1930s
(UGRD)

This course will focus on the industrial developments, cultural significance and social effects of American Popular Culture institutions and products at the dawn of the 20th century, including the rise of corporate nationalism in live performances such as vaudeville and radio, as well as the development of mass media industries including sheet music, advertising, records, and film. Discussions will include attention to industrial practices, textual properties, and audience reception of these cultural products.

AMS 352
SEX, GENDER AND SOCIAL MEDIA
(UGRD)

This course focuses on the gendered and sex/sexuality content of major social media platforms and networking sites, such as Facebook, Youtube, Twitter, Pinterest, Reddit, and tumblr. We will ground our understanding of social media platforms in the context of established scholarship on social community development, cultural and media studies, and feminist and queer (LGBTQA) studies. Although our emphasis is on sexual and gendered aspects of identity, we will always view subjects as multiply-identified according to, most prominently, class, race, ethnicity, religion, nationality, and ability. We will examine how these platforms offer new opportunities for sexual education, sexual and erotic/romantic expression, the negotiation and exploration of sexual and gender identities, and feminist/queer media criticism, social activism, and community. We will also explore the more troubling aspects of social media, particularly its connection with global capitalism and neoliberal ideology, as well as how these platforms have provided new forums for public attacks on women and queer people.

AMS 360
AMERICAN FILM
(UGRD)

Analyzes cultural and cinematic histories and film as a social practice circulating cultural values as well as critiquing ideologies. Students will gain understanding of major critical and theoretical approaches and engage in research, critical thinking, and writing on topic areas. Variable specific topics. e. g. assimilation narratives, war in film, sports in film, Asian American film.

AMS 370
THE MATERIAL CULTURE OF MODERN AMERICA
(UGRD)

AMS 370 combines historical archaeology and material culture studies to examine how material goods both shape and reflect American identity in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

AMS 371
MATERIAL CULTURE OF EARLY AMERICA
(UGRD)

Combines historical archaeology and material culture studies to examine how material goods both shape and reflect American identity in the colonial period and early nineteenth century.

AMS 380
TELEVISION AND AMERICAN IDENTITY
(UGRD)

This course is about how television represents Americans and how Americans have responded to these representations. The course engages in close textual analysis of several television texts, to familiarize students with television industry narrative structures and strategies, examines several specific representational struggles, and surveys and discusses the many ways in which television viewers and fans engage with the text.

AMS 386
ADVANCED TOPICS IN AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE AND MEDIA
(UGRD)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

AMS 388
ADVANCED TOPICS IN AMERICAN SOCIAL AND LITERARY MOVEMENTS
(UGRD)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

AMS 392
INTERNSHIP
(UGRD)

Internship. Majors and minors only. Variable credit.
An American Studies major or minor is a prerequisite for this class.

AMS 393
ADVANCED TOPICS IN AMERICAN MATERIAL CULTURE AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT
(UGRD)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

AMS 394
ADVANCED TOPICS IN AMERICAN POLITICS, INSTITUTIONS, AND VALUES
(UGRD)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

AMS 395
ADVANCED TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES
(UGRD)

Topics in American Studies.

AMS 396
AMERICAN STUDIES COLLOQUIUM
(UGRD)

These courses involve participation in events and/or conferences on selected topics related to American culture studies. Class participants attend and participate in events, keep a reflective journal connecting the events, do related readings, and write a reflective summary on the colloquium as a whole. Variable credit.

AMS 397
ADVANCED TOPICS IN AMERICAN RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES
(UGRD)

Variable topics. Consult course schedule for current listings.

AMS 398
STUDY TOUR
(UGRD)

An on-site overview of the historical, political, social and economic connections between the United States and a foreign country. Credit variable.

AMS 399
INDEPENDENT STUDY
(UGRD)

Independent Study. Majors only. Variable credit.
An American Studies Major is a prerequisite for this class.

ANI 101
ANIMATION FOR NON-MAJORS
(UGRD)

Course introduces a variety of basic animation techniques for cinema and gaming, such as hand-drawn, cutout, stop-motion and (very basic) 3D, with an emphasis on the use of computer technology. Examples of diverse animation genres and styles (experimental, cartoon, anime, special effects, computer games) from different cultures will be screened and discussed. Students will explore the unique qualities of the medium through a series of hands-on projects that can be adapted to their own personal interests. They will learn about professional animation process (storyboard and animatic) during the production of a final project that encourages them to consider the role and potential of animation in our society.

ANI 105
MOTION GRAPHICS FOUNDATIONS
(UGRD)

This course introduces the basic principles of composition, color, light, and motion as applied to cinema and animation. Design for screen, staging, effective use of text, graphical elements, video, and motion are covered. These skills will be applied in projects that stress conceptual and technical development.

ANI 150
AFTER EFFECTS WORKSHOP
(UGRD)

This class will introduce students to the fundamentals of After Effects, including key-framing, compositing and rendering. Topics and techniques covered during lectures will be reinforced through in-class exercises and projects. (2 quarter hours)

ANI 151
ADOBE ANIMATE WORKSHOP
(UGRD)

This class will introduce students to the fundamentals of creating animation using Abode Animate, including tweening and frame-by-frame drawn animation. This class does not cover Action Script programming. Topics and techniques covered during lectures will be reinforced through in-class exercises and projects. (2 quarter hours)

ANI 152
TVPAINT WORKSHOP
(UGRD)

This workshop course offers a complete basic knowledge of using TVPaint animation software to produce hand-drawn animation. Topics and techniques covered during lectures will be reinforced through in-class exercises and projects. Prerequisite(s): none (2 quarter hours)

ANI 153
HARMONY WORKSHOP
(UGRD)

This workshop course offers a complete basic knowledge of using Toon Boom Harmony animation software to produce a hand-drawn animation. Topics and techniques covered during lectures will be reinforced through in-class exercises and projects. PREREQUISITE(S): None (2 quarter hours)

ANI 154
DIGITAL PAINTING WORKSHOP
(UGRD)

This course will investigate the image making possibilities of TVPaint and Photoshop in the creation of digital paintings and animations. The principles and practice of traditional painting (oil, acrylic and watercolor) will be applied to a digital image making practice, including the use of custom made brushes, filters, opacity, layer modes and texturing tools to create realistic and abstract imagery. PREREQUISITE(S): None

ANI 201
ANIMATION I
(UGRD)

This course is an introduction to the art and practice of animation. It is a studio-based class, which will emphasize learning through process, experimentation and creation. Students will explore the limitless possibilities of animated motion in the context of cinema, computer games and the Internet. All genres and styles are within the scope of this class, including Anime, cartoons, computer game art, experimental art and special effects. In addition to how, we will also explore and discuss why, as well as the role and potential of animation in our society and its place in other cultures. This course is designed for the student who wishes to pursue further study in the field, and provides intensive practice of the basic skills and methods through production. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 105 or GPH 211 or ART 105 or GD 105

ANI 206
HISTORY OF ANIMATION
(UGRD)

This course is an introduction to the history and development of the field of animation. We will explore this subject from various perspectives: by chronology, from its prehistory before the invention of film to the present day; by form, including method and medium; by culture, comparing the US to Japan, Russia, Europe and others; by subject; and by personality, concentrating on the figures who have shaped the art form and continue to influence it through their example. Students are expected to bring an enthusiastic interest in the medium, and to devote serious effort to reading about, viewing, researching and discussing animation and the artists who have created it.

ANI 207
ANIME HISTORY
(UGRD)

This course is an Introduction to the history, development and cultural significance of Japanese animation. We will explore how historical and cultural concepts of Japan have translated to the screen, as well as the influence of economic forces and changing technology. Students will gain an insight into anime's origins and cultural influences through an examination of the World War II, post-war, mid- and late-twentieth-century historical periods of Japan. This class will analyze particular examples of anime and anime artists in their historical context, emphasizing the use of primary sources.

ANI 220
STORYBOARDING AND NARRATIVE DEVELOPMENT
(UGRD)

This class will focus primarily on storyboarding and the aesthetic and practical uses of research, treatments, drawings, and found images as tools in the production of animations, films and game cinematics. Students will complete a series of assignments that will utilize different methods of finding inspiration to make a cohesive, narrative work. Various methods used in both commercial and independent productions will be presented as examples, and pre-production work from both live action and animated films will be viewed throughout the quarter. Students will create several storyboards for short films, write treatments, and research design options. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 101, ANI 201 or DC 110

ANI 222
ILLUSTRATION FOUNDATIONS
(UGRD)

This course will focus on improving the basic skills needed for creating concept art and storyboards for animation and games. Areas of focus include practical perspective, technical rendering, observational drawing and color theory. These skills will be applied in basic prototyping projects. PREREQUISITE(S): GD 105 or ANI 105

ANI 225
MAKING COMICS
(UGRD)

This course introduces students to the components of graphic narrative, including superhero and alternative comics, comic strips, manga, and graphic novels. Students will learn fundamental materials and techniques, including penciling and inking, digital painting and coloring, and publishing, and create their own graphic narratives. The course will also provide an overview of the history of comics and graphic storytelling, and their relation and importance to the art of animation. PREREQUISITE(S): ART 106

ANI 230
3D DESIGN & MODELING
(UGRD)

Students will use computer modeling to explore the principles of 3-dimensional design. Projects involving object, character and architectural modeling will emphasize the aesthetic concepts of spatial proportion (scale, angle and position), silhouette, negative space, rhythm, balance, light/shadow and texture. Students will emerge with the ability to create well designed 3D models, and be familiar with the basics of polygonal modeling, texturing, lighting and rendering for animation, computer games and cinema. PREREQUISITE(S): None

ANI 231
3D ANIMATION
(UGRD)

In this course, students will be introduced to animation in 3D through the use of traditional animation principles. Topics will include: animation fundamentals, keyframing, splining, animated cameras, rendering, and an introduction to rigging basic characters. Emphasis will be placed on using the computer as a tool to create animation for film and games. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230

ANI 240
ANIMATION PRODUCTION I
(UGRD)

This course will concentrate on facilitating the student's production of animation projects. The topics of idea generation, experimentation, problem solving, planning and time management, and the process of critical analysis will be applied to the student's work, with the choice of animation technique, content and form left to the individual. Students will learn the importance of bringing projects to completion. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 321

ANI 260
MOTION GRAPHICS
(UGRD)

This course will introduce the student to effective communication using motion graphics, including its application in the areas of film titles, broadcast and commercial design, interactive media, and gaming. The combination of music, visuals and typography will be explored following the basic theories of kinetic composition and aesthetics. Students will study the history of the field, including the work of pioneers such as Norman McLaren, Saul Bass and Len Lye. PREREQUISITE(S): Sophomore Standing and one of the following: ANI 105, ANI 101, GD 105, ART 105, GPH 211, DC 205

ANI 300
3D CHARACTER ANIMATION
(UGRD)

This course explores the art and techniques for character performance in 3D. Students will study and employ fundamental principles for character animation beginning with the essentials of blocking and inbetweening, and continuing with core mechanics including walk cycles, expressions, and lip sync. Students are required to animate weekly shots culminating in a final lip synced character performance. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 231

ANI 301
ADVANCED 3D CHARACTER ANIMATION
(UGRD)

This course introduces advanced concepts in 3D character animation that are necessary for achieving professional quality results. Students will hone their skills through the study of advanced techniques for animating multiple characters, creating continuity, and building character through performance. An emphasis will be placed on the exploration of movement for developing personal style. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 300

ANI 310
MOTION CAPTURE
(UGRD)

This course is a workshop focusing on realistic character motion obtained through motion capture. Students will learn the motion capture pipeline, including character skinning and mapping, planning and directing motion capture sessions, applying motion to a character and motion editing. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 231 or GPH 338

ANI 315
AUDIO FOR ANIMATION
(UGRD)

This class will explore concepts and practical techniques students need in order to address many of the unique challenges associated with creating audio for animated films. Students will begin with an introduction to audio production before moving on to build practical skills for both field and studio recording. Lectures, readings, and hands on projects will give students a working knowledge of how to approach and create the immense range of styles of audio for animated films, from classic cartoon soundtracks to the live action style mixes of many of today's animated Hollywood blockbusters. Students will complete several audio projects including a multi-track mix for an animated short. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 240

ANI 320
HAND-DRAWN ANIMATION
(UGRD)

This course is devoted to the complex aspects and techniques of classical drawn animation required to create convincing movement, frame to frame consistency, and character acting. Beginning with a review of the fundamentals and progressing to more complicated techniques, students will learn how to create unique and technically accomplished drawn animation as well as methods for its eventual clean-up, inking and coloring. Contemporary uses of digital technology to enhance production will be emphasized. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 201 (or ANI 101) and ART 106

ANI 321
ANIMATION MECHANICS
(UGRD)

Students in this course will rigorously investigate the foundational aspects of animation through traditional and digital methods. Basic principles, including timing, spacing and the abstraction of movement, will be analyzed and questioned through experimentation. Students will experience how the process of making work can be used to generate emergent ideas, and be challenged to push the art form beyond the accepted conventions. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 201 or ANI 101

ANI 322
ANIMATION HISTORY & PRACTICE
(UGRD)

The history of animation is explored with a focus on inspiring the students' own work. Students will be involved in an intense study of animation throughout history and around the world, and are required to view a large amount of work outside of class. Animations will be grouped by time period, theme, and/or technique. Through writing and group discussions they will examine the significance of the technique and subject matter. They will put this study into practice by creating short animated films based on their reactions to the films. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 240

ANI 324
STORY DEVELOPMENT
(UGRD)

Students will elaborate on the skills from ANI 220 to create sophisticated pre-production for their own films, game cinematics and animations. Emphasis is placed on advanced story development, professional artistry and pre-visualization techniques such as converting a script to visual story reels or animatics. Students will complete the course with a fully-developed animatic for the story of their choosing. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 220

ANI 325
VISUAL STORYTELLING
(UGRD)

This class focuses on storyboarding and animatics as key pre-production tools for animation, film, and game development projects. Areas of focus include narrative development, drawing, performance, and editing. Students will apply these techniques to create an animatic: a comprehensive time-based draft for a short film. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 240

ANI 326
VISUAL CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT
(UGRD)

This course focuses on visual development and style guides for animation, cinema and game projects. Coursework involves character design, environmental design, prop design, lighting, color, texture and layout. Students will practice visual research, drawing and an array of digital tools to build the skills necessary to create an immersive world with a cohesive look and feel. PREREQUISITE(S): ILL 200 and ANI 230

ANI 327
HAND-DRAWN CHARACTER ANIMATION
(UGRD)

In this course, students will be introduced to the traditional art of hand-drawn character performance. Topics covered will include acting, body mechanics, volume, weight, walk cycles, dialogue and facial expression. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 321

ANI 330
3D CHARACTER MODELING
(UGRD)

This course will instruct students in the process of 3D polygonal based character modeling. Students will learn professional techniques for building quad-based polygon meshes with an extra emphasis on proper topology to help prepare their model for rigging. Students will learn complete UV unwrapping for the entire figure as well as effective techniques for advanced texturing. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230 or GPH 250

ANI 332
3D RIGGING
(UGRD)

Students will study the processes and techniques for creating professional quality character rigs. Following a professional production workflow, students will create character skeletons, learn aesthetic and technical considerations for skinning, learn techniques for optimal parameterization, and learn to construct character animation controls. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 231

ANI 333
ADVANCED 3D RIGGING
(UGRD)

This course will teach students inorganic rigging of vehicles and machines as well as advanced techniques for characters such as blend shape facial expression setups and squash and stretch. Additional topics will include quadruped rigging and 3D scripting for creating user interfaces and automating complex processes. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230 and ANI 231

ANI 336
3D MODELING STUDIO
(UGRD)

Students in this course will broaden and improve their overall skill set by learning a range of modeling techniques. Students will complete several smaller projects that cover topics including speed modeling, efficient low-poly modeling, hard surface modeling, projection texturing, and advanced UV unwrapping techniques. The course will culminate in a final project in which the student will propose and complete an advanced model of their own design. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230 or GPH 250

ANI 337
ENVIRONMENT MODELING
(UGRD)

This course covers the planning, production and implementation of environment models for games. The term "environment model" includes landscape, exterior architecture, interior architecture, and both organic and man-made props. Topics include visual art direction, setting mood, developing narrative and cinematic lighting strategies. After creating assets in a modeling program, students will implement them in a game engine editor to learn about game engine requirements, limitations and pipeline. Prerequisite: ANI 230

ANI 338
3D ORGANIC MODELING
(UGRD)

In this course students will learn to create highly detailed creatures, characters, and props for both film and games. Students will learn a variety of techniques for working with high density polygon meshes and 3D painting in order to generate detailed texture and normal maps. This course will combine a traditional approach to sculpting and a foundation in human anatomy for quick generation of concepts for 3D models. An emphasis will be placed on developing efficient pipelines to streamline the entire process from modeling to rendering. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230

ANI 339
3D TEXTURING AND LIGHTING
(UGRD)

Students will study the processes and techniques for texturing and lighting in 3D. Procedures including preparing models for texturing, creating and manipulating shading networks, laying out UV's, and painting textures will be explored. Topics in lighting will be approached from the foundation of traditional cinematography with a focus on driving both mood and story. Students will utilize complimentary skills in lighting and texturing to create high quality renders for both still and moving images. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230 or GPH 250

ANI 340
ANIMATION PRODUCTION II
(UGRD)

Students will build on the skills learning in Animation Production I, and produce more ambitious projects. They will be expected to exhibit sophisticated technique, storytelling and content, and work to develop as creative artists through self-critique. The successful planning and completion of projects on time is essential. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 220 and ANI 240 and junior standing

ANI 341
ANIMATION PRODUCTION III
(UGRD)

This course asks students to create a short animated film. Students are expected to demonstrate a high level of technical skill with animation and to exhibit maturity in concept development and storytelling. Successful planning and project management is critical. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 340

ANI 342
3D ANIMATION PRODUCTION
(UGRD)

In this course, students will build on their skills from Animation Production I to create animated films in 3D. Students will learn the essentials of 3D production including; creating 3D animatics, setting up production pipelines, and using efficient techniques for modeling, rigging, and animating. Workflows for both individual and collaborative projects will be introduced. Students will be expected to exhibit sophisticated technique, storytelling and content, and work to develop as creative artists through self-critique. The successful planning and completion of projects on time will be an essential focus of the course. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 220, ANI 231, and ANI 240

ANI 344
VISUAL DESIGN FOR GAMES
(UGRD)

The stages of development in the visual direction of a video game will be identified and detailed, and students will participate in the creation of the visual art direction of a product, giving special attention to the design of 3D models and animation. Visual Design for Games topics include: creating visual direction, concepting, art bibles, art production, and post-production strategies. Students will create proposals, create concepts, iteratively create artwork, and analyze competitive products. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230 and (ANI 105, GD 105, or ART 105)

ANI 345
CHARACTER DESIGN
(UGRD)

Students will be introduced to various methods of creating interesting and original character designs for animated films and games, and then put these approaches into practical use. Methods of creative concepting will include drawing, collage, sculpture and 3D mock-ups. Fundamental visual design and color principles will be stressed, along with the basics of caricature. Students will utilize their character designs in an animated short. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230

ANI 347
ART FOR GAME MODS
(UGRD)

In this course, students will build on their skills from 3D Design & Modeling and 3D Environment Modeling to take an existing game in Unity and "re-skin" or modify it to create a different visual experience when played. They will work on collaborative projects while building good working knowledge of 3d art pipeline, materials, lighting, and game performance. They will be expected to exhibit proficiency in analyzing and understanding how game assets are constructed, breaking down and replacing components of existing art with their own, and debugging visual issues related to the introduction of new game assets. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230, ANI 337, and Junior standing

ANI 350
ANIMATION PRODUCTION STUDIO
(UGRD)

This course uses the animation studio model to create a group project from start to finish. Students learn about the division of labor needed to produce larger projects as they experience working with others on a team. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 240

ANI 351
ADVANCED MOTION CAPTURE STUDIO
(UGRD)

This course will enable students with motion capture experience to advance their technical skills and gain experience with practical application in the motion capture studio. Emphasis will be placed on advanced skinning and mapping techniques as well as complex motion capture sessions involving sets, props, and multiple actors. Students will be required to plan, arrange, and direct their own sessions in the motion capture studio. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 310 or ANI 450

ANI 352
3D SCRIPTING
(UGRD)

This is an introductory course in scripting for a 3D production environment. Students will learn and apply basic programming concepts in order to improve the productivity of animators and modelers. Using script, we will automate repetitive tasks, customize the interface, and create new tools. Students will gain a fundamental understanding of how a 3D animation package functions behind the interface. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230 and ANI 231

ANI 353
ADVANCED 3D SCRIPTING
(UGRD)

In this course, artists and game designers will learn to use scripting to develop advanced tools and to automate complex processes for animation, modeling, and pipeline development. Through weekly projects students will learn to read, modify, and author scripts in order to bridge the artistic and technical features of a high end 3D software package. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 352

ANI 355
STOP MOTION ANIMATION
(UGRD)

The principles of stop motion character animation in real space are the emphasis of this intermediate level course. Students are introduced to basic armature building, lighting and scene composition, and the designing and fabrication of characters with a variety of materials. Contemporary uses of digital technology to enhance stop motion production will be explored. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 201 (or ANI 101)

ANI 356
EXPERIMENTAL ANIMATION
(UGRD)

This course introduces strategies for an experimental approach to animation. Students will study how experimentation relates to both concept and technique, and examine the work of classic experimental animators. This is a production class that requires students to produce a series of short animations in a variety of processes and styles. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 201 or ANI 101

ANI 357
HYBRID ANIMATION
(UGRD)

This production course focuses on combining multiple animation techniques. Students will complete the assignments and final project using mixed media with the choice of animation techniques, content and form left to the individual or group. Topics include pixilation, rotoscoping, and creative use of green screen, among others. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 201 or ANI 101

ANI 360
ADVANCED MOTION GRAPHICS
(UGRD)

This course builds on motion graphics fundamentals covered in ANI260 Motion Graphics. In Advanced Motion Graphics, students will work to develop a better understanding of how to develop a distinct visual style in both personal work and in work for clients. The course also focuses on gaining familiarity with contemporary styles and trends in professional motion graphics, and an awareness of Chicago-based motion graphics production. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI260

ANI 362
TITLES FOR CINEMA AND ANIMATION
(UGRD)

This course explores concepts and techniques involved in creating movie titles, TV openings, and supporting graphics for video and animation. The use of alluring sound and imagery is essential to a successful and professional-looking film. A conceptual understanding of the role time and motion have in the presentation of visual content is explored through lectures and projects. Students will gain an appreciation and skill for producing time-based media that will add value, clarity, and sophistication to cinema and animation projects. Students are encouraged to enter the course with projects in need of titles and graphics. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 101 or ANI 201 or VFX 200

ANI 364
ANIMATION RESEARCH SEMINAR
(UGRD)

This seminar introduces students to animation in the context of interdisciplinary thinking and creativity. Students will discuss their learning experiences across disciplines in the University, and practice making connections between this learning and their study of animation. PREREQUISITE(S): None

ANI 365
CINEMA, ANIMATION, AND ART
(UGRD)

This seminar course focuses on animation and cinema from the standpoint of Modern and Contemporary art. Students study the major styles and themes of historical experimental film and video, and relate these topics to contemporary animation and independent cinema practices. Emphasis is placed on theory and criticism, and how it informs experimental work. Students are expected to discuss work and theory in a seminar setting, and to engage the class material in several research papers. PREREQUISITE(S): DC 233

ANI 366
3D MOVIE PRODUCTION
(UGRD)

This course provides an introduction to stereoscopy which is the creation of a 3D effect in still images and movies. The course covers the history of stereoscopy, the perceptual theories that make 3D images possible, and the technologies that can be used to create the effect of stereoscopic depth. Designed for both animators and live-action filmmakers, students taking this course will get hands-on experience producing stereoscopic images and movies using a variety of tools. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230 or DC 275

ANI 370
ACTING FOR ANIMATORS
(UGRD)

This is acting training designed specifically for the needs of animators, as opposed to stage actors. Utilizing lecture/discussion, examination/deconstruction of animated and live-action film clips, home assignments and a few simple in-class improvisations, this course provides the animator with the skills necessary to deliver dynamic animated character performance. Assessment measures include oral and written reflective analysis, short animated character sketches and class participation. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 240

ANI 375
PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE FOR ANIMATORS AND GAME ARTISTS
(UGRD)

Students will learn to prepare for and identify internship, employment, and graduate school opportunities. Students learn how to develop work for and prepare a portfolio/demo reel. The course will also include preparation of job search and promotional materials, including resumes. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 240 or GAM 245 or DC 310 (2 quarter hours)

ANI 376
POST-PRODUCTION WORKSHOP
(UGRD)

This 2 credit course guides students through the final stages of post-production and completes the Animation Capstone sequence. Students will work closely with faculty to meet the needs specific to their Capstone projects. This workshop will also focus on distribution for completed films, including film festivals, online forums, and gallery exhibition. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 395 (2 quarter hours)

ANI 378
3D DYNAMICS
(UGRD)

This course will provide an introduction to dynamic simulation and effects in 3D animation. Topics to be covered include hair & fur, fluid dynamics, smoke & fire, particles and cloth. An emphasis will be placed on how these effects can enhance an idea or narrative, establish mood, or even be used as a basis for experimental animation. Students will use traditional animation and visual design principles as a basis for creating several small projects. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230 and ANI 231

ANI 379
3D COMPOSITING
(UGRD)

This course is designed to allow advanced compositors and animators to merge the 2D, 3D and/or live-action video worlds, drawing from a combination of techniques such as motion tracking, compositing, rotoscoping, hand-drawn, cut-out and 3D animation. The goals are to go beyond simply achieving technical proficiency, as we will also focus on learning principles of good animation in preparation for both artistic and commercial endeavors. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 231

ANI 380
ANIMATION PROJECT BLUELIGHT
(UGRD)

Production of an animated digital motion picture written by students or faculty within the School of Cinematic Arts. Students will work as crew under supervision of faculty members heading each of the various production areas. The goal is to work towards a completed animated digital motion picture suitable for festivals or distribution.

ANI 390
TOPICS IN ANIMATION
(UGRD)

Advanced study in animation focusing on a specific area each quarter. May be repeated for credit. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 101 or ANI 201 or consent of the instructor.

ANI 393
TOPICS IN 3D ANIMATION
(UGRD)

Advanced study in 3D animation focusing on a specific area each quarter. May be repeated for credit. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230 or consent of the instructor.

ANI 394
ANIMATION PROJECT I
(UGRD)

This production-based course is the first half of a two-course sequence that provides the student with an Animation capstone experience. These courses connect the student's Animation coursework with their overall Liberal Studies coursework through three components: class lectures and discussions, independent analysis and reflection, and the creation of a significant animation project. Students will employ the knowledge they have learned and the skills they have acquired in all their Animation courses to date to produce a significant animation project. The course sequence is designed to be taken in two consecutive quarters. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 340 and Senior standing

ANI 395
ANIMATION PROJECT II
(UGRD)

Continuation of ANI 394. This production-based course is the second half of a two-course sequence that provides the student with an Animation capstone experience. These courses connect the student's Animation coursework with their overall Liberal Studies coursework through three components: class lectures and discussions, independent analysis and reflection, and the creation of a significant animation project. Students will employ the knowledge they have learned and the skills they have acquired in all their Animation courses to date to produce a significant animation project. The course sequence is designed to be taken in two consecutive quarters. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 394

ANI 399
INDEPENDENT STUDY
(UGRD)

Independent study form and consent of instructor required. PREREQUISITE(S): Consent of dean. (Variable credit)

ANI 420
HAND-DRAWN ANIMATION
(GRAD)

This course is devoted to the complex aspects and techniques of classical drawn animation required to create convincing movement, frame to frame consistency, and character acting. Beginning with a review of the fundamentals and progressing to more complicated techniques, students will learn how to create unique and technically accomplished drawn animation as well as methods for its eventual clean-up, inking and coloring. Contemporary uses of digital technology to enhance production will be emphasized. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 201 (or ANI 101)

ANI 421
ANIMATION MECHANICS
(GRAD)

Students in this course will rigorously investigate the foundational aspects of animation through traditional and digital methods. Basic principles, including timing, spacing and the abstraction of movement, will be analyzed and questioned through experimentation. Students will experience how the process of making work can be used to generate emergent ideas, and be challenged to push the art form beyond the accepted conventions. PREREQUISITE(S): None

ANI 422
ANIMATION HISTORY & PRACTICE
(GRAD)

The history of animation is explored with a focus on inspiring the students' own work. Students will be involved in an intense study of animation throughout history and around the world, and are required to view a large amount of work outside of class. Animations will be grouped by time period, theme, and/or technique. Through writing and group discussions they will examine the significance of the technique and subject matter. They will put this study into practice by creating short animated films based on their reactions to the films. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 421

ANI 423
3D ANIMATION SURVEY
(GRAD)

This course is intended as an intensive overview for graduate students with NO prior 3D experience. Topics include polygonal modeling tools, texturing, principles of 3D animation, basic rigging, camera, lighting and rendering. Animation graduate students with proof of previous 3D experience should consult their advisor to substitute any Major Elective for this course. PREREQUISITE(S): None

ANI 425
VISUAL STORYTELLING
(GRAD)

This class focuses on storyboarding and animatics as key pre-production tools for animation, film, and game development projects. Areas of focus include narrative development, drawing, performance, and editing. Students will apply these techniques to create an animatic: a comprehensive time-based draft for a short film. PREREQUISITE(S): None

ANI 427
HAND-DRAWN CHARACTER ANIMATION
(GRAD)

In this course, students will be introduced to the traditional art of hand-drawn character performance. Topics covered will include acting, body mechanics, volume, weight, walk cycles, dialogue and facial expression. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 421

ANI 430
3D CHARACTER ANIMATION
(GRAD)

This course explores the art and techniques for character performance in 3D. Students will study and employ fundamental principles for character animation beginning with the essentials of blocking and inbetweening, and continuing with core mechanics including walk cycles, expressions, and lip sync. Students are required to animate weekly shots culminating in a final lip synced character performance. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 423

ANI 431
ADVANCED 3D CHARACTER ANIMATIO
(GRAD)

This course introduces advanced concepts in 3D character animation that are necessary for achieving professional quality results. Students will hone their skills through the study of advanced techniques for animating multiple characters, creating continuity, and building character through performance. An emphasis will be placed on the exploration of movement for developing personal style. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 300 or ANI 430

ANI 432
3D RIGGING
(GRAD)

Students will study the processes and techniques for creating professional quality character rigs. Following a professional production workflow, students will create character skeletons, learn aesthetic and technical considerations for skinning, learn techniques for optimal parametrization, and learn to construct character animation controls. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 231 or ANI 405

ANI 433
ADVANCED 3D RIGGING
(GRAD)

This course will teach students to rig organic and inorganic objects. Students will learn to rig a "stretchy spine" along with a more detailed facial set up for a character. Other topics will include inorganic object rigging, quadruped rigging and the use of 3D scripting in rigging. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230 and ANI 231

ANI 435
3D CHARACTER MODELING
(GRAD)

This course will instruct students in the process of 3D polygonal based character modeling. Students will learn professional techniques for building quad-based polygon meshes with an extra emphasis on proper topology to help prepare their model for rigging. Students will learn complete UV unwrapping for the entire figure as well as effective techniques for advanced texturing. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230 or ANI 405 or GPH 250

ANI 436
3D MODELING STUDIO
(GRAD)

Students in this course will broaden and improve their overall skill set by learning a range of modeling techniques. Students will complete several smaller projects that cover topics including speed modeling, efficient low-poly modeling, hard surface modeling, projection texturing, and advanced UV unwrapping techniques. The course will culminate in a final project in which the student will propose and complete an advanced model of their own design. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230 or ANI 405 or GPH 250

ANI 437
ENVIRONMENT MODELING
(GRAD)

This course covers the planning, production and implementation of environment models for games. The term "environment model" includes landscape, exterior architecture, interior architecture, and both organic and man-made props. Topics include visual art direction, setting mood, developing narrative and cinematic lighting strategies. After creating assets in a modeling program, students will implement them in a game engine editor to learn about game engine requirements, limitations and pipeline. Prerequisite: ANI 230 or ANI 405

ANI 438
3D ORGANIC MODELING
(GRAD)

In this course students learn a variety of modeling tools specially geared toward creating highly detailed and complex organic models for games or films. Various sculpting and texturing techniques available in organic modeling will be discussed as well as proper UV and polygon modeling methods. Students will also gain an understanding of how to build proper human anatomy structures. Students will learn how to create a proper art pipeline between modeling, sculpting, texturing and rendering software packages. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230 or ANI 405

ANI 439
3D TEXTURING AND LIGHTING
(GRAD)

Students will study the processes and techniques for creating shaders and lighting setups for both cinematic and gaming environments. Techniques in UV mapping and projection mapping will be explored for both environments and character creation. Lighting will be approached from the foundation of traditional cinematography. Additional topics, including negative lighting and global illumination, will also be covered. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230 or ANI 405 or GPH 250

ANI 440
COLLABORATIVE SHORT ANIMATED FILM
(GRAD)

Students will work in small groups to produce short animated films from concept to completion using the media of their choice. Emphasis is placed on a collaborative environment for pitching ideas, visual development and creative problem-solving during production. Different studio methodologies and techniques will be discussed. Each team will face various technical and aesthetic challenges to complete a finished film. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 421 or ANI 453

ANI 442
3D ANIMATION PRODUCTION
(GRAD)

In this course, students will create animated films in 3D. Students will learn the essentials of 3D production including; creating 3D animatics, setting up production pipelines, and using efficient techniques for modeling, rigging, and animating. Workflows for both individual and collaborative projects will be introduced. Students will be expected to exhibit sophisticated technique, storytelling and content, and work to develop as creative artists through self-critique. The successful planning and completion of projects on time will be an essential focus of the course. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 423 and ANI 425

ANI 444
VISUAL DESIGN FOR GAMES
(GRAD)

The stages of development in the visual direction of a video game will be identified and detailed, and students will participate in the creation of the visual art direction of a product, giving special attention to the design of 3D models and animation. Visual Design for Games topics include: creating visual direction, concepting, art bibles, art production, and post-production strategies. Students will create proposals, create concepts, iteratively create artwork, and analyze competitive products. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 446, ANI 425, ANI 105, GD 105, GPH 211 or ART 105 (or equivalent 2D design experience)

ANI 445
CHARACTER DESIGN
(GRAD)

Students will be introduced to various methods of creating interesting and original character designs for animated films and games, and then put these approaches into practical use. Methods of creative concepting will include drawing, collage, sculpture and 3D mock-ups. Fundamental visual design and color principles will be stressed, along with the basics of caricature. Students will utilize their character designs in an animated short. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230 or ANI 405

ANI 446
GAME ART PIPELINE
(GRAD)

This course is an introduction to the game technical artist's job. Students learn how to design, engineer, and troubleshoot the game art production pipeline. They study good practices and successful strategies for streamlining at different stages of production process. Projects include analyzing problems and then spec'ing out solutions, creating a workflow for producing and exporting assets to several platforms/ engines, and creating instructional documentation. PREREQUISITE(S): (ANI 230 or ANI 405) and (ANI 231 or ANI 405)

ANI 447
ART FOR GAME MODS
(GRAD)

In this course, students will take an existing game in Unity and modify it to create a different visual experience when played. They will work on collaborative projects while building good working knowledge of 3d art pipeline, materials, lighting, and game performance. They will be expected to exhibit proficiency in analyzing and understanding how game assets are constructed, breaking down and replacing components of existing art with their own, and debugging visual issues related to the introduction of new game assets. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 446 or ANI 444

ANI 450
MOTION CAPTURE
(GRAD)

This course is a workshop focusing on realistic character motion obtained through motion capture. Students will learn the motion capture pipeline, including character skinning and mapping, planning and directing motion capture sessions, applying motion to a character and motion editing. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 231 or ANI 405 or GPH 438.

ANI 451
ADVANCED MOTION CAPTURE STUDIO
(GRAD)

This course will enable students with motion capture experience to advance their technical skills and gain experience with practical application in the motion capture studio. Emphasis will be placed on advanced skinning and mapping techniques as well as complex motion capture sessions involving sets, props, and multiple actors. Students will be required to plan, arrange, and direct their own sessions in the motion capture studio. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 310 or ANI 450

ANI 452
3D SCRIPTING
(GRAD)

This is an introductory course in scripting for a 3D production environment. Students will learn and apply basic programming concepts in order to improve the productivity of animators and modelers. Using script, we will automate repetitive tasks, customize the interface, and create new tools. Students will gain a fundamental understanding of how a 3D animation package functions behind the interface. PREREQUISITE(S): (ANI 230 or ANI 405) and (ANI 231 or ANI 405)

ANI 453
ADVANCED 3D SCRIPTING
(GRAD)

This is an intermediate course in scripting for a 3D production environment. Students will go beyond the introductory course to learn more advanced scripting techniques and practices. Students will learn how to assess a problem/ opportunity in the production pipeline, spec out tools, build an effective tool and produce simple interfaces. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 452

ANI 455
STOP MOTION ANIMATION
(GRAD)

The principles of stop motion character animation in real space are the emphasis of this intermediate level course. Students are introduced to basic armature building, lighting and scene composition, and the designing and fabrication of characters with a variety of materials. Contemporary uses of digital technology to enhance stop motion production will be explored. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 201 (or ANI 101)

ANI 456
EXPERIMENTAL ANIMATION
(GRAD)

This course introduces strategies for an experimental approach to animation. Students will study how experimentation relates to both concept and technique, and examine the work of classic experimental animators. This is a production class that requires students to produce a series of short animations in a variety of processes and styles. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 201 or ANI 101

ANI 457
HYBRID ANIMATION
(GRAD)

This production course focuses on combining multiple animation techniques. Students will complete the assignments and final project using mixed media with the choice of animation techniques, content and form left to the individual or group. Topics include pixilation, rotoscoping, and creative use of green screen, among others. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 421

ANI 460
ANIMATION GRADUATE SEMINAR
(GRAD)

This seminar will explore the animator's role in contemporary culture, including careers in entertainment, art, game development and education. A combination of guest speakers, critical readings, animation analysis and group discussion will help students lay a foundation for their graduate study in the field.

ANI 461
MOTION GRAPHICS
(GRAD)

This course introduces effective communication using motion graphics; including its application in the areas of film titles, broadcast and commercial design, interactive media, and gaming. The combination of music, animation, graphic design and typography will be explored following the basic theories of dynamic composition and aesthetics. A focus and analysis on Motion Graphics History, including abstract film, modernist television, computer art, synesthesia, and film title design, will be coupled with animation and design exercises, and simulated concept "pitch" presentations. An emphasis is placed on gaining familiarity with contemporary styles and trends in professional motion graphics, as well as state-of-the-art software and tools. Readings and responses will be due each week in addition to practical projects. Projects will include: 3 short fundamental exercises, a concept development and pitch presentation, a film title design project, and a 7-10 page research paper.

ANI 462
TITLES FOR CINEMA AND ANIMATION
(GRAD)

This course explores concepts and techniques involved in creating movie titles, TV openings, and supporting graphics for video and animation. The use of alluring sound and imagery is essential to a successful and professional-looking film. A conceptual understanding of the role time and motion have in the presentation of visual content is explored through lectures and projects. Students will gain an appreciation and skill for producing time-based media that will add value, clarity, and sophistication to cinema and animation projects. Students are encouraged to enter the course with projects in need of titles and graphics.

ANI 466
CINEMA, ANIMATION AND ART
(GRAD)

This seminar course focuses on animation and cinema from the standpoint of Modern and Contemporary art. Students study the major styles and themes of historical experimental film and video, and relate these topics to contemporary animation and independent cinema practices. Emphasis is placed on theory and criticism, and how it informs experimental work. Students are expected to discuss work and theory in a seminar setting, and to engage the class material in several research papers.

ANI 470
ACTING FOR ANIMATORS
(GRAD)

This is acting training designed specifically for the needs of animators, as opposed to stage actors. Utilizing lecture/discussion, examination/deconstruction of animated and live-action film clips, home assignments and a few simple in-class improvisations, this course provides the animator with the skills necessary to deliver dynamic animated character performance. Assessment measures include oral and written reflective analysis, short animated character sketches and class participation. PREREQUISITE(S): 421

ANI 478
3D DYNAMICS
(GRAD)

This course will provide an introduction to dynamic simulation and effects in 3D animation. Topics to be covered include hair and fur, fluid dynamics, smoke and fire, particles, and cloth. An emphasis will be placed on how these effects can enhance an idea or narrative, establish mood, or even be used as a basis for experimental animation. Students will use traditional animation and visual design principles as a basis for creating several small projects. PREREQUISITE(S): (ANI 230 or ANI 405) and (ANI 231 or ANI 405)

ANI 479
3D COMPOSITING
(GRAD)

This course is designed to allow advanced compositors and animators to merge the 2D, 3D and/or live-action video worlds, drawing from a combination of techniques such as motion tracking, compositing, rotoscoping, hand-drawn, cut-out and 3D animation. The goals are to go beyond simply achieving technical proficiency, as we will also focus on learning principles of good animation in preparation for both artistic and commercial endeavors. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 231 or ANI 405

ANI 480
ANIMATION PROJECT BLUELIGHT
(GRAD)

Production of an animated digital motion picture written by students or faculty within the School of Cinematic Arts. Students will work as crew under supervision of faculty members heading each of the various production areas. The goal is to work towards a completed animated digital motion picture suitable for festivals or distribution.

ANI 481
AUDIO FOR ANIMATION
(GRAD)

This class will explore concepts and practical techniques students need in order to address many of the unique challenges associated with creating audio for animated films. Students will begin with an introduction to audio production before moving on to build practical skills for both field and studio recording. Lectures, readings, and hands on projects will give students a working knowledge of how to approach and create the immense range of styles of audio for animated films, from classic cartoon soundtracks to the live action style mixes of many of today's animated Hollywood blockbusters. Students will complete several audio projects including a multi-track mix for an animated short. PREREQUISITE: None

ANI 490
TOPICS IN ANIMATION
(GRAD)

Advanced study in animation focusing on a specific area each quarter. May be repeated for credit. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 101 or ANI 201 or consent of the instructor.

ANI 493
TOPICS IN 3D ANIMATION
(GRAD)

Advanced study in 3D animation focusing on a specific area each quarter. May be repeated for credit. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 230 or ANI 405 or consent of the instructor.

ANI 540
ANIMATED SHORT FILM PART I
(GRAD)

This course and its continuation, ANI 541, will concentrate on facilitating the graduate students' production of a short, independently animated project. The topics of idea generation, experimentation, problem solving, planning and time management, and the process of critical analysis will be applied to the students work, with the choice of animation technique, content and form left to the individual. We will have technical demonstrations on an as-needed basis, depending on the nature of your animations. This course must be taken consecutively with ANI 541 Animated Short Film Part II. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 440 (2 quarter hours)

ANI 541
ANIMATED SHORT FILM PART II
(GRAD)

This course is a continuation of ANI 540 Animated Short Film Part I. Throughout the quarter students will continue working on their films, meeting with the instructor for advising, and other students for group critiques. Students will also learn effective post-production strategies as they near completion of their first film. This course must be taken consecutively with ANI 540. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 540 (2 quarter hours)

ANI 560
GRADUATE TEACHING SEMINAR
(GRAD)

This seminar exposes students to effective methods and professional practices of teaching undergraduate and graduate students. A variety of approaches to course materials and projects will be introduced and discussed in detail. In addition to work in class, students will work closely with a faculty member in order to gain first-hand knowledge, including class observation, of practical aspects of creative and academic instruction. PREREQUISITE(S): none

ANI 599
INDEPENDENT STUDY
(GRAD)

Independent study form. PREREQUISITE(S): Consent of dean and consent of instructor required. (Variable credit)

ANI 639
MFA PRE-THESIS
(GRAD)

In this course the MFA student will develop the concept and pre-production of their thesis animation through workshops, critiques and assignments. Students will create inspiration and concept art, write a treatment, create a storyboard and animatic as well as research design options to be used on their final film project in ANI 640 MFA Thesis Animation. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 442

ANI 640
MFA THESIS ANIMATION
(GRAD)

This course is a three quarter class that will concentrate on the graduate students' production, post-production and completion of their final thesis project. Students will have regular critique sessions with their three Thesis Advisors from the animation faculty. The student's project will be presented to the committee upon completion. PREREQUISITE(S): ANI 639 (1 quarter hour)

ANI 701
THESIS CONTINUATION
(GRAD)

Non-credit. Students admitted to MFA program who have completed all the required coursework and who are regularly using the facilities of the University for thesis production and/or post-production are required to be registered each quarter of the academic year until the thesis and defense have been completed. Prerequisite(s): ANI 640 (0 credit hours)

ANT 102
CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
(UGRD)

An introduction to current anthropological theories and methods for understanding human cultures from a comparative perspective; includes an analysis of human institutions such as religion, politics, and kinship, and the forces that change them in a variety of societies, small and large scale.

ANT 103
ARCHAEOLOGY
(UGRD)

An exploration of the science of archaeology, the study of past human behavior through material remains. Examines the ways archaeologists gather data and the methods used to analyze and interpret these data to learn about the past and how human societies evolved.

ANT 104
INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
(UGRD)

This course will examine the biological history of the human species culminating with an exploration of human biological variation in the modern world. Principles of evolutionary theory and genetics will first be presented to provide a framework for the study of human evolutionary biology. The fossil evidence for human evolution will then be considered using comparative data from nonhuman primate ecology to help reconstruct prehistoric lives. Finally, features of biological modernity will be discussed. Particular attention will be given to how human populations utilized biological and behavioral mechanisms to adapt to their environments throughout evolutionary history. The course includes labs.

ANT 105
ANTHROPOLOGY THROUGH FILM
(UGRD)

This course is an introduction to cultural anthropology, the sub-discipline of anthropology concerned with contemporary human cultures, through film. The aim is to convey the anthropological perspective on behaviors and systems that people create. The course will emphasize fundamental concepts, methods, and theories used to study culture.

ANT 106
LANGUAGE AND CULTURE
(UGRD)

Definitions and features of language and communication, and their relationship to thought and culture. Topics include the classification of languages, language acquisition, linguistic variation, language communities, multilingualism, performance, and variability of language use.

ANT 107
THE CULTURE OF BUSINESS
(UGRD)

This course asks what role culture plays in business. We will explore the ways in which culture influences consumer decision-making, global business practices, marketing strategies, corporate ethics, and business education and training. By the end of the course, you will be familiar with the ideas, values, and concerns that underpin business practices and be able to apply your understanding of culture to the way you interact with the business world.

ANT 109
FOOD AND CULTURE
(UGRD)

Explores the concept of culture by focusing on people's knowledge of food; it examines the local sameness and global peculiarity of people's food preferences, considering tastes and environmental impacts, health implications, dietary restrictions, and other social impacts.

ANT 120
SCIENCE OF ARCHAEOLOGY
(UGRD)

Archaeology spans the academic worlds of the physical sciences and the social sciences. In this course, the physical science qualities of the discipline are introduced. Students explore the various ways archaeologists use model building, statistical inference, and evidence analysis to reconstruct past human experiences. The course includes two hour of lab and two hours of lecture/discussion per week.

ANT 201
ETHNOGRAPHIC RESEARCH METHODS
(UGRD)

This course focuses on practicing data collection techniques used by qualitative researchers in the social sciences. Under the supervision of the instructor, students will design and implement a collaborative research project. The techniques to be used may include (but are not limited to) observation, structured and semi-structured interviewing, network analysis, and focused group interviewing. The experience gained in this course prepares students for research activities in future course work, graduate school and professional life. In addition to the practical hands-on training, the course also addresses issues of the relationship of theory to method, ethical concerns in research with human subjects, reflexivity and inter-subjectivity in qualitative research.

ANT 202
ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD METHODS
(UGRD)

This course introduces students to the basic field and laboratory methods used in archaeological research through hands on experience. Students will receive intensive field training in archaeological field methods including excavation, survey, mapping, record keeping, and illustration. The course introduces basic laboratory techniques such as artifact processing, identification, and curation. The methodological training will be integrated through emphases on the place of data collection in the archaeological research process, and the relationship between archaeological data and questions of historical and anthropological importance. This course will provide students with the essential basic field training in archaeology required for both applied work in cultural resource management and continued education in archaeology.

ANT 203
PROFESSIONALISM AND ETHICS IN ANTHROPOLOGY
(UGRD)

This class explores the many dimensions of what it means to be a professional anthropologist in both applied and academic areas. Students will learn about specialized resources for anthropologists (web resources, library resources, funding resources, career resources), and become familiar with the professional structure of the discipline. A large portion of the course will be devoted to the debate/discussion/exploration of ethical issues that challenge anthropologists through the use of real cases that have confronted researchers in the field, and through an evaluation of the ethical codes of conduct adopted by the primary professional organizations in anthropology.

ANT 204
LINEAGES OF CULTURE THEORY
(UGRD)

This course provides the student with a history of the culture concept tracing the lineages of thought about culture from the nineteenth century to the present. Readings and seminar discussions will present an explicit discussion of how ideas and understanding about culture have changed over time and will introduce students to the main branches of cultural theory. Students will develop the skills and confidence to work with the abstractions and concepts that underlie anthropological research. The course is reading and writing intensive.

ANT 206
WORLD PREHISTORY
(UGRD)

Placing an emphasis on both theory and the latest archaeological and multidisciplinary approaches this overview of world prehistory will look at a series of interesting problems and case studies that provide a taste of the richness of human creativity. Topics include the evolution from foraging lifestyles, through the increased control of nature by early farmers, to the rise of states and empires: this is an examination of the deep and tangled roots of today's societies.

ANT 210
AFRICAN CULTURES
(UGRD)

Survey of the people and cultures of Africa. Analysis of beliefs, customs, and social organization of traditional African cultures, and the forces of sociocultural change that have affected traditional patterns of life and are necessary to understand contemporary African societies. Formerly SOC 300.

ANT 220
CULTURES OF EUROPE
(UGRD)

Explores the cultural features of the European experience using ethnographic sources. Focuses on European life at the local level, examines the implications of European Community integration on peoples' lives in various countries, and explores causes of conflict within and between national boundaries. (formerly SOC 300 Regional Ethnology: Peoples of Europe).

ANT 230
CULTURES OF THE PACIFIC
(UGRD)

Explores traditional and contemporary cultures of the Pacific. A survey of Oceanic cultures from Australia, Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia; consideration of the geography and geology of Pacific islands; and analysis of the history of contact between Pacific island peoples with Westerners and the consequences for life in the contemporary Pacific. (formerly SOC 300 Regional Ethnology: The Pacific Islands).

ANT 240
CULTURES OF THE MIDDLE EAST
(UGRD)

Explores the cultures and societies of the contemporary Middle East. Focuses on everyday life and practices, such as religion, social organization, art and popular culture. Uses ethnographic sources to examine the historical influence of various civilizations and religions on contemporary Middle Eastern societies from North Africa to Iran.

ANT 250
MATERIAL CULTURE OF MODERN AMERICA
(UGRD)

This course combines historical archaeology and material culture studies to examine how material goods both shape and reflect American identity. The course will take an historical approach beginning in the 17th century when most Americans wore homespun clothing and produced their own food, and continue to the 21st century and a time when Americans wear the national colors of Tommy Hilfiger and eat fast food lunches. Often such changes in material culture are characterized as the process of "modernization," and as such, the course will be centered on the relationship between material culture, American identity and conceptions of modernity. Cross-listed with AMS 370.

ANT 252
MATERIAL CULTURE AND DOMESTIC LIFE
(UGRD)

This course explores the social, and economic dynamics of households through material culture. Specifically, this course looks at how material goods structure domestic life, reflect values surrounding family and kinship, and mediate the relationship between individual households and broader levels of social organization such as community, society, and culture.

ANT 254
HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY OF CHICAGO
(UGRD)

Students will be participating in an archaeological research project focusing on Chicago's past. The course will include an introduction to the concept of an archaeological research design. Students will engage in historical research using primary documents and analyze archaeological data to address specific research questions about Chicago's recent past.
ANT 202 is a prerequisite for this course.

ANT 256
MATERIAL CULTURE OF THE OLD WORLD
(UGRD)

This course combines archaeology and material culture studies to examine how material goods both shape and reflect human experience in Asia, Africa and Europe. The course